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INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER! A vivid trip through the mind of the top professional wrestler in the business—a nobody from nowhere who achieved his ambitions and walked away with the gold and the girl of his dreams. Ride alongside Jon Moxley as he retraces some of the highways traveled on his remarkable journey. Revel in the never-before-told stories about his early life in INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER! A vivid trip through the mind of the top professional wrestler in the business—a nobody from nowhere who achieved his ambitions and walked away with the gold and the girl of his dreams. Ride alongside Jon Moxley as he retraces some of the highways traveled on his remarkable journey. Revel in the never-before-told stories about his early life in Cincinnati, Ohio; the gritty independent wrestling scene where he cut his teeth; the complicated corporate landscape of the WWE where he bucked against authority; and the rebellious upstart AEW, where he won the championship in 2020 and was finally free to achieve the vision of the wrestler he’d always wanted to be. With plenty of pitstops and revelatory insights, including grisly ultraviolent encounters, crazy characters who became lifelong friends, and his unforgettable matches in Japan, MOX is the riveting account of the life of a brawler. It is a tale written in blood and soaked in debauchery, with a good dose of wisdom accumulated along the way. More than a backstage pass into the arena, MOX is a ticket into the ring. Once inside, you’ll never look at pro wrestling the same again.


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INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER! A vivid trip through the mind of the top professional wrestler in the business—a nobody from nowhere who achieved his ambitions and walked away with the gold and the girl of his dreams. Ride alongside Jon Moxley as he retraces some of the highways traveled on his remarkable journey. Revel in the never-before-told stories about his early life in INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER! A vivid trip through the mind of the top professional wrestler in the business—a nobody from nowhere who achieved his ambitions and walked away with the gold and the girl of his dreams. Ride alongside Jon Moxley as he retraces some of the highways traveled on his remarkable journey. Revel in the never-before-told stories about his early life in Cincinnati, Ohio; the gritty independent wrestling scene where he cut his teeth; the complicated corporate landscape of the WWE where he bucked against authority; and the rebellious upstart AEW, where he won the championship in 2020 and was finally free to achieve the vision of the wrestler he’d always wanted to be. With plenty of pitstops and revelatory insights, including grisly ultraviolent encounters, crazy characters who became lifelong friends, and his unforgettable matches in Japan, MOX is the riveting account of the life of a brawler. It is a tale written in blood and soaked in debauchery, with a good dose of wisdom accumulated along the way. More than a backstage pass into the arena, MOX is a ticket into the ring. Once inside, you’ll never look at pro wrestling the same again.

30 review for MOX

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    You can hear his voice in every word. Either a great argument against ghostwriting, or a great example of ghostwriting. It's wrestling. You'll never really know. You can hear his voice in every word. Either a great argument against ghostwriting, or a great example of ghostwriting. It's wrestling. You'll never really know.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    Hey! I received this book weeks before its release date! First time's that ever happened to me from pre-ordering something! Jon Moxley is one of my favorite wrestlers. I first saw him at a DGUSA show,the one where he almost cut his nipple off. He was the only Shield guy I was familiar with when they debuted in WWE in 2012. He was the off-the-chain singles guy of the group while Rollins and Reigns were the tag team. He was definitely The Shield's best talker. A couple of years after The Shield's d Hey! I received this book weeks before its release date! First time's that ever happened to me from pre-ordering something! Jon Moxley is one of my favorite wrestlers. I first saw him at a DGUSA show,the one where he almost cut his nipple off. He was the only Shield guy I was familiar with when they debuted in WWE in 2012. He was the off-the-chain singles guy of the group while Rollins and Reigns were the tag team. He was definitely The Shield's best talker. A couple of years after The Shield's disbandment Dean Ambrose (Jon Moxley's name in WWE) won the WWE World Heavyweight Championship and had an excellent run with it as the face of SmackDown after the 2016 brand split. That, to me, was WWE's last decent year. Jon Moxley, frustrated with WWE creative, quit in early 2019 and joined the new company AEW and debuted at the end of their very first show which is one of my favorite wrestling moments of all time. Jon Moxley is killing it now, free to do wrestling the way he wants and where he wants. Amidst this new found freedom Jon Moxley decided to write a book much in the same way that he likes to do his wrestling promos: without any help whatsoever. There is no doubt that Moxley wrote this book himself. If you've ever heard him in a podcast you will know that the book is written in his voice. There is no chronology in Mox. Moxley chose the most important moments in his life, wrote about them in a stream-of-consciousness manner, then placed the chapters in a more-or-less random order. Every now and then he'll have a mini-chapter where he talks about a favorite album (Spin It Up) or movie (Flick Pick). He also includes several jokes told to him by Claudio. I wish he would have included chapters on his favorite books because he said he was a reader on his wife Renee's podcast (interesting photo of her is included in this book). Unfortunately, while Jon Moxley is a very good storyteller and his stories are interesting, I would not consider Mox one of the best wrestling books of all time. It does not contain enough details and/or humor like the best of the best of wrestling literature: Chris Jericho's first two books, Bret Hart's Hitman, or Mick Foley's Have a Nice Day.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Akshay Oommen

    A book that gives us a deeper insight into the man behind the unscripted violence - who also happens to be a man who is very particular about the composition of his sandwiches? Yes, please! This book is an electrifying walk down memory lane that catalogues some of Moxley's finest moments in his professional wrestling career (which as a seasoned fan, you should be mostly familiar with) while at the same time, laying bare the hardships he faced growing up, his first foray into professional wrestling A book that gives us a deeper insight into the man behind the unscripted violence - who also happens to be a man who is very particular about the composition of his sandwiches? Yes, please! This book is an electrifying walk down memory lane that catalogues some of Moxley's finest moments in his professional wrestling career (which as a seasoned fan, you should be mostly familiar with) while at the same time, laying bare the hardships he faced growing up, his first foray into professional wrestling in 2003, his admiration for Les Thatcher, the root behind his burning appetite for deathmatches - and more. I've been a big fan of Mox since his debut in the SHIELD in 2012. I've had a privilege to watch him at a WWE Live Show in Dubai in 2016 as well. And as a big fan, re-reading about the legendary moment he made his way through the AE-dub crowd at DoN 2019 and downed Jericho and Omega, gave me the chills. (Probably going to have to re-watch that clip for the thousand-th time) I'm not sure how accessible this book is going to be to anyone not in touch with the professional wrestling business. It might be a little too overwhelming and out of context at points(and if ultra violence, blood and human beings smacking each other with fluorescent tube lights gets your tummy queasy, you might want to steer COMPLETELY clear of this book). However, as an AE-dub fan and a MOX fan, this book was an absolute blast. PS: At the time of writing this review, Jon has pulled out from all upcoming AEW shows and admitted himself into a rehab program. We all know you're going to come out of this stronger and better than ever! We love you! Looking to hear 'Wild Thing' play at an AE-dub show as soon as possible.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Micchi Kins

    The two things you need to know about me for this review: 1) I don't read very much nonfiction, especially not biographies. I'm mainly a fiction reader, with a lean towards the speculative. 2) I fucking love pro wrestling. In theory, this book is the hottest of hot messes. There's nothing even approaching linear to this narrative. There are a lot, and I do mean A LOT, of ellipses. There are more tangents than a college level math class. The book has SIDEBARS, for fuck's sake, that don't even relate The two things you need to know about me for this review: 1) I don't read very much nonfiction, especially not biographies. I'm mainly a fiction reader, with a lean towards the speculative. 2) I fucking love pro wrestling. In theory, this book is the hottest of hot messes. There's nothing even approaching linear to this narrative. There are a lot, and I do mean A LOT, of ellipses. There are more tangents than a college level math class. The book has SIDEBARS, for fuck's sake, that don't even relate to anything else going on around them! But here's the thing: It works. Look, I busted out highlighters to annotate this book, okay. Jon Moxley is a storyteller, and he's damn good at it. This book reads like you're sitting down with Mox, hanging by a big ass bonfire, swapping stories. At times it is hilarious, it is anger-inducing, it is heartbreaking, it is joyful, and it is beautiful. There is vulnerability here, and the lack of a linear timeline only heightens that. Like when someone's really opening up to you, and they suddenly hard cut to a different story because it's getting too real...but they always come back, and dive in a little deeper, and show a little more. This book is something really special. I am so glad to have read it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    What the hell did I just read

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    I have read many pro wrestling memoirs but this one is different, better, because Jon Moxley takes you inside the ring and inside his mind. Vulnerable. Violent. Imperfect. There are typos and run on sentences, but they’re worth it. I understand what drives athletes more today than I did yesterday because of Moxley’s prose.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This would have been an absolute banger if it had had literally one harsh edit. As it stands it's fun and good, and Mox has a great point of view and sense of style. This would have been an absolute banger if it had had literally one harsh edit. As it stands it's fun and good, and Mox has a great point of view and sense of style.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris Valentine

    At first I thought the title of this book was too close to 'Cash' by Johnny Cash, who as far as I'm concerned should be the first and last person whose autobiography is just their name. However, it's Jon Moxley, so I'll allow it. This book is second only to maybe Bret Hart's 'Hitman,' but while Bret, brilliant as he is, spends a lot of time talking about how sad he was to cheat on his wife and how difficult it was to fuck tons of waitresses while he was on the road, Jon is a bit more clear-sighte At first I thought the title of this book was too close to 'Cash' by Johnny Cash, who as far as I'm concerned should be the first and last person whose autobiography is just their name. However, it's Jon Moxley, so I'll allow it. This book is second only to maybe Bret Hart's 'Hitman,' but while Bret, brilliant as he is, spends a lot of time talking about how sad he was to cheat on his wife and how difficult it was to fuck tons of waitresses while he was on the road, Jon is a bit more clear-sighted about himself and what he does. You get a real sense that Jon Moxley is a man of deep intelligence and sensitivity. It's a bit like being cornered at the end of the bar by a loquacious drunk who wants to tell you all the stories of the wild shit that's happened to him and his opinions on everything in the world. Except it's not all bullshit.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brett Ekblad

    What I really enjoyed is that as chaotic, fast paced and seemingly random coalition of chapters merges well together. Never boring and never lets up, it's an exciting, fun and tragic read into the mind of this one of a kind professional wrestler. Shout out to the album spins and Claudio jokes. What I really enjoyed is that as chaotic, fast paced and seemingly random coalition of chapters merges well together. Never boring and never lets up, it's an exciting, fun and tragic read into the mind of this one of a kind professional wrestler. Shout out to the album spins and Claudio jokes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jason Weber

    3.5 stars If it involves wrestling or MMA I’ll probably read it! Lol That being said, I think it may be a little premature for Moxley’s story. It jumps around a lot, which was kind of annoying. An fairly quick, easy read, definitely check it out if you are a wrestling/Dean Ambrose/Jon Moxley fan.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Josh Reaves

    Not good The book seems like it was originally a school essay assigned to a 14 year old that they got a C on. The book jumps around for no reason, there are random interludes about popular books and music that add nothing. This should have been a blog of random ramblings. I like Mox less after having read this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dove Daniel

    This book was kind of a hot mess. Many have commented that it sounds like Mox is talking straight to you, complete with wild tangents, and that is true, but this is not necessarily a good thing for a book. Someone else commented that it reads like a teen’s post on reddit, and I agree wholeheartedly. There are spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes everywhere you look. For some reason he uses “F’n” and “MFer” instead of the full words most of the time, but not consistently. Mox doesn’t seem to This book was kind of a hot mess. Many have commented that it sounds like Mox is talking straight to you, complete with wild tangents, and that is true, but this is not necessarily a good thing for a book. Someone else commented that it reads like a teen’s post on reddit, and I agree wholeheartedly. There are spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes everywhere you look. For some reason he uses “F’n” and “MFer” instead of the full words most of the time, but not consistently. Mox doesn’t seem to believe in any punctuation between speech marks unless it’s an exclamation or question mark. Chapter two is a multi-page single paragraph. Basically, what I’m saying is, this book badly needs a competent editor. Sometimes I (uppercase i) or l (lowercase L) are substituted for each other or the number 1, which makes me wonder if the physical book is an easier read and the ebook is a terrible scan that wasn’t checked particularly well before being approved. It doesn’t explain the inconsistent approach to swearing, but for all I know chapter two is formatted into clean, readable paragraphs, and the missing punctuation that ticked me off is actually present in the real book. (Though in this day and age, why would they scan in a book when Mox notes that he wrote it on Reneé’s Mac?) MOX tells an interesting story, I loved the bits about CZW, (being one of the people who, after seeing Dean Ambrose on WWE for the first time, went back to his indie days to see what everyone was raving about), and getting backstage insight into WWE is always interesting. I just wish the structure was a little more coherent. I didn’t read this all in one sitting, so jumping around the timeline endlessly made me keep forgetting what backstory we’d found out eight chapters ago that was relevant now in this chapter, because there had been a bunch of other side tangents. I personally prefer a more linear autobiography. While this was interesting, and clearly written by Mox or the most talented ghost-writer in the world (grammar aside), it doesn’t have that thing that will make me re-read it. It wasn’t worth the very high price tag either. It was an interesting read, but a bit of editing would have made it far more enjoyable. I wasn’t a huge fan of reading about the matches “in character”. The reason I read these autobiographies is to peek behind the curtain, and to read about it from the character’s point of view doesn’t do that. It just reiterates what I already saw on TV. Too many downsides against the interesting tales, I’m afraid. Wait for it to drop in price before buying it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Nowowiejski

    Picked up at the airport on a whim - the chapter on sandwiches and the pillars of proper sandwich assembly is a revelation - about time somebody said it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shane M.

    Mox's Voice A great book where Mox's voice rings out loudly. One of the best wrestling books I've read in a long time, up there with Foley and Jericho. Mox's Voice A great book where Mox's voice rings out loudly. One of the best wrestling books I've read in a long time, up there with Foley and Jericho.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robb Strothman

    Great book....easy to read. Could practically hear Mox's voice through his writing. Great book....easy to read. Could practically hear Mox's voice through his writing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    In 2019, Moxley shocked the world by showing up at the conclusion of the main event of AEW’s first show, Double or Nothing, attacking Kenny Omega and Chris Jericho. But, how did he get there? Why did one of WWE’s biggest stars walk away from millions only to sign with an unproven upstart company in AEW? Well, it’s a bit of a long story and in his new book, MOX, Moxley tells of his unconventional rise to prominence and the subsequent frustrations that led to him looking for an escape out from ins In 2019, Moxley shocked the world by showing up at the conclusion of the main event of AEW’s first show, Double or Nothing, attacking Kenny Omega and Chris Jericho. But, how did he get there? Why did one of WWE’s biggest stars walk away from millions only to sign with an unproven upstart company in AEW? Well, it’s a bit of a long story and in his new book, MOX, Moxley tells of his unconventional rise to prominence and the subsequent frustrations that led to him looking for an escape out from inside Vince McMahon’s wrestling empire. Getting his start under the tutelage of Les Thatcher and Cody Hawk through Cincinnati’s Heartland Wrestling Association (HWA) in the early 2000s, Moxley would find himself traveling the US independent scene gaining experience under various promotions including IWA, Dragon Gate USA, and most notably CZW, where he would nurture his love and appreciation for death match wrestling. Moxley tells several harrowing stories about his time in CZW including being booked on the 2009 Tournament of Death card in which Nick Gage nearly lost his life following a light tube spot that went horrifically wrong. Moxley speaks about signing his developmental deal with WWE in early 2011 and his time spent in FCW (Florida Championship Wrestling) establishing white-hot programs with both Seth Rollins and later, William Regal. His frustrations with the creative process were nothing new by the time he had decided to leave in 2019 given his nearly year-long period on the bench in 2012 prior to being hooked up with Seth Rollins and Roman Reigns to form The Shield. While Moxley does not have an ax to grind per se, his frustrations with WWE and how it is run were key factors in his decision to leave in 2019. He isn’t completely bitter about his time there, but his gripes are more than fair. Having to walk on eggshells in his early days where the slightest turn of phrase could get you in trouble with the wrong people and the games in which those powerful people play could lead to a constant state of unease for any performer. Despite all the success he achieved, the negatives would outweigh the positives. A disastrous heel turn in late 2018 would push him out the door at the end of his contract the following April. Moxley could have elaborated more on his frustrations about the angle, but if you were watching the programming at the time, it wouldn’t be hard to see for yourself just how bad it was. There isn’t a lot in here about his time in AEW if you’re looking for insight into his nearly year-long title reign. He speaks candidly about his work with Brodie Lee surrounding their title program at 2020’s Double or Nothing, and the awful conclusion to the Exploding Barbed Wire Death Match with Kenny but nothing really about his programs with MJF or Eddie, which I would have liked. The book itself isn’t presented in a linear fashion, with stories and moments from Jon’s career told out of order. That being said, it still flows well and is easily digestible given that it’s written in more of a conversational style rather than a blow-by-blow retelling of Moxley’s career through the eyes of a ghostwriter or third party. That works for most of the book, but there were other moments where it felt forced and grating. While it may have been of interest to some people, I could have done without the chapter breaks made up of Jon’s favorite movies, albums, and even one consisting of how to construct the perfect sandwich. MOX is a good read that offers a peek into the mind of a performer who would easily fit in in just about any era in wrestling’s past let alone where he currently is in the present. I would have liked a bit more depth, but I would still recommend giving it a read if you’re even slightly curious. Reviewed for POST Wrestling.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chaos & Confetti

    Mox is an autobiographical look at pieces of the life of Jon Moxley, professional wrestler and lover of violence. As expected, Moxley delves into his personal life and wrestling career but in a way I didn’t see coming. Reading this book felt like having Moxley speak right to me. Having heard him give interviews before and deliver countless wrestling promos, his voice came through perfectly. The book bordered on stream of consciousness, jumping around to different points in Moxley’s life and somet Mox is an autobiographical look at pieces of the life of Jon Moxley, professional wrestler and lover of violence. As expected, Moxley delves into his personal life and wrestling career but in a way I didn’t see coming. Reading this book felt like having Moxley speak right to me. Having heard him give interviews before and deliver countless wrestling promos, his voice came through perfectly. The book bordered on stream of consciousness, jumping around to different points in Moxley’s life and sometimes breaking for tangents on music, movies, and sandwiches. The nonlinear approach works surprisingly well, with Moxley tying unique points in his life together and showcasing his evolution as a performer and person, all while making you feel special for getting a glimpse into the life of someone so guarded. I also enjoyed how the author would insert chapters about where he was mentally as he wrote the book: dealing with the pandemic, mourning the loss of a friend, relishing in what former teachers would think if they knew he turned out to be a successful, married man who spent his free time working on his book. Like many other readers, I’m sure, I picked up Mox because of Moxley’s wrestling career and my enjoyment of his in-ring and character work. Moxley finds the perfect blend of exposing the theatrical world behind wrestling while still making it feel real. He talks about his training, learning the ins-and-outs of selling, his ideas of what makes a good match, creating stories through his work, and the backstage politics of it all. Moxley lays it on the table that wrestling in a creative production which is predetermined, but then he goes deeper into his character work or describes the matches themselves, and a switch subtly flips. Moxley admits to losing himself in his character when working and it bleeds into his writing. When describing matches or recounting promos and storylines, you feel as if you’re hearing from Dean Ambrose or Jon Moxley the characters. The man across the ring is no longer a fellow performer, but a man who needs to be hurt. Moxley becomes a fighter looking to stay alive and relishing in the pain of others. I appreciate how honest and upfront Moxley is about his personal trials and demons. I hope the man behind the book is doing well on his continuing journey of keeping them in control and finding the proper and hopefully safe ways to express himself and enjoy life. This autobiography will work especially well for wrestling and Jon Moxley fans, but I think it will provide a fascinating and worthwhile look into a unique individual’s life for any reader. It’s a messy book that perfectly captures the messy life of Jon Moxley. * For those it matters to: Mox mostly covers Jon Moxley’s early career and time in the WWE and its developmental systems. Hopefully, one day he’ll write more about AEW, but his book only offers a brief glimpse into that chapter of his life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    MOX is the most intimate pro wrestling memoir I've read because it's the most unique. I heard Jon Moxley's (aka Jonathan Good) voice in my head as I read. He describes his process: Every now and then, when he felt so inclined, he sat down at his wife's MacBook and wrote about something. That's another unique attribute of MOX: It's nonlinear. This isn't the usual "I was born on…" autobiography. Mox ping-pongs from year to year, subject to subject, wrestling company to wrestling company, person to MOX is the most intimate pro wrestling memoir I've read because it's the most unique. I heard Jon Moxley's (aka Jonathan Good) voice in my head as I read. He describes his process: Every now and then, when he felt so inclined, he sat down at his wife's MacBook and wrote about something. That's another unique attribute of MOX: It's nonlinear. This isn't the usual "I was born on…" autobiography. Mox ping-pongs from year to year, subject to subject, wrestling company to wrestling company, person to person as he writes. You get the impression as you read that Mox either had something on his mind when he sat down to write, or he sat down and said, "Shit, I'm on a deadline. What the F am I going to write about today?" Mox's voice is yet another unique aspect of his titular memoir. He'll let loose with swear words in one sentence then, a sentence or a few words and the same sentence later, he'll write "I was so F'n pissed." Why not drop the F-bomb? Or why not stick to "F" for the entire book? Maybe he had a strict limit on how often he could swear, but as you'll learn, Mox isn't keen on being told what to do. On being given limits. He holds back nothing in his anger with WWE's current product and the majority of his run there, yet he gives respect and love where it's due. If you're reading this review because you've read MOX or you want to read the book, you're a pro wrestling fan. That's what Mox loves. He loves professional wrestling, and he shares the nuts and bolts of his passion more than any other wrestler in any other memoir I've read. Do you know how many steps wrestlers take when they run the ropes, or how they slow their momentum just enough before hitting a rope to keep their balance in case a rope snaps or a turnbuckle breaks and the ring falls apart? I love pro wrestling and know plenty of details, but I didn't know half of what Mox shares in his book. The most important detail Mox shares is that of pro wrestling: what it is, why he loves it, how it's changed his life. Seeing the art of wrestling through his eyes rekindled some of the passion I've lost for it in recent years. MOX is a beautiful and emotional story. I hope he writes another book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Mox is the story of a guy who really loves wrestling and is intended for both fans as well as non fans. It's one of those books that most nonwrestling won't understand and the way it flows is disjointed yet somehow it works. The interesting thing is that the book was written by the man himself which means if you're a fan, you can hear his voice in your head as you're reading it. Included here are random entries about his favorite films and music. The idea is to tell the story his way so you don Mox is the story of a guy who really loves wrestling and is intended for both fans as well as non fans. It's one of those books that most nonwrestling won't understand and the way it flows is disjointed yet somehow it works. The interesting thing is that the book was written by the man himself which means if you're a fan, you can hear his voice in your head as you're reading it. Included here are random entries about his favorite films and music. The idea is to tell the story his way so you don't get a lot of back story on his childhood or even his life before wrestling but that's not a bad thing. What comes across well is his love of wrestling and the feeling of being in prison throughout his final days in WWE. There's no dirt here, and Mox points out it's not that kind of book. It easily could have been but it would have taken away from the overall feel of the book and the story that Mox is trying to tell. You do get bits and pieces of his time in HWA, his training as well as some matches from CZW.The only way to desctibe the book is it feels like Mox is sitting next to you in a bar telling you about key moments in his life. It's an interesting approach that works and you don't feel burdened by a bunch of facts that have no real bearing on the book. It's an interesting book that shouldn't work but Mox is an interesting guy and there a lot of interesting moments here. If you've been a from his days in HWA or his recent work with AEW there's something here for everyone, but if you're not a fan of wrestling or Mox then there's really no point in reading this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    G.E. Newbegin

    An interesting read that didn't initially grab me. In some ways, I felt it was poorly written -- kind of messy, all over the shop. I soon realised it was intentionally written that way. There is a single tale here, unfolding, but it's not in a consecutive timeline. And it really suits the book, as it's indicative of Moxley himself, who is somewhat erratic in much the same way. Of course, as a book about a wrestler, this is a wrestling book, but it's less about wrestling than it is about who Jon M An interesting read that didn't initially grab me. In some ways, I felt it was poorly written -- kind of messy, all over the shop. I soon realised it was intentionally written that way. There is a single tale here, unfolding, but it's not in a consecutive timeline. And it really suits the book, as it's indicative of Moxley himself, who is somewhat erratic in much the same way. Of course, as a book about a wrestler, this is a wrestling book, but it's less about wrestling than it is about who Jon Moxley is and what made him. There are plenty of very cool wrestling stories in here, but they really are not the focus. This isn't a story about what it's like to work in WWE or AEW (or any of the indies, for that matter), it's Jon Moxley's story, and that's it. For that reason, I feel it will only appeal to wrestling fans, and more specifically, to fans of Jon Moxley. But I'm pretty sure that's all it's intended to be... It really doesn't try to be anything else.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Bohl

    Not an artistic masterpiece, but entertaining from beginning to end. I’m talking about the book, not wrestling. There was a decade where WWE wrestlers put out “biographies” that felt like canned WWE products. The past couple years of wrestling a few more candid biographies have come out that illuminate the industry more than was previously allowed. This book is a lot of things; Moxley giving recommendations on music and movies, detailing his road in wrestling, providing commentary on the industry Not an artistic masterpiece, but entertaining from beginning to end. I’m talking about the book, not wrestling. There was a decade where WWE wrestlers put out “biographies” that felt like canned WWE products. The past couple years of wrestling a few more candid biographies have come out that illuminate the industry more than was previously allowed. This book is a lot of things; Moxley giving recommendations on music and movies, detailing his road in wrestling, providing commentary on the industry, and some life advice that’s at times somewhat poignant. A biased wrestling fan gives it 4 stars.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Completely enthralling. Couldn’t put this down, it’s not very long but Jon Moxley has a gift. I’m so glad he chose to write this and even moreso that it wasn’t under the WWE umbrella as their official biographies/autobiographies have a tendency to be short, sweet and somewhat sterile. Mox’s book is on par with Foley’s first or Bret Hart’s. He’s blunt, uncensored & completely honest about his life, experiences and mood throughout his career. Also, the love he has for Grant (Danny Havoc) and Brodi Completely enthralling. Couldn’t put this down, it’s not very long but Jon Moxley has a gift. I’m so glad he chose to write this and even moreso that it wasn’t under the WWE umbrella as their official biographies/autobiographies have a tendency to be short, sweet and somewhat sterile. Mox’s book is on par with Foley’s first or Bret Hart’s. He’s blunt, uncensored & completely honest about his life, experiences and mood throughout his career. Also, the love he has for Grant (Danny Havoc) and Brodie Lee shines when he writes about them. He packed a lot into these pages. If you’re a wrestling fan pick this up.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo Yepez

    I heard Moxley talk about his book on Talk is Jericho and decided to read it because the whole writing process sounded insane. Despite not having a definite chronology and random chapters that don't have anything to do with the previous chapter, or the next chapter, or really any other chapter, it all works in the end. If you've heard Jon Moxley talk, you'll be reading the book in his voice, that's how "like him" the book is written. The anecdotes catch you and make you want to keep reading, and I heard Moxley talk about his book on Talk is Jericho and decided to read it because the whole writing process sounded insane. Despite not having a definite chronology and random chapters that don't have anything to do with the previous chapter, or the next chapter, or really any other chapter, it all works in the end. If you've heard Jon Moxley talk, you'll be reading the book in his voice, that's how "like him" the book is written. The anecdotes catch you and make you want to keep reading, and the whole book is a testament to how much damage some human bodies can (willingly) absorb and remain operational. Also, by the end of the book you'll have learned some good (bad) dad jokes and the science between making tasty and structurally-sound sandwiches.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anirban

    I would say that this was one of the books I enjoyed reading the most this year. I'm not one for non-fiction, but when it's a book about a person I'm a fan of, it's a bit special. For those who don't know, Mox is the autobiography of Jon Moxley, one of t most special professional wrestlers of this day and age. If you're a wrestling fan, this is one book that you can't miss this year. I would say that this was one of the books I enjoyed reading the most this year. I'm not one for non-fiction, but when it's a book about a person I'm a fan of, it's a bit special. For those who don't know, Mox is the autobiography of Jon Moxley, one of t most special professional wrestlers of this day and age. If you're a wrestling fan, this is one book that you can't miss this year.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jean Snow

    This was a fantastically engaging read, and what I liked the most about it is that it really comes off as something that Moxley wrote himself, and so reading it, you really feel like he's there with you, telling you all these stories directly. It's funny, it's sad, it has interesting backstories on things, and just makes for an enjoyable trip in Moxley's mind. Well worth reading. This was a fantastically engaging read, and what I liked the most about it is that it really comes off as something that Moxley wrote himself, and so reading it, you really feel like he's there with you, telling you all these stories directly. It's funny, it's sad, it has interesting backstories on things, and just makes for an enjoyable trip in Moxley's mind. Well worth reading.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Rivera

    It's Jon F*ckin' Moxley, of course this was gonna get 5 stars! A quick, entertaining read that gives an unapologetic, authentic, and solid look into who Mox is inside and outside the squared circle It's Jon F*ckin' Moxley, of course this was gonna get 5 stars! A quick, entertaining read that gives an unapologetic, authentic, and solid look into who Mox is inside and outside the squared circle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chantal Riley

    There is no doubt that Mox is one of the best pro wrestlers of our generation. He takes no prisoners, doesn’t care about the social hype and just lives the craft - exactly like this book is. Fans will love it & if you’re just getting into pro wrestling fandom, it is a must-read

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    This was fun.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mac

    It's really good. He says "bitch" a lot. It's really good. He says "bitch" a lot.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Black

    Very Entertaining

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