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Madder: A Memoir in Weeds

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Madder, matter, mater--a weed, a state of mind, a material, a meaning, a mother. Poet and horticulturist Marco Wilkinson searches for the roots of myths and memories among plant families and family trees. "My life, these weeds." Marco Wilkinson's intimate vignettes of intergenerational migration, queer sexuality, and willful forgetting use the language of plants as both str Madder, matter, mater--a weed, a state of mind, a material, a meaning, a mother. Poet and horticulturist Marco Wilkinson searches for the roots of myths and memories among plant families and family trees. "My life, these weeds." Marco Wilkinson's intimate vignettes of intergenerational migration, queer sexuality, and willful forgetting use the language of plants as both structure and metaphor--particularly weeds: invisible yet ubiquitous, unwanted yet abundant, out-of-place yet flourishing. Madder combines meditations on nature with memories of Wilkinson's Rhode Island childhood and glimpses of his maternal family's life in Uruguay. The son of a fierce immigrant mother who tried to erase his absent father from their lives, Wilkinson investigates his heritage with a mixture of anger and empathy as he wrestles with the ambiguity of the past. Using a verdant iconography rich with wordplay and symbolism, Wilkinsonoffers a mesmerizing portrait of finding belonging in an uprooted world.


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Madder, matter, mater--a weed, a state of mind, a material, a meaning, a mother. Poet and horticulturist Marco Wilkinson searches for the roots of myths and memories among plant families and family trees. "My life, these weeds." Marco Wilkinson's intimate vignettes of intergenerational migration, queer sexuality, and willful forgetting use the language of plants as both str Madder, matter, mater--a weed, a state of mind, a material, a meaning, a mother. Poet and horticulturist Marco Wilkinson searches for the roots of myths and memories among plant families and family trees. "My life, these weeds." Marco Wilkinson's intimate vignettes of intergenerational migration, queer sexuality, and willful forgetting use the language of plants as both structure and metaphor--particularly weeds: invisible yet ubiquitous, unwanted yet abundant, out-of-place yet flourishing. Madder combines meditations on nature with memories of Wilkinson's Rhode Island childhood and glimpses of his maternal family's life in Uruguay. The son of a fierce immigrant mother who tried to erase his absent father from their lives, Wilkinson investigates his heritage with a mixture of anger and empathy as he wrestles with the ambiguity of the past. Using a verdant iconography rich with wordplay and symbolism, Wilkinsonoffers a mesmerizing portrait of finding belonging in an uprooted world.

31 review for Madder: A Memoir in Weeds

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura Sackton

    I absolutely loved this book. Read my review here: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/... I absolutely loved this book. Read my review here: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre Danklin

  3. 4 out of 5

    Logann

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hrycyk

  5. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  6. 4 out of 5

    Basia

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melon109

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeb Haley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bree

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne (The Novel Sanctuary)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katya Buresh

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Dostal

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Valley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Cavar

  22. 5 out of 5

    Akiva

  23. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Becker

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Sullivan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terry Zimmer

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Handspiker

  30. 5 out of 5

    TheBohemianBookworm

  31. 5 out of 5

    Elissa Boisvert

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