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Geoffrey Chaucer (Chesterton's Biographies)

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The medieval poet as seen by a 20th century voice of art.


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The medieval poet as seen by a 20th century voice of art.

30 review for Geoffrey Chaucer (Chesterton's Biographies)

  1. 5 out of 5

    M.

    I do not know how to speak about Chesterton without sounding entirely biased, so you might as well forgive me. More than an historical account of the facts, it's a free essay on the artistic vision of Geoffrey Chaucer in general, beyond The Canterbury Tales, but also a picture of the medieval man, debunking the modernist myth. I wish I had not been so tired at the moment of reading it, but the quantity of interest quotes you can extract from it is incredible, and most of it, shows that Chaucer c I do not know how to speak about Chesterton without sounding entirely biased, so you might as well forgive me. More than an historical account of the facts, it's a free essay on the artistic vision of Geoffrey Chaucer in general, beyond The Canterbury Tales, but also a picture of the medieval man, debunking the modernist myth. I wish I had not been so tired at the moment of reading it, but the quantity of interest quotes you can extract from it is incredible, and most of it, shows that Chaucer can remain very actual and understood, above all. As well as it is a perfect example of Chesterton's brilliant mind.

  2. 5 out of 5

    José Cárdenas

    No importa si tienes poco interés por Chaucer, o si no te interesan las biografías: es Chesterton comentando sus propias ideas literarias, religiosas y políticas, y haciéndolo del mejor modo posible. Y además comenta los cuentos de Canterbury.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ah Poozi

    I would be writing this review in French, if Chaucer had not chosen to write in English. I chose to read this book because Chesterton wrote it, not because he chose to write it about Chaucer. And there is more Chesterton here than Chaucer. But, after reading it, I do have a much wider appreciation of the medieval poet and medievalism as a whole. Chesterton writes why he thinks Chaucer is great (calling him "father of all our poets" and "grandfather of all our hundred million novelists"); paints a I would be writing this review in French, if Chaucer had not chosen to write in English. I chose to read this book because Chesterton wrote it, not because he chose to write it about Chaucer. And there is more Chesterton here than Chaucer. But, after reading it, I do have a much wider appreciation of the medieval poet and medievalism as a whole. Chesterton writes why he thinks Chaucer is great (calling him "father of all our poets" and "grandfather of all our hundred million novelists"); paints a picture of the time of Chaucer and medievalism (arguing medievalism was not very dark); touches on his private/public life (quickly); and tackles various topics throughout including romance and chivalry, Chaucer's humor, progressivism, the Renaissance (arguing medievalism was "more rational, or rationalistic"), and much more while of course defending his (and Chaucer's) Catholicism throughout. "Those strangely fanatical historians, who would darken the whole medieval landscape, have to give up Chaucer in despair; because he is obviously not despairing. His mere voice hailing us from a distance has the abruptness of a startling whistle or halloo; a blast blowing away all their artificially concocted atmosphere of gas and gloom. It is as if we opened the door of an ogre's oven, in which we were told that everybody was being roasted alive, and heard a clear, cheery but educated voice remarking that it was a fine day."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Typically. Chestertonian. A prelude to reading the Canterbury Tales.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James Bowman

    It holds up well as both literary and cultural crticism Chesterton may be largely ignored today other than for the BBC TV series based upon his Father Brown , yet his ruminations upon literature, culture and society remain relevant and valuable today. Read this work and gain a deeper appreciation of Cancer and his Canterbury Tales.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Actually a whole lot better than I thought it would be. I picked it up because I am re-reading Chaucer and wanted to get a better feel for the guy and his times. It turned out to be a pretty good read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    Some interesting comments on late medievalism and the market.

  8. 4 out of 5

    EndeavourPress4

    This book is published by Albion Press. Albion Press is an imprint of Endeavour Press.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Syme

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna Speer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steph

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rodney Jones

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  17. 4 out of 5

    amapola

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Patchin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  20. 4 out of 5

    David William Allman

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peter Floriani

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Bregenzer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jim Coughenour

  24. 5 out of 5

    Terence

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Bear

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  28. 5 out of 5

    John

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 5 out of 5

    J. Brandon

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