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Immortal Hulk Vol. 10: Of Hell and Death

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We thought they were dead. We thought they’d been banished, controlled, made harmless. We were wrong. The gamma monsters are coming back — converging, one by one, on New York City. And who can stop them now? Who can save us…from the Immortal Hulk? The Avengers are ready to give it their best shot — but last time around, their battle against the Hulk was just business, and We thought they were dead. We thought they’d been banished, controlled, made harmless. We were wrong. The gamma monsters are coming back — converging, one by one, on New York City. And who can stop them now? Who can save us…from the Immortal Hulk? The Avengers are ready to give it their best shot — but last time around, their battle against the Hulk was just business, and they destroyed an entire town. Now they’re in the middle of New York City, about to take on a very different kind of Hulk…and it’s become personal. Run for your lives! COLLECTING: Immortal Hulk (2018) 46-50


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We thought they were dead. We thought they’d been banished, controlled, made harmless. We were wrong. The gamma monsters are coming back — converging, one by one, on New York City. And who can stop them now? Who can save us…from the Immortal Hulk? The Avengers are ready to give it their best shot — but last time around, their battle against the Hulk was just business, and We thought they were dead. We thought they’d been banished, controlled, made harmless. We were wrong. The gamma monsters are coming back — converging, one by one, on New York City. And who can stop them now? Who can save us…from the Immortal Hulk? The Avengers are ready to give it their best shot — but last time around, their battle against the Hulk was just business, and they destroyed an entire town. Now they’re in the middle of New York City, about to take on a very different kind of Hulk…and it’s become personal. Run for your lives! COLLECTING: Immortal Hulk (2018) 46-50

30 review for Immortal Hulk Vol. 10: Of Hell and Death

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Immortal Hulk: Of Hell and Death collects Immortal Hulk 46-50. Well, Al Ewing's Immortal Hulk run has reached its conclusion. Hulk and Ms. McGee head to hell using the Forever Gate and bring the metaphysical epic to its conclusion. The art and writing were superb but my first thought upon finishing it was "That's it?" I guess Ewing's run was more about the journey than the destination. I was hoping for a big fight or something but to paraphrase something Red Hulk says in this volume "Sometimes, wa Immortal Hulk: Of Hell and Death collects Immortal Hulk 46-50. Well, Al Ewing's Immortal Hulk run has reached its conclusion. Hulk and Ms. McGee head to hell using the Forever Gate and bring the metaphysical epic to its conclusion. The art and writing were superb but my first thought upon finishing it was "That's it?" I guess Ewing's run was more about the journey than the destination. I was hoping for a big fight or something but to paraphrase something Red Hulk says in this volume "Sometimes, walking up and punching things doesn't work." The last couple volumes were kind of a letdown but Ewing set the bar a little too high for himself during the 35-40 issues of the series. Still, Immortal Hulk is one of the better Big Two runs of the last 10-15 years. Immortal Hulk: Of Hell and Death brings the series to a somewhat underwhelming conclusion. Three out of five stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Immortal Hulk finally hits it's finale and...it was okay. Here's the thing. I enjoyed Immortal Hulk. Especially the middle section like volume 3-6 or 7. But then it got pretty disjointed closer to the end. Here we have Hulk being defined with who he is and what he is. Before we get into the internal struggle with the one below and the one above, we have to deal with a big brawl with the Avengers. Hulk is looked at as a monster, which all makes sense in the end. I mean look what he's done in this Immortal Hulk finally hits it's finale and...it was okay. Here's the thing. I enjoyed Immortal Hulk. Especially the middle section like volume 3-6 or 7. But then it got pretty disjointed closer to the end. Here we have Hulk being defined with who he is and what he is. Before we get into the internal struggle with the one below and the one above, we have to deal with a big brawl with the Avengers. Hulk is looked at as a monster, which all makes sense in the end. I mean look what he's done in this run alone. But can he actually be redeemed? This was a weird ending. And not in the sense where I'm like "I'm confused what happened" ending, but in a more "Oh...that's...it...okay..." type ending. There's moment of slowdown with Betty that worked really well and I enjoyed some of the other moments of Hulk's internal monologue and end to his mission. But the very ending, the one above all or the one under, didn't really work for me. It dragged on FOREVER. Joe Fix was one of the better parts but even that felt muddled at times. Overall. I feel this run would benefit from reading it in one long sitting instead of through years. To fully feel the story. As it stands it's a okay ending. A 3 out of 5.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    It would have taken an almost Shakespearean feat of writing to satisfyingly wrap up the insanity that was the Immortal Hulk run, but Al Ewing didn't quite get there. A few pointless giant battle scenes and a whimper rather than a bang of an ending helped this volume just hit the "ok" mark. It would have taken an almost Shakespearean feat of writing to satisfyingly wrap up the insanity that was the Immortal Hulk run, but Al Ewing didn't quite get there. A few pointless giant battle scenes and a whimper rather than a bang of an ending helped this volume just hit the "ok" mark.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    After so many Al Ewing books cut down in their prime - for too long he couldn't get past Volume 2 without at least a rename or renumbering - it's a delight just to get to a Volume 10 and a planned conclusion. Especially when this particular journey was also disrupted by a pandemic shutting down the whole US comics industry, with disruptions rippling on to this day. Not to mention a widening political gap with main series artist Joe Bennett, the two of them nevertheless deciding to put their diff After so many Al Ewing books cut down in their prime - for too long he couldn't get past Volume 2 without at least a rename or renumbering - it's a delight just to get to a Volume 10 and a planned conclusion. Especially when this particular journey was also disrupted by a pandemic shutting down the whole US comics industry, with disruptions rippling on to this day. Not to mention a widening political gap with main series artist Joe Bennett, the two of them nevertheless deciding to put their differences on hold for the sake of their large green child before going their separate ways (a solution I endorse, but then I'm a terrible old centrist). So, aside from being glad that the series even made the landing, did they stick it? Well... mostly. Part of what made Immortal Hulk the most compelling Marvel series since Unbeatable Squirrel Girl wrapped was the way it took Hulk back to being a horror character, always a better fit than superheroics - and then the sheer variety of subgenres it could tie into that. That continues here, with body horror, identity horror, cosmic horror woven around and through each other as we reach the final confrontation. Yes, a couple of strands have been shelved by this point - the political horror is taking a bit of a back seat, likewise the environmental horror it brings in its wake - but there can't help but remain a political component when right to the end this is so much a story about toxic masculinity, a theodicy of the Hulk which understands quite what browbeating bullshit the rejoinder to Job was. And yet also one which, let's be clear, does feature a satisfactory amount of smashing. The resolution is necessarily provisional - this is corporate comics, after all, and there's a new Hulk #1 within the month. But if you ignore that, as I plan to, we end on a moment of hard-won peace after the gamma storms. Maybe not quite an ending up with the series' best moments, but certainly not an anticlimactic one either, and confirmation that this will be remembered as one of the great Hulk runs.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Bruce Banner's Alters try to save themselves from the Leader, and then prepare for the final battle with the true master of the Green Door, the One Below All. Al Ewing's masterpiece hits all the right marks in this final volume. It ties into ongoing plots in other books such as Avengers and Fantastic Four, while making sure that what's occurring here wraps up almost everything that's been left hanging since the earliest issues of the book. The final issue is a little bloated, with a framing seque Bruce Banner's Alters try to save themselves from the Leader, and then prepare for the final battle with the true master of the Green Door, the One Below All. Al Ewing's masterpiece hits all the right marks in this final volume. It ties into ongoing plots in other books such as Avengers and Fantastic Four, while making sure that what's occurring here wraps up almost everything that's been left hanging since the earliest issues of the book. The final issue is a little bloated, with a framing sequence that feels a little out of nowhere (even if it makes sense in retrospect), and there's a sense of 'putting all the toys back where they came from' for the next creative team, but thus is the nature of comics. Don't mourn that it's over and we're back to the status quo, just enjoy the ride while it lasts. Joe Bennett's on art for the most part. The less said about him the better at this point - the art's great, but that's all we're going to say. Immortal Hulk goes out with a smash. It's not a perfect ending, but it's damn well close.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Huh. I mean, maybe I need to reread this but it just kind of stopped? And The Leader & The Hulk are cousins? Overall, though, it did not land. Shame, the book was a heck of a ride until then.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robby

    While Ewing brings the metaphysical narrative to an appropriate conclusion of biblical proportions, some of the more interesting ideas from earlier arcs and issues, such as Hulk smashing capitalism and geometric aliens trying to alter the past, don't really resurface in any noticeable way. The "Devil-Hulk" concept seems to have been Ewing's main bag all along, but by this point in the story, he had gone to that well so many times that the ending feels somewhat inevitable. While Ewing brings the metaphysical narrative to an appropriate conclusion of biblical proportions, some of the more interesting ideas from earlier arcs and issues, such as Hulk smashing capitalism and geometric aliens trying to alter the past, don't really resurface in any noticeable way. The "Devil-Hulk" concept seems to have been Ewing's main bag all along, but by this point in the story, he had gone to that well so many times that the ending feels somewhat inevitable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pádraic

    Get in loser, we're (view spoiler)[extending the right hand of mercy (hide spoiler)] to (view spoiler)[deny (hide spoiler)] God. This meme doesn't really work, but anyway, this is a fittingly chaotic and sprawling and cosmically/bodily/psychologically horrifying conclusion to a spectacular series. Plus I'm always down for some anti-Avengers content. Get in loser, we're (view spoiler)[extending the right hand of mercy (hide spoiler)] to (view spoiler)[deny (hide spoiler)] God. This meme doesn't really work, but anyway, this is a fittingly chaotic and sprawling and cosmically/bodily/psychologically horrifying conclusion to a spectacular series. Plus I'm always down for some anti-Avengers content.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Josh399

    Welp, Hulk is over. Though this was a critically acclaimed series, it had already begun showing its age 20 issues ago. Its stretched plot lumbered under this book's accumulated cast, Banner's dissociative identities, and establish 3 (three!) separate spin-offs, not including (the excellent collection in Immortal Hulk Vol. 11: Apocrypha). Hulk has "bulked up" after the previous issues and the Jade Giant smashes the latest team of government stooges who try to control him. But while he shrugs off Welp, Hulk is over. Though this was a critically acclaimed series, it had already begun showing its age 20 issues ago. Its stretched plot lumbered under this book's accumulated cast, Banner's dissociative identities, and establish 3 (three!) separate spin-offs, not including (the excellent collection in Immortal Hulk Vol. 11: Apocrypha). Hulk has "bulked up" after the previous issues and the Jade Giant smashes the latest team of government stooges who try to control him. But while he shrugs off immense threats, those close to him are pushed to endanger themselves as Hulk envelops them in chaos. And that's what these issues are about: Who would die for you? Who would go to Hell for you? Nearly every character brought in has a special relationship with Hulk, and I loved their contributions previously: She-Hulk from the Avengers, Ben Grimm from the Fantastic Four, McGowan and Langstrom from Gamma Flight. And their parts are played well but tangle the story far too much. While Hulk smashes his opponents, fledging out his relationships and desires change our perception of Hulk in a way I dislike. If you, like I, were sold on an ineffable and alien Hulk, he is now brought low and cast down. He is pathetic and human at many points, whether it is reflecting on his abusive childhood, begging his girlfriend to come back, or ordering a drink. I bought into a primal hulk; the accumulation of Banner's Id and when the Immortal Hulk team decided that the Id, the basest part of us, could make complex decisions, it became terrifying. But seeing Hulk act like a whiny teenager (à la Peter Parker) diminishes the Hulk to a superego rather than a superhero (bah-dum-tzz!). Though Bennet's style is a little too realistic and busy for my taste, anyone with eyes can appreciate his dedication in terrifying splash pages. The final issue succeeds in making Ewing's story mesmerizing and satisfying. Purely to spite me—I assume—Ewing added to of my story pet peeves; pop-Kabbalah and comics-style journalism. The former is used jarringly; Are there really more than a handful of readers who know the Tree of Life symbology well enough to understand "chesed," "gevurah," and "golachab" without resorting to esoteric googling? Regarding journalism, it continues to irk me that comic book writers have not the smallest iota of how journalists act. It's kind of amazing to see a supposed journalist not even use a recording app, let alone a notepad. But these gripes are minor. Ultimately, my distaste for Hulk's ending is because this story is a bait-and-switch. After fighting social evils, his own past, and his gamma family, he now must escape the Avengers, save Banner, and defeat the Leader. In the midst of this, let's call it what it is, standard comic book story, Ewing appends a confrontation with the (view spoiler)[One Below All (hide spoiler)] in (view spoiler)[Gamma-Hell to ask it why pain must exist (hide spoiler)] . And I don't like either side of this, because a) The Immortal Hulk billed itself as being the opposite of standard and b) The final confrontation loses the plot. I don't just mean that it detracts from the story either; There is a cut-scene, background changes, and at least four different conversations occurring all while a fight fails to materialize. I understand the reason for it—this is a pivotal moment for all characters—but it's not a Hulk ending. In Marvel Comics, continuity is everything and it did not feel like the right time or theme. Finishing this book I feel satisfied, but don't have any urge to read the subsequent spin-offs (Defenders, Gamma Flight, and of course Hulk).

  10. 5 out of 5

    JCRD

    Y se acabó. Al Ewing ha terminado su etapa con el gladiador esmeralda. Es una despedida acorde con el resto de la serie y al mismo nivel que el resto de arcos, o sea, fantástica. A un nivel espectacular tanto en guión como dibujo (aquí puede que se haya superado el aspecto más grotesco). De lo mejor de Marvel de los últimos años, sin duda. Me ha gustado especialmente que Ewing haya decidido cerrar no con un clímax explosivo si no con una reflexión sobre el perdón y con las diferentes personalidade Y se acabó. Al Ewing ha terminado su etapa con el gladiador esmeralda. Es una despedida acorde con el resto de la serie y al mismo nivel que el resto de arcos, o sea, fantástica. A un nivel espectacular tanto en guión como dibujo (aquí puede que se haya superado el aspecto más grotesco). De lo mejor de Marvel de los últimos años, sin duda. Me ha gustado especialmente que Ewing haya decidido cerrar no con un clímax explosivo si no con una reflexión sobre el perdón y con las diferentes personalidades de Banner trabajando juntas por una vez. La segunda mitad de la serie me ha parecido un peldaño por debajo del resto, pero de todas formas ha tenido un nivelazo en todo. En algún momento caerá relectura para poder asimilar del todo las tramas del Líder y el One Below All, eso sí. No sé si le daré a la etapa de Donny Cates porque esto me parece un cierre muy bonito y he leído cosas que me tiran para atrás, pero ha sido mi primera etapa de Hulk y creo que no podría haber sido mejor. Le voy a guardar muchísimo cariño. Pd: lo de ser monsterfucker hasta que llegaron la peli de Venom y la Betty Banner de esta etapa no lo entendía. Pero ahora sí.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Despite me not remembering all of the details from this entire run, this was still a satisfying conclusion. Bruce and Betty discuss their relationship, the Hulk's true friends step up, and more explanation of the Hulk's nature is revealed. Another connection between Banner and Sterns is also revealed. The quotes before each issue were more appropriate than ever and I loved the style of issue 49, which contained large pin-ups accompanied by text and no dialogue. It gave that issue a heavy, ominou Despite me not remembering all of the details from this entire run, this was still a satisfying conclusion. Bruce and Betty discuss their relationship, the Hulk's true friends step up, and more explanation of the Hulk's nature is revealed. Another connection between Banner and Sterns is also revealed. The quotes before each issue were more appropriate than ever and I loved the style of issue 49, which contained large pin-ups accompanied by text and no dialogue. It gave that issue a heavy, ominous weight to it. All of the subplots aren't completely wrapped up and this is not a complete return to status quo. There's enough left open to make you want to keep reading. Overall, very satisfying and definitely my favorite thing Ewing has written (that I've read.) It's one of the most unique runs in the Hulk that always has a surprise.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Molly Lazer

    After being pretty down on the last few volumes of this series, I thought that the finale was pretty terrific. This is much quieter, much more introspective ending than the lead-up to it would have you expect, and I loved it for that reason. This series ended up having quite a lot to say about trauma, cycles of abuse within families, and the gift of mercy, both within and to oneself and for others. The idea that the "one below all" is actually god's hulk is pretty awesome too. My copy of this boo After being pretty down on the last few volumes of this series, I thought that the finale was pretty terrific. This is much quieter, much more introspective ending than the lead-up to it would have you expect, and I loved it for that reason. This series ended up having quite a lot to say about trauma, cycles of abuse within families, and the gift of mercy, both within and to oneself and for others. The idea that the "one below all" is actually god's hulk is pretty awesome too. My copy of this book did have the misplaced gatefold spread, which led to some confusion until I realized the error, verified where the spread was actually supposed to go, and actually cut out the pages and taped them in the proper place. It's a really unfortunately printing error because it ruins the most important and meaningful sequence in the whole series. But once it's fixed, the book reads masterfully.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Elkins

    I’ve read each of the issues that make up this volume (really every volume) of The Immortal Hulk, and I’ve read them all digitally. I mention this because digital can have an effect on tone and flow especially if one is reading in guided view. I’ve been blessed in that I’ve been able to read many issues on a larger screen without guided view. I’ll have to admit I was underwhelmed by the 50th final issue and unsure of what happened. I’m going to go back and read the final nine issues again, maybe I’ve read each of the issues that make up this volume (really every volume) of The Immortal Hulk, and I’ve read them all digitally. I mention this because digital can have an effect on tone and flow especially if one is reading in guided view. I’ve been blessed in that I’ve been able to read many issues on a larger screen without guided view. I’ll have to admit I was underwhelmed by the 50th final issue and unsure of what happened. I’m going to go back and read the final nine issues again, maybe in four days instead of four months, and I’ll appreciate it better. That being said Joe Bennett’s art is amazing as always, current issue identity politics seem to be absent, and Al Ewing cleared the slate for the next writer.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deshawn Vasquez

    So the run ends. I think given the way the series has built itself up, readers might've expected something more bombastic for a finale, but I always figured we'd get something a little more introspective, especially to wipe the slate relatively clean for the Donny Cates/Ryan Ottley rebranding. I'm thrilled with it. This might even be better than Peter David's run, but I also have a bias towards body horror and eldritch threats. A lesser writer might have made that penultimate issue feel padded, So the run ends. I think given the way the series has built itself up, readers might've expected something more bombastic for a finale, but I always figured we'd get something a little more introspective, especially to wipe the slate relatively clean for the Donny Cates/Ryan Ottley rebranding. I'm thrilled with it. This might even be better than Peter David's run, but I also have a bias towards body horror and eldritch threats. A lesser writer might have made that penultimate issue feel padded, or the flashbacks to the Stern family in the 20th century a little contrived, but it all gels.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    “No. Words aren’t hard. They’re small. Puny little boxes. They hide thoughts.” Pretty good finale but probably would’ve benefited from like rereading the previous volumes to refamiliarize myself with the mythos of this whole run. But then it also would’ve benefited from the trade not having a misprint in the final few pages so there’s that too. Eh, who am I kidding. I didn’t get it. But this was one of the all-time great comic book runs as far as I’m concerned and I have no doubt I’ll be reading i “No. Words aren’t hard. They’re small. Puny little boxes. They hide thoughts.” Pretty good finale but probably would’ve benefited from like rereading the previous volumes to refamiliarize myself with the mythos of this whole run. But then it also would’ve benefited from the trade not having a misprint in the final few pages so there’s that too. Eh, who am I kidding. I didn’t get it. But this was one of the all-time great comic book runs as far as I’m concerned and I have no doubt I’ll be reading it again and again in the future and one day it’ll click.

  16. 5 out of 5

    M

    Satisfactory conclusion that still leaves few threads dangling for the next creator to weave the future stories of the Hulk. Would have preferred a more clear cut answer to the mysterious thing from below. Seemed like in the end, it was nothing more than a psychological hell inside Bruce Banner. A Hell with which he finally makes peace and becomes more whole than ever before. That's a good enough ending for me. Satisfactory conclusion that still leaves few threads dangling for the next creator to weave the future stories of the Hulk. Would have preferred a more clear cut answer to the mysterious thing from below. Seemed like in the end, it was nothing more than a psychological hell inside Bruce Banner. A Hell with which he finally makes peace and becomes more whole than ever before. That's a good enough ending for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Pitkin

    An ok way to end the leader and the one below all storyline as we get Hulk and Banner getting to terms with each other. The idea of The One Above All and the One Below All being the same being feels weird kind of anti climatic in my opinion but still the imagery was nice and it does have some nice philosophy as it ties to the hulk.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    You know, I really wanted to enjoy this final Immortal Hulk trade (not counting the Apocrypha) , and for the most part I did. But then I got to the reprint of the final, extra-large issue, and some of the pages were out-of-order. That threw off the rhythm of the final reveals, and it affected my enjoyment of the story. Kind of a shame. It was quite good up until that point.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Xroldx

    And as above so below. A long run on the Hulk ends here with a big showdown between Hulk and The Avengers and a descent into hell. Ewing wrote an impressive story that ends with some revelations, more horror and a new start for Bruce Banner. I will reread the whole series because it's some of the best Marvel has ever published. And as above so below. A long run on the Hulk ends here with a big showdown between Hulk and The Avengers and a descent into hell. Ewing wrote an impressive story that ends with some revelations, more horror and a new start for Bruce Banner. I will reread the whole series because it's some of the best Marvel has ever published.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andres Pasten

    Termina esta gran etapa de Ewing a cargo de Hulk, dejando la vara bastante alta. Quedan ahora por revisar las miniseries que se derivan de este ultimo arco. Visualmente el arte de Bennett es tremendo. Altamente recomendado.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    This was not only the ending I didn't know I wanted for this run, but it was also the finale I needed to read for myself. I will admit that it took me a bit to adjust to the experimental format of issue #49, but ultimately I did decide it was the right format for the penultimate issue. This was not only the ending I didn't know I wanted for this run, but it was also the finale I needed to read for myself. I will admit that it took me a bit to adjust to the experimental format of issue #49, but ultimately I did decide it was the right format for the penultimate issue.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Mitchell

    A fitting end to a good series that never quite hit the potential I think it had. Still, this was a very strong 10 volumes that rarely got stale, and it made me invested in a character that I previously had no interest in.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Humble King

    Interesting one

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamil

    A bittersweet ending

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dimitrios

    4.25

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirilov Katsura

    No sé si merece 5 estrellas este volumen, pero la serie completa sí. Y esta es su valoración.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    So many hulks. 3.5.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Norman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chrissa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sammy Lawrence

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