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The Truth About White Lies

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For fans of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight, this gripping YA novel digs into the historical and present-day effects of white supremacy and the depths of privilege. Shania never thinks much about being white. But after her beloved grandmother passes, she moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and is thrust into Bard, the city's wealthiest private school. At Bard, race i For fans of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight, this gripping YA novel digs into the historical and present-day effects of white supremacy and the depths of privilege. Shania never thinks much about being white. But after her beloved grandmother passes, she moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and is thrust into Bard, the city's wealthiest private school. At Bard, race is both invisible and hypervisible, and Shania's new friends are split on what they see. There's Catherine, the school's queen bee, who unexpectedly takes Shania under her wing. Then there's Prescott, the golden boy who seems perfect…except for the disturbing rumors about an altercation he had with a Black student who left the school. But Prescott isn't the only one with secrets. As Shania grieves for the grandmother she idolized, she realizes her family roots stretch far back into Blue Rock's history. When the truth comes to light, Shania will have to make a choice and face the violence of her silence.


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For fans of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight, this gripping YA novel digs into the historical and present-day effects of white supremacy and the depths of privilege. Shania never thinks much about being white. But after her beloved grandmother passes, she moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and is thrust into Bard, the city's wealthiest private school. At Bard, race i For fans of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight, this gripping YA novel digs into the historical and present-day effects of white supremacy and the depths of privilege. Shania never thinks much about being white. But after her beloved grandmother passes, she moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and is thrust into Bard, the city's wealthiest private school. At Bard, race is both invisible and hypervisible, and Shania's new friends are split on what they see. There's Catherine, the school's queen bee, who unexpectedly takes Shania under her wing. Then there's Prescott, the golden boy who seems perfect…except for the disturbing rumors about an altercation he had with a Black student who left the school. But Prescott isn't the only one with secrets. As Shania grieves for the grandmother she idolized, she realizes her family roots stretch far back into Blue Rock's history. When the truth comes to light, Shania will have to make a choice and face the violence of her silence.

30 review for The Truth About White Lies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    The Truth About White Lies follows Shania as she moves to Blue Rock after the death of her grandmother. In Blue Rock, Shania starts attending Bard, the most prestigious private school there. Shania is quickly befriended by Catherine, the most popular girl at Bard, and she also has no trouble catching the attention of the mysterious Prescott. I think this book had the right idea (attempting to bring to light a white girl's blindness to her privilege), but it wasn't well executed. How are we as rea The Truth About White Lies follows Shania as she moves to Blue Rock after the death of her grandmother. In Blue Rock, Shania starts attending Bard, the most prestigious private school there. Shania is quickly befriended by Catherine, the most popular girl at Bard, and she also has no trouble catching the attention of the mysterious Prescott. I think this book had the right idea (attempting to bring to light a white girl's blindness to her privilege), but it wasn't well executed. How are we as readers supposed to follow a character's journey if that character is a caricature of a teen girl? I couldn't root for nor relate to Shania at all. She was so ridiculously naive. Like I find it hard to believe she's unfamiliar with Mexican food (a food 86% of Americans enjoy or the 3rd most popular food in the US). It also bothered me how time and again she felt uncomfortable by blatant racism right in front of her face, but she didn't learn or grow from those experiences. I mean I didn't expect her to become woke immediately, but a little growth would have been nice. Don't even get me started on how deplorable Catherine (who really talks like that?) and Prescott were. Awful characters. And what was that ending? Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC, but this book was not something I could ever see myself recommending.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nainika Gupta

    (2.5 stars) Hmm. Okay, so I'm super conflicted here. The way this book ended didn't leave me very settled and I couldn't help feeling that I needed to know more. Like a lot more. But I did particularly like the fact that our character is a spoiled selfish brat who ends up STILL a spoiled selfish brat. Like, yeah, people don't change. (most of them) (2.5 stars) Hmm. Okay, so I'm super conflicted here. The way this book ended didn't leave me very settled and I couldn't help feeling that I needed to know more. Like a lot more. But I did particularly like the fact that our character is a spoiled selfish brat who ends up STILL a spoiled selfish brat. Like, yeah, people don't change. (most of them)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elyse (ElyseReadsandSpeaks)

    I'm struggling with rating this one. On one hand, I think the message is really powerful and deserving of notice, so I want to give it 4 stars. On the other hand, I just didn't like the writing to the point that I nearly DNF'd it so I feel that's more in the 1-2 star range. So let's start with what I really liked - this story is about complacent racism. Maybe Shania didn't personally use slurs or make racist jokes, but she was silent. Even when something inside her nagged at her that something w I'm struggling with rating this one. On one hand, I think the message is really powerful and deserving of notice, so I want to give it 4 stars. On the other hand, I just didn't like the writing to the point that I nearly DNF'd it so I feel that's more in the 1-2 star range. So let's start with what I really liked - this story is about complacent racism. Maybe Shania didn't personally use slurs or make racist jokes, but she was silent. Even when something inside her nagged at her that something wasn't quite right, she stayed silent. That silence then turned into something darker as she was presented with information and chose to do and say nothing. It became a question of "How far are you willing to go?" and I really liked that the term "pre-radicalization" was used to show where Shania was in life. I think without a shove from a cop in the right direction, Shania would have continued to stay silent. It wasn't so much that she chose the right path, but that she was forced onto it. Does that make someone anti-racist? No. There were some really good things in here that I think I'll mull over for a while. Maybe I'll eventually bump it up to 4 stars. Who knows. But let's chat about why I just couldn't get into this for the first third of the book. A bunch of names are dumped at once and I had a really difficult time deciphering who was who for a while. Because I couldn't tell who everyone was, I also had no clue what their races were for a while which is a main theme of the book. It is not a good thing that a main theme of the book was lost to me for a good amount of time because I couldn't remember who was who. The writing made it really confusing for about 30-35% of the book that I almost put it down. Which sucks because like I said earlier, this book had some really good things in here that I think people should read. I think 3 stars is a fair assessment when I take everything into account.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McPhedran

    WOW. This book is a seriously important and necessary part of our current social situation. This book grapples with what it means to have power and privilege in our society right now. Shania is struggling with the recent loss of her beloved grandmother, and has just moved to the city. When she starts at a new school, she is faced with her grandmothers past-and not everything is as it seems. Shania is also swept up in the social hierarchy within the school, and becomes enamored with the Tane fami WOW. This book is a seriously important and necessary part of our current social situation. This book grapples with what it means to have power and privilege in our society right now. Shania is struggling with the recent loss of her beloved grandmother, and has just moved to the city. When she starts at a new school, she is faced with her grandmothers past-and not everything is as it seems. Shania is also swept up in the social hierarchy within the school, and becomes enamored with the Tane family. But the Tanes aren't what they seem. And Shania needs to figure out if she's going to do better than her ancestors. I loved this book, and felt very vulnerable at times reading it. It really forces the reader to look at some hard realities that we make take for granted as a white person. A fantastic read. Can't recommend it enough.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    "About a 17-year-old white girl who moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and reckons with her role in racism in her new town, as well as the historical and present day effects of white supremacy, and the danger in silence." (x) "About a 17-year-old white girl who moves to the gentrifying town of Blue Rock and reckons with her role in racism in her new town, as well as the historical and present day effects of white supremacy, and the danger in silence." (x)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Living My Best Book Life

    The Truth about White Lies is a young adult novel that is both bold and eye-opening. Author Olivia Cole's writing is striking with her perspective on white supremacy and privilege. In this day and age, racism is sadly still present. And this book looks at it from the perspective of a teenage white young woman and her own experiences dealing with both racism and white privilege. The story follows Shania who is dealing with the loss of her grandmother. It leads to her move to Blue Rock where she so The Truth about White Lies is a young adult novel that is both bold and eye-opening. Author Olivia Cole's writing is striking with her perspective on white supremacy and privilege. In this day and age, racism is sadly still present. And this book looks at it from the perspective of a teenage white young woman and her own experiences dealing with both racism and white privilege. The story follows Shania who is dealing with the loss of her grandmother. It leads to her move to Blue Rock where she soon attends a prestigious private school. She is surrounded by many others that look like her. She befriends some popular people and yet she can always sense something is off/not right. As she spends more time with her new friends and an almost-boyfriend, things start to happen. Those things include hate towards black people and killings of cats. Who is doing these horrible things? You can tell that Shania has a good heart but also that she can be easily manipulated. People call her out on this and even mention that her so-called friends aren't who she believes them to be. So, when rumors start going around and the crimes don't stop she is forced to pick sides. Will she choose to dig into the truth even if it means bringing up personal secrets? I give The Truth about White Lies 4 stars. I like that this book tackled the subject of white privilege and supremacy from a perspective of a young white woman. This is unlike anything I have read before and is an important read to really see right from wrong in different perspectives.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Lentz

    Wow. I am so impressed by this book. I thought the story was going in one particular direction, but the point it ends up making was much more ambitious and necessary in YA today. I appreciate the lens this book takes and honestly I think it's really brave... this is not the same old story you've read before about a white person confronting their history and unconscious biases and coming out of that journey changed and better, and it doesn't talk down to kids about white supremacy or violence or Wow. I am so impressed by this book. I thought the story was going in one particular direction, but the point it ends up making was much more ambitious and necessary in YA today. I appreciate the lens this book takes and honestly I think it's really brave... this is not the same old story you've read before about a white person confronting their history and unconscious biases and coming out of that journey changed and better, and it doesn't talk down to kids about white supremacy or violence or white privilege. It's an inherently frustrating read for a reason, and while it took me a little bit to be able to distinguish characters, the pacing and narrative work here are so impressive. The prose itself is also really sensory and memorable. I can't wait for this book to come out and be able to recommend it widely to teens at my library. I think it would make a great choice for book clubs or discussion groups. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the author. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) more like a 4.5 TW: racism, fatphobia, islamaphobia, homophobia The Truth About White Lies is a book that was not written for me. It's written for white teens who are at the beginning of their journey. At the stage where they feel that pit of the stomach feeling that a comment is wrong, that a joke isn't funny, but aren't yet at the point of speaking up. Of knowing and putting into word (Disclaimer: I received this book from the author. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) more like a 4.5 TW: racism, fatphobia, islamaphobia, homophobia The Truth About White Lies is a book that was not written for me. It's written for white teens who are at the beginning of their journey. At the stage where they feel that pit of the stomach feeling that a comment is wrong, that a joke isn't funny, but aren't yet at the point of speaking up. Of knowing and putting into words why it isn't funny. To seeing the ways they benefit from their skin color in a world that judges based on appearance. Because to not be aware of your skin color is very much an experience only for certain people. So while Shania can be a frustrating character, part of that is precisely the point. Because that feeling already can examine the bystander effects, the ways she doesn't understand why 'it always has to be about white people'. She's at the beginning moments. And where The Truth About White Lies excels is by illustrating a story where Shania has to truly reckon with her privilege, to allow what others are saying in, and to have her moment of understanding. Not only that, but Cole does a fantastic job of never excusing the comments, of providing these clues and breadcrumbs we fail to see, and also dismantling the comments of white supremacy. To not portray a sense of white savior mentality or of glorifying this journey. Shania is very much a flawed human - like us all - in her quest for love and being 'seen', for craving closure about her grandma, and wanting so desperately to have friends. But the point about The Truth About White Lies is that we have to be responsible for our choices and we can chose differently. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I think this book says some really important things, but it almost doesn’t go far enough? And the ending felt too unresolved. We’d also met SO many characters and there was little to no resolution with many of them. I know not every book needs a tidy ending tied up with a neat little bow, but the conclusion of this one felt completely unwrapped with not enough questions answered.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Dyer

    Round up to 4.5 stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Britta Lundin

    Actually the ending is exactly right.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    This book is not my favorite. I wanted to like it. The plot sounded really interesting. However, I just did not care for it. I don’t know if it was the writing style or what, but I didn’t feel any connection to the characters whatsoever. Overall, this book was just really difficult to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Gordon

    This book had the right idea, the concept is an important one. However, Shania is an oblivious idiot and spent the entire book saying things like "what?", "what do you mean?" and "I dont understand" to the most basic things. I have teenagers and theyre not dumb. Shania was unlikable and unrelatable. This book had the right idea, the concept is an important one. However, Shania is an oblivious idiot and spent the entire book saying things like "what?", "what do you mean?" and "I dont understand" to the most basic things. I have teenagers and theyre not dumb. Shania was unlikable and unrelatable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Marshall

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an important book about an important topic, and for the most part, it pulls it off. The writing was good, and there were a lot of symbols in it, which I liked. The author does a good job of showing how invisible white supremacy is to those it benefits, yet how visible it is to those who are hurt by it. Unfortunately, there are many Prescott Tanes, and maybe even more Catherine Tanes in the world, and many communities are hurt by them every day. This book deals with a heavy topic, but it This was an important book about an important topic, and for the most part, it pulls it off. The writing was good, and there were a lot of symbols in it, which I liked. The author does a good job of showing how invisible white supremacy is to those it benefits, yet how visible it is to those who are hurt by it. Unfortunately, there are many Prescott Tanes, and maybe even more Catherine Tanes in the world, and many communities are hurt by them every day. This book deals with a heavy topic, but it does it with grace, and it does a good job of showing the consequences of racism. However, I did have issues with this book. The first issue that I have is that the reader never actually learns what happened between Prescott and Eric, or what happened between Willa and Catherine. It's sort of implied, but there's never a good description of the events that occurred. The author's characterization of the Tane family also leaves a lot up to the reader's imagination. The reader knows that Prescott and Catherine are horrible people, but we never get to meet their parents, who sound like they're equally as horrible. The reveal that Prescott was the one who was terrorizing SoBR/Southtown also wasn't done as well as it could have been. In other words, the author does more telling than showing. My second issue is that Shania, the lead character, is an idiot. While her ignorance was believable at first, that believability faded as the story escalated. By the end of the book, I found myself wanting to grab her by the shirt collar and shake some sense into her. Prescott literally treated people like dirt and went on several questionable rants, and Shania still continued to pseudo-date him. Even if she missed the racist meaning behind his rant in the art museum, it should still have rubbed her the wrong way. If someone had said stuff like that to me, I would have gotten the heck out of there without hesitating. Even after she finds evidence that Prescott is a literal white supremacist in his room, she still won't stop seeing him or talking to him. Even after she hears from Michelle that Prescott put Eric in the hospital and is violent, she still finds a way to defend him. He literally tried to murder Earl at the end of the book, and Shania goes out of her way to hide the evidence. Even in Shania's friendship with Catherine, she let so many things slide that would have turned off any sane person. For the majority of the book, Catherine was either drunk or was pissing people off with her problematic comments (or both), and being a horrible friend in general. And Shania still wanted to be friends with her. Even after Catherine admitted that four of her friends quit hanging out with her because she's such a terrible person, Shania won't leave her side. Shania, if your 'friend' goes through friends like most people go through soda cans, then she's probably not a good person. Shania was also a terrible friend to Michelle and Willa, and even went as far as to lie about Michelle to the school counselor towards the end of the book because she's mad that Michelle called her out because of her absurd amount of loyalty towards her horrible boyfriend and 'best friend.' In conclusion, this is an important book and not to be missed, but the lead protagonist is an idiot.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    2.5 stars, rounded up to 3 Thanks to Little, Brown for an advanced copy of this to review! After her grandmother passes away, Shania and her mother move to Blue Rock for a fresh start. However, Shania's troubled by something her grandmother said before she died, apologizing for the lies. Shania doesn't understand what her grandmother meant until she learns more about her histroy in Blue Rock. A history Shania didn't know existed. Let me start by saying I appreciated what this book was trying to do. 2.5 stars, rounded up to 3 Thanks to Little, Brown for an advanced copy of this to review! After her grandmother passes away, Shania and her mother move to Blue Rock for a fresh start. However, Shania's troubled by something her grandmother said before she died, apologizing for the lies. Shania doesn't understand what her grandmother meant until she learns more about her histroy in Blue Rock. A history Shania didn't know existed. Let me start by saying I appreciated what this book was trying to do. Shania is white, and for most of her life, she never really thought about her race or the way race impacts her privilege. Before moving to Blue Rock, characterized as a big city, she didn't really believe she had to think about it. A lot of this book is Shania working through her own thoughts about the fact that her family's histroy is colored by racism, and that she's confronted with it every day at school. There are some important conversations that happen in this book because of that, and I think they are good conversations for what is probably a white target audience. There aren't necessarily a lot of YA books that deal with racism in this particular way, and I appreciate what the author tried to do. However, I don't think the writing was particularly strong and overall, I don't think Shania changes enough throughout the book. The ending feels kind of abrupt, with not much resolution after a very, very slow moving story. There are hints throughout that her boyfriend, Prescott, is a bad (racist) dude, but his portrayal felt a bit disjointed? Or at least, we get more telling about what he's actually like rather than showing. We get most of our information about Prescott second hand from other characters, and while this gives the feeling that he's an incredibly violent white supremacist, it's still not really shown in the interactions we do see with him. The interactions between characters also don't necessarily feel realistic. The plot, the characters, and the setting don't feel like they meld together very well, making the writing itself feel choppy and not very well put together. There are a lot of inconsistencies in the plot and small details, which I know it's partly because this is an ARC, but still. Shania's character didn't feel very consistent throughout, and I wanted the information about her family history to have more of an impact on her. Like, it has an impact on her, but it generally doesn't seem to change how she views the world. Finally, this is one of those YA books where it feels like an adult writing teenage characters. There was just something about the way they were characterized and written that felt off to me. A lot of the time, they didn't really feel like teenagers in the way they talked, interacted, and just their general actions throughout. I just got a general weird vibe from the characters and didn't really care about any of them, to be honest. All in all, even though this book is definitely tackling an important message, the overall writing left something to be desired for me. It felt very much like a debut YA, and a debut YA that needs a lot more editing before the final draft.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kukiyo

    We should begin this review with the statement tackles topics such as racism, Islamaphobia, Homophobia and fatphobia. If you look closer you will find other phobias mixed it. In fact, the topics are so prominent and in your face, that there is a disclaimer in the book before you turn to the first page. The Truth About White Lies follows Shania – a young white high schooler – who has moved to a new school and has to find her way around the town politics and friendships. It becomes an easy read bec We should begin this review with the statement tackles topics such as racism, Islamaphobia, Homophobia and fatphobia. If you look closer you will find other phobias mixed it. In fact, the topics are so prominent and in your face, that there is a disclaimer in the book before you turn to the first page. The Truth About White Lies follows Shania – a young white high schooler – who has moved to a new school and has to find her way around the town politics and friendships. It becomes an easy read because all readers can remember being put in new situations where they aren’t sure where they fit it. As we get deeper into the book, the issues of white supremacy and how Shania deals with the decision to confront or not to confront becomes an interesting and often times frustating one. It’s an interesting read, but one that at the end of it could have done a better job at getting its point across if there was more show and less tell. The writing wasn’t as strong as we would have liked and at times felt forced and put together rather than organic. Good read, not one we would leave on our bookshelf.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meher

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Although well-written and I enjoyed the descriptions of feelings, I was extremely confused about the perspective it was written from. It was written from somewhere between a third-person omniscient and third-person limited perspective, since Shania's feelings were evident, but her random racist/ignorant outbursts seemed so out-of-place. I didn't understand why she was characterized as "silent" and "always looking", sometimes self-identifying as such, but then she would have an extremely strong o Although well-written and I enjoyed the descriptions of feelings, I was extremely confused about the perspective it was written from. It was written from somewhere between a third-person omniscient and third-person limited perspective, since Shania's feelings were evident, but her random racist/ignorant outbursts seemed so out-of-place. I didn't understand why she was characterized as "silent" and "always looking", sometimes self-identifying as such, but then she would have an extremely strong opinion about something which would take the reader by surprise. For that reason, I spent the book super confused whenever she would side with Catherine or Prescott, because her own beliefs weren't clear in any way. While this may have been purposeful in order to have the reader understand how she wanted to fit in at Bard, I think it was poorly executed because it was not evident that she was trying to fit in.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris G.

    Leaving rural Morrisville with her mom after the death of her beloved grandma, Shania is enrolled at Bard Academy in Black Rock, which her mom proclaims will be a fresh start for them all. Shania works at a doughnut shop and, eager to fit in with her private school classmates, she becomes friends with wealthy and capricious Catherine Tane while starting a romantic relationship with Catherine’s older brother Prescott. Botany class, which is Shania’s solace, is where she gets to know Michelle, who Leaving rural Morrisville with her mom after the death of her beloved grandma, Shania is enrolled at Bard Academy in Black Rock, which her mom proclaims will be a fresh start for them all. Shania works at a doughnut shop and, eager to fit in with her private school classmates, she becomes friends with wealthy and capricious Catherine Tane while starting a romantic relationship with Catherine’s older brother Prescott. Botany class, which is Shania’s solace, is where she gets to know Michelle, who is Black, and begins to see the racial tensions at Bard. As Shania learns some truths that threaten everything she has ever believed about her family, she still tries to ignore worrying signs of Prescott’s White Nationalism. What does it look like to understand white privilege? A good choice for high school book clubs. EARC from Edelweiss.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I won this book during a Goodreads Giveaway and I give it 4.5 stars. For the most part I loved this book. Michelle, Willa, and Ben of course. Catherine, I liked then hated at times. And Prescott just oozed racist to me the minute he stepped into the story. Shania was ok. I get her headspace for sure when it comes to the black/white thing. I never saw color or any of that until a few years ago. I wish I had seen it sooner but I didn’t. I was hoping that at the end of the story she would give the I won this book during a Goodreads Giveaway and I give it 4.5 stars. For the most part I loved this book. Michelle, Willa, and Ben of course. Catherine, I liked then hated at times. And Prescott just oozed racist to me the minute he stepped into the story. Shania was ok. I get her headspace for sure when it comes to the black/white thing. I never saw color or any of that until a few years ago. I wish I had seen it sooner but I didn’t. I was hoping that at the end of the story she would give the weapon to the detective, they would go after Prescott, and that her and her mom would finally have it out and talk to each other. That didn't happen though and for me it felt a little open ended. I'm hoping the author will write another book to follow this one and I will for sure be keeping my eyes open. This story in a whole was really good and I think everyone should read it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sally Miller

    YA- contains lots of language, racial discrimination. Teenage girl discovers her family's past - her great-grandfather's racism and her grandmother's attempt to right the wrongs. Now faced with a new school and new friends, Shania has to choose her own path. She finds that these friends are hiding their own secrets. Does she learn from the mistakes made by her family or does she follow her white supremacist friends? Shania is caught in the crossfire and is faced with very real and heartbreaking d YA- contains lots of language, racial discrimination. Teenage girl discovers her family's past - her great-grandfather's racism and her grandmother's attempt to right the wrongs. Now faced with a new school and new friends, Shania has to choose her own path. She finds that these friends are hiding their own secrets. Does she learn from the mistakes made by her family or does she follow her white supremacist friends? Shania is caught in the crossfire and is faced with very real and heartbreaking decisions.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. S. Miller

    YA- contains lots of language, racial discrimination. Teenage girl discovers her family's past - her great-grandfather's racism and her grandmother's attempt to right the wrongs. Now faced with a new school and new friends, Shania has to choose her own path. She finds that these friends are hiding their own secrets. Does she learn from the mistakes made by her family or does she follow her white supremacist friends? Shania is caught in the crossfire and is faced with very real and heartbreaking d YA- contains lots of language, racial discrimination. Teenage girl discovers her family's past - her great-grandfather's racism and her grandmother's attempt to right the wrongs. Now faced with a new school and new friends, Shania has to choose her own path. She finds that these friends are hiding their own secrets. Does she learn from the mistakes made by her family or does she follow her white supremacist friends? Shania is caught in the crossfire and is faced with very real and heartbreaking decisions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn Casker

    “White lies end up invisible unless you really really look. And when you really really look, you see this huge web of white lies and the truth is you can’t build anything that lasts off of them” OOF such an important read. This book dives head first into a fictional tale on how small acceptance of micro aggressions can explode into general acceptance of blatant racism. How far will white ignorance and privilege go just because you’re friends with/infatuated with the people making those comments? “White lies end up invisible unless you really really look. And when you really really look, you see this huge web of white lies and the truth is you can’t build anything that lasts off of them” OOF such an important read. This book dives head first into a fictional tale on how small acceptance of micro aggressions can explode into general acceptance of blatant racism. How far will white ignorance and privilege go just because you’re friends with/infatuated with the people making those comments? An absolute must read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    A good book, and the author is brave and smart enough not to end it with the heroine having a revelation or taking a stand. Sometimes your victories are small and your feelings are mixed, and Shania is going through a lot (grief and uncertainty along with the discovery of her white privilege) that complicates her perspective. A reader can sit out here objectively and go "Oh no honey not that, nooooooo", but she's in the thick of it. A good book, and the author is brave and smart enough not to end it with the heroine having a revelation or taking a stand. Sometimes your victories are small and your feelings are mixed, and Shania is going through a lot (grief and uncertainty along with the discovery of her white privilege) that complicates her perspective. A reader can sit out here objectively and go "Oh no honey not that, nooooooo", but she's in the thick of it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Gregory

    Very interesting premise that many YA readers will benefit from, but I think elements of this book weren't executed as well as they could have been. Some of the characters are too unrealistic, and even some of Shania's naivete is as well. But there is a good bit of dialogue and plot that will provide some excellent book club discussions. Very interesting premise that many YA readers will benefit from, but I think elements of this book weren't executed as well as they could have been. Some of the characters are too unrealistic, and even some of Shania's naivete is as well. But there is a good bit of dialogue and plot that will provide some excellent book club discussions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Krissy Ronan

    Interesting premise and a few characters stood out with their realistic complexity. A little heavy-handed by the end but overall a satisfying journey. Thank you, Little Brown Books and Edelweiss + for the advanced copy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Passano

    This is the kind of book I wish I could have given my younger self to read. Growing up I thought I was better than my privilege because I proclaimed that I saw no color. Very powerful book and I would highly recommend to even precocious tween readers.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ellie M

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Unless there's going to be a second book, the ending didn't feel like an ending at all and it was like someone just cut out the real ending and left the previous chapter in. Everything else was good, though. Unless there's going to be a second book, the ending didn't feel like an ending at all and it was like someone just cut out the real ending and left the previous chapter in. Everything else was good, though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I really wanted to love this book because I think the message is so important but I hated Shania every step of the way and the ending was… not an ending… This book took me so long to get through. I think I would have enjoyed it so much more through the lens of Michelle or even Catherine.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Bowman

    A subtle exploration of the lies we tell ourselves to avoid the discomfort of white privilege.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carter Milic

    Ick hated it

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