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Lightning Falls in Love

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In her stunning twelfth poetry collection, Lightning Falls in Love, Laura Kasischke makes magic with a complex alchemy of nostalgia and fire, birdwing and sorrow. In new poems that search the murky lake for news of the past, she evokes unsayable trauma and gleans possibility. This is poetry that is existential in scope but grounded in the body, surreal yet suburban, reachi In her stunning twelfth poetry collection, Lightning Falls in Love, Laura Kasischke makes magic with a complex alchemy of nostalgia and fire, birdwing and sorrow. In new poems that search the murky lake for news of the past, she evokes unsayable trauma and gleans possibility. This is poetry that is existential in scope but grounded in the body, surreal yet suburban, reaching for clarity just beyond the fog of the day-to-day. Kasischke has found an entirely new way to spin beauty and pull breath from that which must be dredged up and revived before it can be left behind.


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In her stunning twelfth poetry collection, Lightning Falls in Love, Laura Kasischke makes magic with a complex alchemy of nostalgia and fire, birdwing and sorrow. In new poems that search the murky lake for news of the past, she evokes unsayable trauma and gleans possibility. This is poetry that is existential in scope but grounded in the body, surreal yet suburban, reachi In her stunning twelfth poetry collection, Lightning Falls in Love, Laura Kasischke makes magic with a complex alchemy of nostalgia and fire, birdwing and sorrow. In new poems that search the murky lake for news of the past, she evokes unsayable trauma and gleans possibility. This is poetry that is existential in scope but grounded in the body, surreal yet suburban, reaching for clarity just beyond the fog of the day-to-day. Kasischke has found an entirely new way to spin beauty and pull breath from that which must be dredged up and revived before it can be left behind.

33 review for Lightning Falls in Love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Keith Taylor

    Kasischke has been known and revered as an "image-maker," and this is certainly as it should be. But, even though she's published as many novels as collections of poetry, the poems have never before seemed to be structured as narratives. Yeah, there were often small stories imbedded in the poems or shaping the group of them (think of the brilliant and devastating "Space, in Chains"). But here it is the stories that seem to dominate; there are some poems where images just seem to fade away so the Kasischke has been known and revered as an "image-maker," and this is certainly as it should be. But, even though she's published as many novels as collections of poetry, the poems have never before seemed to be structured as narratives. Yeah, there were often small stories imbedded in the poems or shaping the group of them (think of the brilliant and devastating "Space, in Chains"). But here it is the stories that seem to dominate; there are some poems where images just seem to fade away so the story can be told directly. I think it's fabulous that at this point in her writing life, Kasischke has tried to do something different. The poems still often have that dark vision Kasischke is famous for. There are poems of abuse and assault, poems filled with fear and fragility. But the strong narrative changes things. Near the end of the book she assumes the oldest story in the Western world. Her poem is called "The odyssey." She rowed her little boat back home to Ithaca, alone And it becomes a poem about a woman aging. The changes in the body. The effort to come to terms with those changes. And then it becomes something else entirely -- a question occurs to her, just as it occurs to us, and no answer ever comes: Where is the bard who sings this song? I love the short jerky lines and irregular stanzas that have given so much life to Kasischke's poems for a long time. More recently, I've loved the sound play that ties them all together -- the string of rhymes and half rhymes hidden inside the lines. In this book she is willing to accent some of that even more -- for instance, there is one poem that is even written in rhyming couplets! And the very last poem in the book -- "A Prayer" -- is a celebration of her son and of the tentative fragile life they share in full knowledge that everywhere we go-- that every day, like this one, will be like every other, having never been never ending. So thank you. And, oh--I almost forgot to say: amen. This is a new tone in Kasischke's poetry. I find it big and expansive, as well as being hard-earned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan Leslie

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cornelio

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  6. 5 out of 5

    rosalind

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bibliophile10

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jacksen Gerard

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lulamae

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carly Ripp

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  14. 5 out of 5

    Coyah Balletta

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Daniel

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaullye

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cierra

  21. 5 out of 5

    Poetry.Shaman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Liabaud

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha Spear

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen McPherson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ceara Finchel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neil Strandberg

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  30. 5 out of 5

    Norman Sinel

  31. 5 out of 5

    Meneghin Livia

  32. 5 out of 5

    Ellice

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

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