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America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility

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International students and immigrants have been the secret ingredient in America’s recipe for global success. America Calling shares one immigrant’s story, a tale that reflects millions more, and shows us why preventing the world’s best and brightest from seeking the American Dream will put this country’s future in jeopardy. Growing up in middle-class India, Rajika Bhandari International students and immigrants have been the secret ingredient in America’s recipe for global success. America Calling shares one immigrant’s story, a tale that reflects millions more, and shows us why preventing the world’s best and brightest from seeking the American Dream will put this country’s future in jeopardy. Growing up in middle-class India, Rajika Bhandari has seen generations of her family look westward, where an American education means status and success. But she resists the lure of America because those who left never return; they all become flies trapped in honey in a land of opportunity. As a young woman, however, she finds herself heading to a US university to study, following her heart and a relationship. When that relationship ends and she fails in her attempt to move back to India as a foreign-educated woman, she returns to the US and finds herself in a job where the personal is political and professional: she is immersed in the lives of international students who come to America from over 200 countries, the universities that attract them, and the tangled web of immigration that a student must navigate. An unflinching and insightful narrative that explores the global appeal of a Made-in-America education that is a bridge to America’s successful past and to its future, America Calling is both a deeply personal story of Bhandari’s search for her place and voice, and an incisive analysis of America’s relationship with the rest of the world through the most powerful tool of diplomacy: education. At a time of growing nationalism, a turning inward, and fear of the “other,” America Calling is ultimately a call to action to keep America’s borders and minds open. Advance praise for the book: "It is books like this that make America a kinder and wiser nation. Highly recommended for high schools and colleges." --FIROOZEH DUMAS, New York Times bestselling author of Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America "America Calling is a unique addition to immigrant literature. Bhandari weaves a compelling narrative of the power of education to connect and transform—an experience that resonates deeply with me as a first-generation immigrant and college student." --REYNA GRANDE, best-selling author of A Dream Called Home and The Distance Between Us “Rajika Bhandari is a voice with moral clarity and rigorous intelligence…this is a clarion call for the nation’s policymakers and educators to welcome all curious minds.” --MAEVE HIGGINS, New York Times columnist, award-winning author of Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere "An Indian woman’s wonderfully written, illuminating account... a valuable study of an extremely important area of “soft diplomacy,” dispelling all sorts of easy and false assumptions. Bhandari’s informative memoir is for readers who want to understand how interconnected the world really is." —KIRKUS REVIEWS “In America Calling, Rajika Bhandari captures the confusion and wonder of the international student experience of the sort she, I, and many others have shared. Sometimes funny, often moving, and always thought-provoking, Dr Bhandari’s is a memorable story, and an enjoyable read.” —SHASHI THAROOR, Indian political leader, former Under-Secretary General of the UN, and best-selling author of 22 books including India: From Midnight to the Millennium and Beyond “In these times, when vociferous politicians promote isolation and nativism by vilifying immigrants, including the highly educated, Rajika Bhandari presents a bold counter-narrative, sharing her deeply personal and eye-opening insights into the trials and tribulations of international students in America--and the great value they bring to the entire country.” —HELEN ZIA, activist and author of Asian American Dreams and Last Boat out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese who Fled Mao's Revolution “America Calling is an engaging and timely read that will resonate strongly amongst the global academic community…As an immigrant with an educational background that spans two continents myself, I see an element of universality in Bhandari's narrative.” --ANDREW HAMILTON, President of New York University and former Vice-Chancellor, University of Oxford


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International students and immigrants have been the secret ingredient in America’s recipe for global success. America Calling shares one immigrant’s story, a tale that reflects millions more, and shows us why preventing the world’s best and brightest from seeking the American Dream will put this country’s future in jeopardy. Growing up in middle-class India, Rajika Bhandari International students and immigrants have been the secret ingredient in America’s recipe for global success. America Calling shares one immigrant’s story, a tale that reflects millions more, and shows us why preventing the world’s best and brightest from seeking the American Dream will put this country’s future in jeopardy. Growing up in middle-class India, Rajika Bhandari has seen generations of her family look westward, where an American education means status and success. But she resists the lure of America because those who left never return; they all become flies trapped in honey in a land of opportunity. As a young woman, however, she finds herself heading to a US university to study, following her heart and a relationship. When that relationship ends and she fails in her attempt to move back to India as a foreign-educated woman, she returns to the US and finds herself in a job where the personal is political and professional: she is immersed in the lives of international students who come to America from over 200 countries, the universities that attract them, and the tangled web of immigration that a student must navigate. An unflinching and insightful narrative that explores the global appeal of a Made-in-America education that is a bridge to America’s successful past and to its future, America Calling is both a deeply personal story of Bhandari’s search for her place and voice, and an incisive analysis of America’s relationship with the rest of the world through the most powerful tool of diplomacy: education. At a time of growing nationalism, a turning inward, and fear of the “other,” America Calling is ultimately a call to action to keep America’s borders and minds open. Advance praise for the book: "It is books like this that make America a kinder and wiser nation. Highly recommended for high schools and colleges." --FIROOZEH DUMAS, New York Times bestselling author of Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America "America Calling is a unique addition to immigrant literature. Bhandari weaves a compelling narrative of the power of education to connect and transform—an experience that resonates deeply with me as a first-generation immigrant and college student." --REYNA GRANDE, best-selling author of A Dream Called Home and The Distance Between Us “Rajika Bhandari is a voice with moral clarity and rigorous intelligence…this is a clarion call for the nation’s policymakers and educators to welcome all curious minds.” --MAEVE HIGGINS, New York Times columnist, award-winning author of Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere "An Indian woman’s wonderfully written, illuminating account... a valuable study of an extremely important area of “soft diplomacy,” dispelling all sorts of easy and false assumptions. Bhandari’s informative memoir is for readers who want to understand how interconnected the world really is." —KIRKUS REVIEWS “In America Calling, Rajika Bhandari captures the confusion and wonder of the international student experience of the sort she, I, and many others have shared. Sometimes funny, often moving, and always thought-provoking, Dr Bhandari’s is a memorable story, and an enjoyable read.” —SHASHI THAROOR, Indian political leader, former Under-Secretary General of the UN, and best-selling author of 22 books including India: From Midnight to the Millennium and Beyond “In these times, when vociferous politicians promote isolation and nativism by vilifying immigrants, including the highly educated, Rajika Bhandari presents a bold counter-narrative, sharing her deeply personal and eye-opening insights into the trials and tribulations of international students in America--and the great value they bring to the entire country.” —HELEN ZIA, activist and author of Asian American Dreams and Last Boat out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese who Fled Mao's Revolution “America Calling is an engaging and timely read that will resonate strongly amongst the global academic community…As an immigrant with an educational background that spans two continents myself, I see an element of universality in Bhandari's narrative.” --ANDREW HAMILTON, President of New York University and former Vice-Chancellor, University of Oxford

45 review for America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    As a former foreign student in France and instructor of foreign students at a university in Japan that increasingly depends on them to stay in business, I found this book interesting and relevant. (I also have an Indian American sister-in-law.) Bhandari's personal experiences were engaging, and her argument for admitting foreign students to the United States and allowing them to stay is convincing. These lessons also apply to Japan, where there is virtually no immigration, and where students educ As a former foreign student in France and instructor of foreign students at a university in Japan that increasingly depends on them to stay in business, I found this book interesting and relevant. (I also have an Indian American sister-in-law.) Bhandari's personal experiences were engaging, and her argument for admitting foreign students to the United States and allowing them to stay is convincing. These lessons also apply to Japan, where there is virtually no immigration, and where students educated in Japan are expected to leave after finishing their degrees. What if they were allowed to stay? Just imagine how much they would be able to contribute!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sallie

    I wish to thank NetGalley and She Writes Press for allowing me to read an advanced copy of this book. I have voluntarily read and reviewed it. All thoughts and opinions are my own. This book is about a young girl from India who leaves her home to travel to the United States to go to college. It details the hardships that she endured in receiving her education, her Visa and later her Green Card. She explains the general attitude towards people from outside the United States who are struggling to g I wish to thank NetGalley and She Writes Press for allowing me to read an advanced copy of this book. I have voluntarily read and reviewed it. All thoughts and opinions are my own. This book is about a young girl from India who leaves her home to travel to the United States to go to college. It details the hardships that she endured in receiving her education, her Visa and later her Green Card. She explains the general attitude towards people from outside the United States who are struggling to get an education here. The book goes into detail about the positive results of furnishing foreign students with the opportunity to study here. So many of their country’s brightest students come here and never leave thus contributing much to this country in the way of finances, cultural growth and jobs So many of the more desirable positions that our students are not able or willing to fill. It was certainly enlightening to me. After obtaining her Doctorate and working here for a brief time, she returned to India to seek employment there. She was not accepted and certainly not offered salaries comparable to her education. Being a woman was not respectable in the work setting at higher levels in India. So, she applied for a position in New York, was hired and returned to America. She is now the Director who oversees the lives of international students from over 200 countries. From her personal experiences she is able to help these students navigate the maze of bureaucracy of graduating from these schools and leading productive lives. I learned a lot and hope to be a better informed person because I read this book. Thank you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn LaTorre

    I received an advanced copy of America Calling. This captivating story follows the odyssey of a young woman from India who, following her heart and a relationship, arrives in the US to pursue her own advanced degrees. Through her discerning eyes, the reader sees our politics, food, dress, and cultural mores in new ways. Rajika navigates the US rituals, rules, and celebrations with limited economic resources. As she wrestles with the bureaucracy of visas, work permits, and employment, we learn in I received an advanced copy of America Calling. This captivating story follows the odyssey of a young woman from India who, following her heart and a relationship, arrives in the US to pursue her own advanced degrees. Through her discerning eyes, the reader sees our politics, food, dress, and cultural mores in new ways. Rajika navigates the US rituals, rules, and celebrations with limited economic resources. As she wrestles with the bureaucracy of visas, work permits, and employment, we learn in scholarly detail the history and confusing status of the US immigration system. The protagonist’s journey from newly arrived foreign student to a US citizen traces her gradual discovery of what she wants and deserves as a liberated woman.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara Cassidy

    I was so excited reading about the premise of this book being an international student myself and was intrigued to see the similarities and differences of our respective experiences. I was happy to realise as early on as the prologue that I was going to enjoy America Calling. Bhandari’s astounding intelligence was immediately clear to me and yet she still wrote in the most accessible way, which I’m particularly fond of because issues featured in this book needs to be understood by more people. T I was so excited reading about the premise of this book being an international student myself and was intrigued to see the similarities and differences of our respective experiences. I was happy to realise as early on as the prologue that I was going to enjoy America Calling. Bhandari’s astounding intelligence was immediately clear to me and yet she still wrote in the most accessible way, which I’m particularly fond of because issues featured in this book needs to be understood by more people. The combination of anecdotes and shocking statistics conveyed Bhandari’s evident passion about the topics. The book was split into three parts. The first covering the author’s experience moving from India to the US and all the joys, hardships and discoveries she made about not only America, but her home country too. The second painting her experience growing into the workplace and more issues on the tedious immigration laws of America. The third uncovering the truth about myths and stereotypes concerning Immigrants and international students. I loved that I was able to learn a lot about India’s general history and emigration history. I was stunned about Bhandari’s family’s experience in the partition and found that it was almost identical to that of someone very close to me. The way it is a common family history for people now residing in Northern India indicates a duty for everyone to learn more about what occurred. Also, I found it interesting to read about how moving away caused the Author to realise the racism and misogyny in India and the systemic racism, xenophobia and slightly quieter, but still very real sexism in America. I hadn’t heard of the African Airlift before and I’m excited to look into it even more. It was one of several examples proving how essential international students are for teaching Americans about places beyond their borders and providing great young minds for the workplace. I wish the second part of the book had been stretched out more because it spanned over a longer period of time, yet less is written about it and the stories and facts included in the second part was definitely my favourite part. In some areas it felt a little bit repetitive. I have definitely learnt a lot from this incredibly informative book and will certainly encourage people to read America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility when it is released. Thank you so much to Books Forward for providing me with this ARC. https://www.instagram.com/booksforwar... https://twitter.com/booksforwardpr https://www.tiktok.com/@booksforwardp... I would also like to thank Rajika Bhandari for writing a book that was such a pleasure to read. https://twitter.com/rajikabhandari https://www.instagram.com/rajika_bhan...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Reading Our Shelves

    Full review at: https://readingourshelves.com/2021/09... The author came to the US as a grad student in the early 90s, and studied at a state school in North Carolina. Initially, she came because that is where her boyfriend was studying. Later in life, though, she starts working for the Institute of International Education, which compiles data and research on exchange students in the US and elsewhere. So the first two-thirds of the book is her own story and experiences as a student first, then as Full review at: https://readingourshelves.com/2021/09... The author came to the US as a grad student in the early 90s, and studied at a state school in North Carolina. Initially, she came because that is where her boyfriend was studying. Later in life, though, she starts working for the Institute of International Education, which compiles data and research on exchange students in the US and elsewhere. So the first two-thirds of the book is her own story and experiences as a student first, then as an immigrant seeking a work visa. The last third of the book is other stories she’s compiled through her current job, as well as stats and figures from the world of international education. Some statistics that struck me: International students add $45 billion to the economy yearly. (Most pay their own way, or are awarded scholarships from their own countries to study abroad. Then, they still have to buy furniture and groceries here, like the rest of us.) Only one out of ten US students studies abroad. (Meaning that an international student on their campus here may be their only exposure to other cultures.) One out of four founders of start-ups valued at $1 billion first came to the US as an international student. Then there are the softer stats, like how so many students who study here and return to their home countries become advocates for US universities, or the US at large. They offer a large and vast network of unofficial diplomats in all areas of the globe. Bhandari mentions the Fulbright scholarship program as a shining example of this. The program offers both scholarships for international students to study in the US, and ones for US students to study elsewhere. Over its history, it has sponsored 400,000 students. 39 of those have gone on to become heads of state in their home countries, 60 have won Nobel prizes, and 88 have won Pulitzer prizes. Her own experiences are no less interesting, of course, although not as easy to break down into small bites. A few things she touches on, though, include reckoning with how Asians are considered the “model minority” here. Realizing that the freedoms she enjoyed as a woman in America made her unfit to return to her home country. Having to push hard to get through her masters and doctorate programs in 6 years, because being here on a visa meant she had strict time limits and couldn’t take any breaks. I had some exposure to international students when I was college-aged, and I appreciate knowing a little more about the issues surrounding studying internationally.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Randal White

    As readers of my past reviews may remember, one of my biggest joys in life is hosting foreign exchange students in our home. As they are teenagers, I realize that they sometimes have difficulty explaining how they are feeling about different aspects of American life. I learned so much from this book! The author, having come to America from India as an exchange student many years ago, has now had the time and ability to explain things to me. Through the use of great writing and explanations, Bhan As readers of my past reviews may remember, one of my biggest joys in life is hosting foreign exchange students in our home. As they are teenagers, I realize that they sometimes have difficulty explaining how they are feeling about different aspects of American life. I learned so much from this book! The author, having come to America from India as an exchange student many years ago, has now had the time and ability to explain things to me. Through the use of great writing and explanations, Bhandari has given me some wonderful insights into how they (she) was feeling! For example, her first experience with a chocolate chip cookie. Or being embarrassed about asking for ketchup with her pizza. Or with typing, or computers. Or the difference between Indian schools and American schools, and the interaction with the instructors. She explains all her feelings of embarrassment, inadequacy, and hesitancy. Her thoughts have given me a much better handle on how my students are doing/feeling. That alone was enough for me to fall in love with this book! But there is so much more. Bhandari goes on to describe her journey, throughout college and into the working world. And of the obstacles she faced, and overcame. Of the fears of plagiarism (culturally different here in America), and of the perceptions of skin color she brought with her. It is quite an engaging story! And she lays it out so well. The second half of the book deals with her life's work helping other International students. And things about them that I did not realize. I found it to be enlightening. I do not think I will ever look at an International student the same way again. This is a great book. I highly recommend it to anyone questioning why America has so many International students, and of their roles. Also to any educator who deals with students from other countries. And to any foreign exchange student, past or present, to help them understand their position, and how to maximize their experience later in life. I will be purchasing copies of this book and sending it to all my former students. Highly recommend!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Karen K.

    Indian-born author Rajika Bhandari arrived in America in the early 1990s as a PhD student in psychology. This book is a heartfelt and important memoir about her experiences as a foreign student navigating multiple identities. Although Bhandari self-identifies as light skinned compared with other people from India, she does not pass as White and experiences multiple instances of prejudice and micro-agreesssion. While fluent in English, Bhandari’s accent sets her apart from native speakers when sh Indian-born author Rajika Bhandari arrived in America in the early 1990s as a PhD student in psychology. This book is a heartfelt and important memoir about her experiences as a foreign student navigating multiple identities. Although Bhandari self-identifies as light skinned compared with other people from India, she does not pass as White and experiences multiple instances of prejudice and micro-agreesssion. While fluent in English, Bhandari’s accent sets her apart from native speakers when she takes the podium to lecture at North Carolina State University. She also reluctantly discovers and acknowledges her own inborn prejudices about Black Americans. The author’s immersion into student life is a constant reckoning with biases born of her childhood culture juxtaposed with all that she discovers in America: food, housing, modern appliances, personal and intellectual freedom, learning to drive, empowerment as a career woman. Vivid storytelling and well-crafted (often cinematic) scenes describe the author’s unique journey to America, and her quest for belonging. The latter part of *America Calling* delves into an academic analysis about (social and economic) values of international education, statistics about diverse visa categories, and uncertain futures of thousands of talented foreign students in cutting-edge research fields. Many international students have been sidelined by America’s visa policies in the aftermath of 9/11, during the Trump administration, and finally, by covid-19 travel restrictions. The author asks what is to become of humanity if great minds are not allowed to meet, mingle and learn in international venues such as colleges and universities. For me, the strongest part of this book is Bhandari's particular journey as a young woman who faces her personal fears of “the other” and builds a career focused on international education. This book builds a strong case for the value of overseas study and exchange programs for all students everywhere. This review is based on an ARC from the publisher and NetGalley.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Labannya

    America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility by @rajika_bhandari The book is divided into three parts. First, where the author leaves India to pursue her higher studies in America. How she managed her days there along with the tussel daily routine and struggling bureaucracy of visas, work permits, employment, green card issued. Second, As leaving there there for six years thought of returning back to India and have a career there but unfortunately she wouldn't getting a deserving America Calling: A Foreign Student in a Country of Possibility by @rajika_bhandari The book is divided into three parts. First, where the author leaves India to pursue her higher studies in America. How she managed her days there along with the tussel daily routine and struggling bureaucracy of visas, work permits, employment, green card issued. Second, As leaving there there for six years thought of returning back to India and have a career there but unfortunately she wouldn't getting a deserving job as she preferred amd she learnt that while staying outside India made her views on India and America changed. Third, Rajika tired trying and then she applied to New York where she got approval and been many years in US now she's a mother who still want her daughter to study and research over different countries and cultures. In this book, you'll get to know the scholarly details, the history and confusing status of the US immigration system and how messier it got in recent days. I've never been to US or I don't think I'll ever atleast for my studies (crossed the age already) but only for vacation. So, this book is huge for gathering knowledge I liked it so much. I'll define the book as a autobiographical and a memoir. This book can be even used in school for teaching cause the book covers almost everything important from 9/11 to pandemic and how it messes up more with the immigration system. Highly recommended as it's worth reading. This book reminds me of @TasleemaNasrin @arundhatiroy.bbb to some extent. As I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. And also, it contains lot of politics and comparison between India and America. Read and reviewed voluntarily, opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own. Thank you @NetGalley and @shewritespress for the #arc in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was around 3.5 stars for me. This is an interesting book. Bhandari shares her experience as an Indian woman with the US immigration system and being an international student. She shares how going to the US for graduate school changed her life and her perspective. She talks about life in the US post 9/11, navigating immigration and school, and feeling like a stranger in India and the US. Bhandari talks abou I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was around 3.5 stars for me. This is an interesting book. Bhandari shares her experience as an Indian woman with the US immigration system and being an international student. She shares how going to the US for graduate school changed her life and her perspective. She talks about life in the US post 9/11, navigating immigration and school, and feeling like a stranger in India and the US. Bhandari talks about the Holocaust and the partition of India that created Pakistan and what she knows about history. On the one hand the story is interesting and Bhandari shares her own experiences that are both relatable and difficult. But there's also a lot that I felt like she glossed over - like when she compared the experience of a Black student in her program to her own experience. I don't want to belittle the authors experiences that were at times terrible, it just felt like at times she kept trying to say that South Asians are oppressed too and while it's true, it's arguably not to the extent of other oppressed groups in the US. I was surprised that she didn't talk more about the violence against South Asians in the US following 9/11 that lasted for years but focused on other, very specific instances of frustration or fear. Ultimately to me the ending wasn't super satisfying. Bhandari gives some high-level reflection throughout the book but I was hoping for something more in depth and some closure that I don't feel like I got.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eduarda Cunha

    America Calling is both personal and objective, a perfect blend of facts and what only the heart who has lived through them can convey. It is a beautiful but hard insight into the lives of international students, immigrants, and soon to be citizens in a country where they weren't born or even raised. It shows the ugly truth of the hardships these people go through: how hard it is to leave everything you know behind, how unwelcoming your destination can be, how disappointing it can be to go back t America Calling is both personal and objective, a perfect blend of facts and what only the heart who has lived through them can convey. It is a beautiful but hard insight into the lives of international students, immigrants, and soon to be citizens in a country where they weren't born or even raised. It shows the ugly truth of the hardships these people go through: how hard it is to leave everything you know behind, how unwelcoming your destination can be, how disappointing it can be to go back to a place which used to be home but no longer feels that way, how confusing it can be to always feel stuck in between, no longer truly fitting in just one place or version of who you once were. Rajika talks about how your country shapes your beliefs and your own role in the world through education, and for that reason just how eye-opening it can be once you are exposed to people from all around the world. She demystifies the outdated notions that immigrants are out to get your job or even a danger to national security. America Calling humanises immigrants. Overall, a powerful first person testimony supported by hard undeniable evidence.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is a lovely and wonderful book. Rajika's story gives a nice insight into what foreign students encounter when they migrate to America. People like Rajika and many others who come looking to enhance or better their life are sadly overshadowed by the bad actors. I am adopted from South Korea. I was just a baby so I have had the experience that Rajika did but I did experience some racism due to my ethnicity. It was luckily, not as bad as people are dealing with it in today's world but still ho This is a lovely and wonderful book. Rajika's story gives a nice insight into what foreign students encounter when they migrate to America. People like Rajika and many others who come looking to enhance or better their life are sadly overshadowed by the bad actors. I am adopted from South Korea. I was just a baby so I have had the experience that Rajika did but I did experience some racism due to my ethnicity. It was luckily, not as bad as people are dealing with it in today's world but still horrible. Yet, if I was older I could imagine myself experiencing what Rajika did with people interactions, food, and currency. All things that people who live in America don't really think about or take for granted. As Rajika says that foreigners contribute to the US economy in a lot more ways than just financially. She is right. There are many that get an education in law, medicine, science, and technology to name a few. All important to our society. Thus, America needs to make it easier for foreigners to be able to stay in the US.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susanne

    Thank you to the author, She Writes Press and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This thoughtful and fascinating book is part memoir and part scholarly exploration of the how and why of international students. The author tells her personal story of how she more or less accidentally became an international student by following her fiancé from India to the USA. In doing so, she unpacks the expectations placed upon young women at the time in both cultures, and the cultural differ Thank you to the author, She Writes Press and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This thoughtful and fascinating book is part memoir and part scholarly exploration of the how and why of international students. The author tells her personal story of how she more or less accidentally became an international student by following her fiancé from India to the USA. In doing so, she unpacks the expectations placed upon young women at the time in both cultures, and the cultural differences nothing could have prepared her for. She also experiences a common phenomena, going back to a home that is no longer familiar or welcoming, and which leads to her decision to make her permanent home in the USA. In the last part of the book, she looks at the impact that international students have upon a society, while also giving insight into the political relationship between the USA and the rest of the world, based on educational diplomacy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Han Vu-Tran

    I received an advanced readers copy of this book from netgalley through my affiliation with Books Forward. This book was incredibly thoughtful and honest. It shines a light on America's dependence on international students. But for the students give into America, they get not much in return. Going through American immigration is such a big struggle and the process of just getting a work visa or green card is really harder than it needs to be due to the perception that immigrants are stealing job I received an advanced readers copy of this book from netgalley through my affiliation with Books Forward. This book was incredibly thoughtful and honest. It shines a light on America's dependence on international students. But for the students give into America, they get not much in return. Going through American immigration is such a big struggle and the process of just getting a work visa or green card is really harder than it needs to be due to the perception that immigrants are stealing jobs from American born Americans(aka white people). Bhandari talks about the changes in who she is now versus who she was when she came to America and she's grown a lot. I really enjoyed reading her take on everything and it was clear how well researched this book was. Regardless, it was still very personal and it allows readers to connect with Bhandari's struggles and experiences.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janilyn Kocher

    Bhandari documents her experiences as an international student in the 1990s in the US. She also extrapolates on the importance of foreign students to the US economy and educational system. It was interesting to read about her diving into the unknown as a grad student and navigating the choppy waters of cultural differences. She makes some assertions about American society and politics that I didn’t agree with, but it wasn’t that big of a distraction. America continues to beckon to thousands of s Bhandari documents her experiences as an international student in the 1990s in the US. She also extrapolates on the importance of foreign students to the US economy and educational system. It was interesting to read about her diving into the unknown as a grad student and navigating the choppy waters of cultural differences. She makes some assertions about American society and politics that I didn’t agree with, but it wasn’t that big of a distraction. America continues to beckon to thousands of students, in search of their concept of America. Thanks to She Writes Press and NetGalley for the advance read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marshall

    “International students are an asset and not a liability, but most Americans don’t realize this.” So says Rajika Bhandari in her new memoir/homage to international education. For anyone working in international education this book is a must-read professionally. I also recommend giving this book to anyone in your family that does not understand your work or why you find it important. This Christmas I can already see myself giving out multiple copies to family and friends that wrongly believe the “International students are an asset and not a liability, but most Americans don’t realize this.” So says Rajika Bhandari in her new memoir/homage to international education. For anyone working in international education this book is a must-read professionally. I also recommend giving this book to anyone in your family that does not understand your work or why you find it important. This Christmas I can already see myself giving out multiple copies to family and friends that wrongly believe the myth that international students take spots in the classroom from hard-working Americans. Insightful memoir in Part 1 my only critique is that the focus shifts to a love letter to international education and I wanted to know more about her personal life. I won’t spoil the memoir part. There is so much value to this book for anyone involved in education. So many values I possess myself. So much insight into the feelings - hopes, dreams, anxieties, of international students studying in the US. Thank you for this important work Rajika!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha McDuffee

    In America Calling Bhandari weaves memoir together with her own research for the Institute of International Education. I have spent years studying displacement and immigration, but as I read America Calling I found myself seriously unaware of the opportunities international students seek in the U.S. or the challenges they face in order to pursue them. Of all the categories of immigrant to the U.S., international students were (and still are) the one I knew least about. For those who are intereste In America Calling Bhandari weaves memoir together with her own research for the Institute of International Education. I have spent years studying displacement and immigration, but as I read America Calling I found myself seriously unaware of the opportunities international students seek in the U.S. or the challenges they face in order to pursue them. Of all the categories of immigrant to the U.S., international students were (and still are) the one I knew least about. For those who are interested in practicing hospitality, but who find themselves living in small towns that are not hosting other kinds of immigrants, welcoming international students from your local university (and even community college) campuses would be a perfect place to start. Through the story of one international student, America Calling will introduce you to the needs of thousands of others for welcome and community and the gift that they are to us.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wadhera

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dori

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  21. 4 out of 5

    Atish

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nitivia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Lee Arnold

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Harris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Michelberg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leora Krygier

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pam Valois

  31. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  32. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Kay

  33. 4 out of 5

    Meg Nocero

  34. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Taylor

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kabir

  36. 5 out of 5

    Signe Myers

  37. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  38. 5 out of 5

    Miss Susan

  39. 4 out of 5

    Chivasblue .

  40. 4 out of 5

    Leena

  41. 4 out of 5

    Sidnie Layesa

  42. 4 out of 5

    Emily LaPlaca

  43. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  44. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

  45. 5 out of 5

    Dallas Shattuck

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