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Talking to Canadians

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Canada’s beloved comic genius tells his own story for the first time. What is Rick Mercer going to do now? That was the question on everyone’s lips when the beloved comedian retired his hugely successful TV show after 15 seasons—and at the peak of its popularity. The answer came not long after, when he roared back in a new role as stand-up-comedian, playing to sold-out hou Canada’s beloved comic genius tells his own story for the first time. What is Rick Mercer going to do now? That was the question on everyone’s lips when the beloved comedian retired his hugely successful TV show after 15 seasons—and at the peak of its popularity. The answer came not long after, when he roared back in a new role as stand-up-comedian, playing to sold-out houses wherever he appeared. And then Covid-19 struck. And his legions of fans began asking again: What is Rick Mercer going to do now? Well, for one thing, he’s been writing a comic masterpiece. For the first time, this most private of public figures has turned the spotlight on himself, in a memoir that’s as revealing as it is hilarious. In riveting anecdotal style, Rick charts his rise from highly unpromising schoolboy (in his reports “the word ‘disappointment’ appeared a fair bit”) to the heights of TV fame. Along the way came an amazing break when, not long out of his teens, his one-man show Show Me the Button, I’ll Push It. Or, Charles Lynch Must Die, became an overnight sensation—thanks in part to a bizarre ambush by its target, Charles Lynch himself. That’s one story you won’t soon forget, and this book is full of them. There’s a tale of how little Rick helped himself to a tree from the neighbours’ garden that’s set to become a new Christmas classic. There’s Rick the aspiring actor, braving “the scariest thing I have ever done in my life” by performing with the Newfoundland Shakespeare Company; unforgettable scenes with politicians of every variety, from Jean Chretien to George W. Bush to Stockwell Day; and a wealth of behind-the-scenes revelations about the origins and making of This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Made in Canada, and Talking to Americans. All leading of course to the greenlighting of that mega-hit, Rick Mercer Report . . . It’s a life so packed with incident (did we mention Bosnia and Kabul?) and laughter we can only hope that a future answer to “What is Rick Mercer going to do now?” is: “Write volume two.”


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Canada’s beloved comic genius tells his own story for the first time. What is Rick Mercer going to do now? That was the question on everyone’s lips when the beloved comedian retired his hugely successful TV show after 15 seasons—and at the peak of its popularity. The answer came not long after, when he roared back in a new role as stand-up-comedian, playing to sold-out hou Canada’s beloved comic genius tells his own story for the first time. What is Rick Mercer going to do now? That was the question on everyone’s lips when the beloved comedian retired his hugely successful TV show after 15 seasons—and at the peak of its popularity. The answer came not long after, when he roared back in a new role as stand-up-comedian, playing to sold-out houses wherever he appeared. And then Covid-19 struck. And his legions of fans began asking again: What is Rick Mercer going to do now? Well, for one thing, he’s been writing a comic masterpiece. For the first time, this most private of public figures has turned the spotlight on himself, in a memoir that’s as revealing as it is hilarious. In riveting anecdotal style, Rick charts his rise from highly unpromising schoolboy (in his reports “the word ‘disappointment’ appeared a fair bit”) to the heights of TV fame. Along the way came an amazing break when, not long out of his teens, his one-man show Show Me the Button, I’ll Push It. Or, Charles Lynch Must Die, became an overnight sensation—thanks in part to a bizarre ambush by its target, Charles Lynch himself. That’s one story you won’t soon forget, and this book is full of them. There’s a tale of how little Rick helped himself to a tree from the neighbours’ garden that’s set to become a new Christmas classic. There’s Rick the aspiring actor, braving “the scariest thing I have ever done in my life” by performing with the Newfoundland Shakespeare Company; unforgettable scenes with politicians of every variety, from Jean Chretien to George W. Bush to Stockwell Day; and a wealth of behind-the-scenes revelations about the origins and making of This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Made in Canada, and Talking to Americans. All leading of course to the greenlighting of that mega-hit, Rick Mercer Report . . . It’s a life so packed with incident (did we mention Bosnia and Kabul?) and laughter we can only hope that a future answer to “What is Rick Mercer going to do now?” is: “Write volume two.”

30 review for Talking to Canadians

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    If you like large helpings of humour with your autobiographies, Talking to Canadians by Rick Mercer is the one for you. I have had the pleasure of listening to the audiobook, read by the author, which by itself adds more comedy to the book: Mercer retells stories of his life with tongue firmly planted in cheek. He begins with stories of family life when he was a child, then on to school days, and then of his life as he navigated his career in comedy. Each chapter deals with a different part of h If you like large helpings of humour with your autobiographies, Talking to Canadians by Rick Mercer is the one for you. I have had the pleasure of listening to the audiobook, read by the author, which by itself adds more comedy to the book: Mercer retells stories of his life with tongue firmly planted in cheek. He begins with stories of family life when he was a child, then on to school days, and then of his life as he navigated his career in comedy. Each chapter deals with a different part of his life and spending time with this book has proven to be hilarious and enchanting. This is a book well worth reading during a pandemic or at any other time. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    American TV has always treated Canada with patronizing goodwill and stereotypes, but what choice did Canadian viewers have but to endure yet another igloo and maple syrup joke? Watch low budget Canadian content? We weren't that desperate! My mom would always insist Canadian movies were just as good, better even, as they weren't so "Hollywood". I didn't buy it. It was just another one of those mom lines like: "Cleaning your room can be fun with the right attitude" and "Homemade pizza tastes the s American TV has always treated Canada with patronizing goodwill and stereotypes, but what choice did Canadian viewers have but to endure yet another igloo and maple syrup joke? Watch low budget Canadian content? We weren't that desperate! My mom would always insist Canadian movies were just as good, better even, as they weren't so "Hollywood". I didn't buy it. It was just another one of those mom lines like: "Cleaning your room can be fun with the right attitude" and "Homemade pizza tastes the same as Pizza Hut." But then along came--22 Minutes--Funny, fast as a rocket, and unabashedly Canadian. Sure, as a kid I didn't get the Preston Manning jokes, but a few seconds later, a crazy warrior princess would burst into the Prime Minister's office--that I understood! The subversiveness of it all made me giddy! And when Talking to Americans came out in 2001, it changed the nation itself. Don't even try to deny it, we all lost our goddamn minds. Sure it started this somewhat toxic trend of shit-talking Americans, but hey! After Gretzky retired, Canada needed a new national pastime. "Talking to Canadians" was such a fun read, and it reminded me of how much Rick Mercer and "22 Minutes" meant to me when I was growing up. As an adult I have sort of discounted Rick Mercer as a pale, Canadian imitation of a satirist. He is a milquetoast Jon Stewart, who blunted his comedic rapier in middle age for the sake of pandering TV segments that tugged on the heart strings. A lot of these misgivings melted away as I read the book. I related way too much to young Rick to dismiss him completely--His terrible grades, his only skill being his ability to talk loudly and quickly into a camera, and most of all--his flair for being a spiteful, conniving pain in the ass. He tells one story about starting his own school newspaper called "The Competition" just to spite the teachers for kicking him out of the school paper (after he stacked the vote with randos to become editor in chief). The rival paper becomes wildly popular, selling out multiple runs, and gets Mercer in huge trouble with the principal. However, having made his point, he loses all interest and disbands "The Competition" immediately. I've never identified more with a person in a story than I have with Rick in that one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    I’ve watched Rick Merced for years, and laughed lots at his performances. Reading about his life and how hard he worked to produce skits and shows had me frequently in stitches.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This book had me laughing at loud many times! Rick Mercer starts with stories of his childhood and his parents. These tales are funny and sweet. As he moved through his life I got to know a bit of what makes him tick. Rick's early forays into theatre as a stage manager are hilarious. Thank goodness a teacher and mentor recognized his writing talent and steered him in that direction. When he gets older and his career and TV life are getting established this book is a treasure trove of CBC history This book had me laughing at loud many times! Rick Mercer starts with stories of his childhood and his parents. These tales are funny and sweet. As he moved through his life I got to know a bit of what makes him tick. Rick's early forays into theatre as a stage manager are hilarious. Thank goodness a teacher and mentor recognized his writing talent and steered him in that direction. When he gets older and his career and TV life are getting established this book is a treasure trove of CBC history. The "Talking to Americans" bits are hilarious....and a bit sad. Really folks - learn about the world outside your borders! This book is about Rick Mercer - his life and his career. It's told with wit, humour and honesty. I strongly recommend that you get this book and enjoy it anytime you want to read about a life that has been lived fully and is ready for more!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    *4.5 This makes me miss the Mercer Report even more… such a great Canadian talent! Love this guy!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Loved it! I have so missed my weekly dose of The Mercer Report, this filled the gap for a few days. Already put the audiobook on hold, so I can listen to Rick's narration. I'll ration out the chapters this time. Already looking forward to Volume Two! Loved it! I have so missed my weekly dose of The Mercer Report, this filled the gap for a few days. Already put the audiobook on hold, so I can listen to Rick's narration. I'll ration out the chapters this time. Already looking forward to Volume Two!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    It’s been a while since I stayed up stupidly late to read a book, I simply had a hard time putting it down. It hit so many nostalgic memories & references for growing up in Newfoundland and in Canada, especially with news, politics, & pop culture. It was also fascinating to read the trajectory of Rick Mercer’s career.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Now, I'm no Charles Lynch, but I'm here to tell you that you should not walk, but run to read Talking to Canadians! It's everything I wanted it to be and more. I had the pleasure of listening to an audio ARC so thank you to Libro.fm for offering me the opportunity to spend the whole book waiting for a call from the landlord to tell me I was disrupting the neighbours. That's right, I laughed so loudly and so often that I am confident I frightened the neighbour's cat. It all started with a comment Now, I'm no Charles Lynch, but I'm here to tell you that you should not walk, but run to read Talking to Canadians! It's everything I wanted it to be and more. I had the pleasure of listening to an audio ARC so thank you to Libro.fm for offering me the opportunity to spend the whole book waiting for a call from the landlord to tell me I was disrupting the neighbours. That's right, I laughed so loudly and so often that I am confident I frightened the neighbour's cat. It all started with a comment about a boiler, a corkscrew, and a glowstick. In addition to some truly hilarious one liners, this memoir is full of heartwarming stories about Rick Mercer's childhood and time spent learning the ropes of theatre, television, and interviewing strangers on the streets of America. There's no sensationalizing, or scandalous tell-all aspects to this book. Instead, it's a love letter to everyone who has ever inspired him. It's a lovely comedic meditation on a life lived well, with joy and gratitude, that I will most certainly read again. Seriously, do not be fooled by the taciturn looking gentleman on the cover. I heard the smile in his voice throughout the entire book. Also, I do believe that this memoir is mistitled. A more accurate title would be Rick Mercer Thanks Canadians. Yes, Gerald. I paid attention. Rick's name is on the top of the bill.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex Bright

    4.5 stars, rounded down This is, ostensibly, the memoir of one of Canada's greatest satirists and comedians. In reality, as the title suggests, it's more about Canada and Canadians. Rick loves Canada and loves its people, despite all our problems, and it's obvious he takes immense joy in both. The stories and jokes come fast and I found myself laughing out loud a lot -- and even tearing up a couple of times. It's extremely entertaining, especially for fans of Mercer and/or Canadian politics. So w 4.5 stars, rounded down This is, ostensibly, the memoir of one of Canada's greatest satirists and comedians. In reality, as the title suggests, it's more about Canada and Canadians. Rick loves Canada and loves its people, despite all our problems, and it's obvious he takes immense joy in both. The stories and jokes come fast and I found myself laughing out loud a lot -- and even tearing up a couple of times. It's extremely entertaining, especially for fans of Mercer and/or Canadian politics. So why did I round down? There was a certain lack of vulnerability on his own part. I mean, he is definitely self-deprecating and does discuss growing up gay in the 70s and 80s, but there's something a little impersonal about it all. I was hoping to get to know him a little better, but every paragraph has to end with a quip. Still, that's all I can fault it for.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marci Laevens

    This could be a 4.5. I’d forgotten about how much I loved these shows, 22 minutes, Talking to Americans, Made in Canada and The Mercer Report. Rick Mercer is a cool guy…I think we’d be good friends 😂

  11. 4 out of 5

    Teena in Toronto

    I like reading bios/autobios and I like Rick Mercer and that's why I read this book. Rick Mercer was born 50+ years ago in St. John's, Newfoundland and these are his stories of his family, friends, career and spouse. School wasn't his thing but once he discovered entertaining, he knew it was what he wanted to do. After being part of some groups, he hit it big with a one-man show with the name of a journalist in the title ... and it caught the attention of the journalist who staged mock confrontat I like reading bios/autobios and I like Rick Mercer and that's why I read this book. Rick Mercer was born 50+ years ago in St. John's, Newfoundland and these are his stories of his family, friends, career and spouse. School wasn't his thing but once he discovered entertaining, he knew it was what he wanted to do. After being part of some groups, he hit it big with a one-man show with the name of a journalist in the title ... and it caught the attention of the journalist who staged mock confrontations, which publicized it even more. From there he went on to create and be a part of This Hour Has 22 Minutes and Made in Canada. He tells of heading to the U.S. for Talking to Americans segments and was amazed at how much the Americans really don't know much about Canada. It was interesting to read about his experiences with the members of our Armed Forces. The book ends just before The Rick Mercer Report. I liked the writing style. It was honest and amusing at times ... I could "hear" Rick's voice in the writing. Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2021/11...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ml Lalonde

    Rick Mercer is as Canadian as spicy Clamato with a side of butter tart. This gentle and gently humorous retelling of his life is as warm and witty as he is. There must be something in the water in Newfoundland. Some lovely laugh out loud moments, peppered with some behind the scene stories that include Jean Chretien, Stockwell (Doris) Day, Canadian George W Bush and Canadian Peacekeepers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karejorr

    Rick Mercer does not disappoint! A hilarious yet informative reflection on his career in acting and television, from his start on stage to This Hour Has 22 Minutes. I laughed out loud as he recounted stories about his Talking to Americans segments. I remember watching those on TV and laughing but also being shocked about how ignorant some Americans were about Canada. I rewatched the special on YouTube and laughed some more. I recommend listening to the audiobook as Rick narrates it and you get t Rick Mercer does not disappoint! A hilarious yet informative reflection on his career in acting and television, from his start on stage to This Hour Has 22 Minutes. I laughed out loud as he recounted stories about his Talking to Americans segments. I remember watching those on TV and laughing but also being shocked about how ignorant some Americans were about Canada. I rewatched the special on YouTube and laughed some more. I recommend listening to the audiobook as Rick narrates it and you get the full effect of his stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janine Bowyer

    As A big fan of Rick Mercer- I enjoyed the book- however it ended chronologically before the Mercer Report/ which I would love to have heard more about. Skimmed a bit of the book- but some lovely details about This Hour Has 22 Minutes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    April

    Funny, heartfelt and just a really great read. The Bosnia story brought tears to my eyes. It was fun reading about Rick’s school years and growing up in my home province. I’m not super political but I enjoyed those stories as well - especially the one with former Prime Minister Jean Chretien. What an incredible life and in sharing the stories, I like him even more. Rick gets softer, kinder and a little more compassionate over time - I love that. Looking forward to Volume 2.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tonia

    I’m a Canadian that did not grow up in Canada. Shows like 22 Minutes and Rick Mercer gave me glimpses into this amazing and diverse country once I moved here in my early 20’s. I need to catch up on a few Canadiana shows though. CODCO? Grand Band? Made in Canada? Thanks for this fun and interesting memoir. More Canada research for me to enjoy from its pages! Looking forward to the book’s sequel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This was a fun and light read that felt a bit like exploring my own path with Mercer. He came to fame with 22 Minutes as I was coming of age so his musings and experiences with Canadian history and politics resonated well with me. I read this as an audiobook and really enjoyed hearing it in Mercer’s own voice.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Rick Mercer, one of Canada’s comedic treasures, gives us exactly what you’d expect in this memoir: stories of his childhood, teen years and adult professional years on television, all told with a healthy dose of humour and unabashedly “Canadian”. Rick’s voice shines through as we read about everything from how as a boy he stole a Christmas tree for his family, to his rise to fame despite the fact he never graduated from high school. My favourite chapters dealt with some of his most famous (and h Rick Mercer, one of Canada’s comedic treasures, gives us exactly what you’d expect in this memoir: stories of his childhood, teen years and adult professional years on television, all told with a healthy dose of humour and unabashedly “Canadian”. Rick’s voice shines through as we read about everything from how as a boy he stole a Christmas tree for his family, to his rise to fame despite the fact he never graduated from high school. My favourite chapters dealt with some of his most famous (and hilarious) television ventures, including the most-watched comedy special in Canadian history (“Talking to Americans”) and his encounters with various political leaders (and how he came to interview Prime Minister Jean Chretien in Harveys while chowing down on a hamburger). I remember watching the Chretien segment and being blown away. Was this somehow faked? How did he get the Prime Minister to agree to do this? It was so funny and bizarre, it seemed surreal. My only fault with this book is that there are only a few pages at the end that deal with his solo television series that lasted 15 seasons on CBC: The Rick Mercer Report. I loved that show... so original, so funny, so sincere, and so Canadian. You can tell he loves Canada and is proud to be a Newfoundlander! I can only assume he has plans for a second volume that will cover this part of his life. When it comes out, I’ll be first in line to read it! My one regret is that I didn't listen to this one on audio. It would have been great to listen to Rick's story as told in his own voice.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Enid Wray

    This book made me laugh… and made me cry, more than once! He had me right from the very start. This is a feel good book, one that takes someone of my vintage down memory lane… although I’ll admit that I don’t think I ever watched Made in Canada… and while I have watched most every episode of the Rick Mercer Report that has only been in my post-retirement life in re-run thanks to my trusty PVR. (What TV days I might have had pretty much ended in 1997 with having a kid and working full-time… and I This book made me laugh… and made me cry, more than once! He had me right from the very start. This is a feel good book, one that takes someone of my vintage down memory lane… although I’ll admit that I don’t think I ever watched Made in Canada… and while I have watched most every episode of the Rick Mercer Report that has only been in my post-retirement life in re-run thanks to my trusty PVR. (What TV days I might have had pretty much ended in 1997 with having a kid and working full-time… and I never really cared much for TV anyway… so I fit right in with the Mercer parental units). This book has heart - a great big heart. Like his shows - in his ‘less cynical’ middle age - this book is a celebration of all things Canadian. Yes, it is ‘about’ Rick Mercer, but it is about so much more. And yes, Rick Mercer is at the centre - but really, he is just the vehicle through which the story is told. And yes, Rick Mercer most definitely does wear his heart on his sleeve, as you would expect. This is the story of a nation told through one particular lens… about we as a nation - small and large… about how community is built, and about how we come to consensus on the shared values that truly matter to us both as individuals and as a nation. And about the ways in which we don’t take ourselves too seriously - how we are able to poke good natured fun at each other, and why that is so important. This is Rick bringing us together, helping us to remember that we are all more alike than we are different. Warning, it took me a lot longer to read this than it should have - because I kept popping out to the web to find various segments or episodes and watch them again while I was reading. Highly recommended. Watching for the publication date for Volume Two to be announced.

  20. 5 out of 5

    MaryLou Driedger

    The first chapters of this autobiography were very funny and entertaining and offered readers a glimpse into part of Rick Mercer's personal life as a child and teen. I really enjoyed it and laughed out loud a number of times. The rest of the book? It is basically a blow by blow account of Rick's rise to stardom and the years he spent doing the show This Hour Has 22 Minutes. I realize he has already written about his time doing the Rick Mercer Report in a previous book but I was hoping to hear mo The first chapters of this autobiography were very funny and entertaining and offered readers a glimpse into part of Rick Mercer's personal life as a child and teen. I really enjoyed it and laughed out loud a number of times. The rest of the book? It is basically a blow by blow account of Rick's rise to stardom and the years he spent doing the show This Hour Has 22 Minutes. I realize he has already written about his time doing the Rick Mercer Report in a previous book but I was hoping to hear more interesting anecdotes from the show that ran for fifteen years. It is through The Rick Mercer Report that I got to know Rick best and appreciate what a fine comedian he is. I just loved the way he showcased the best of our country. In less than a page in Talking to Canadians Rick describes how he got together with his life partner Gerald and after that Rick doesn't reflect at all on what it was like to be a gay man and a national star at a time before same-sex marriage was legal. I guess I thought reading about that might provide a helpful historical perspective for those in the LGBTQ community and their allies. I get it that Rick wants to keep his private life private. I respect that. But I have to admit I was hoping for a little more information about his personal life and a little less information about his career.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    Rick Mercer is one of my favourite comedians. He has hosted satirical news shows, such as The Rick Mercer Report and This Hour Has 22 Minutes, as well as many Canadian awards shows. In this memoir, he talks about his early life and how he got into show business. He’s had a fascinating career that has led him to becoming one of the funniest Canadian entertainers. My top 3 favourite comedians are from Newfoundland: Jonny Harris, Mark Critch, and Rick Mercer. The beginning of this memoir was set in Rick Mercer is one of my favourite comedians. He has hosted satirical news shows, such as The Rick Mercer Report and This Hour Has 22 Minutes, as well as many Canadian awards shows. In this memoir, he talks about his early life and how he got into show business. He’s had a fascinating career that has led him to becoming one of the funniest Canadian entertainers. My top 3 favourite comedians are from Newfoundland: Jonny Harris, Mark Critch, and Rick Mercer. The beginning of this memoir was set in Newfoundland during Rick’s childhood. I traveled to Newfoundland a couple of years ago and I have family who lives in Newfoundland (in Bishop’s Falls which also got a little cameo appearance in this memoir). Canada, and particularly Newfoundland, are such small places that even one of my English university professors was mentioned in this book. All of the Canadian references really made me feel connected to this book. I’ve watched both of Rick’s shows since I was a child. I’ve been a fan of his for as long as I can remember. Many of his best jokes were in this memoir, including his segment called Talking to Americans. He would interview Americans and tell them made up things about Canada that they believed. I remember watching one episode where he told people in an American city that Canada was going to start using the 24 hour clock. They congratulated the country on adopting this way of counting time. This was some of his classic comedy, that made me laugh out loud many times while reading this book. Talking to Canadians is a hilarious Canadian memoir! Thank you Penguin Random House Canada for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    A fairly quick and thoroughly entertaining read from a national comedic icon. Rick Mercer's early-life anecdotes are whimsical insights into borderline delinquency and life in the Newfoundland arts community. His behind-the-curtains revelations about the making of Talking to Americans, This Hour Has 22 Minutes, and more are provocative accounts of comedy-as-fifth-estate. While part of the latter is reflected in overtly Liberal politics and a romanticism toward military adventures, this sentiment A fairly quick and thoroughly entertaining read from a national comedic icon. Rick Mercer's early-life anecdotes are whimsical insights into borderline delinquency and life in the Newfoundland arts community. His behind-the-curtains revelations about the making of Talking to Americans, This Hour Has 22 Minutes, and more are provocative accounts of comedy-as-fifth-estate. While part of the latter is reflected in overtly Liberal politics and a romanticism toward military adventures, this sentiment does not prevent the narrative from building an endearing personality. If you're open to reading any memoirs or autobiographies this year, and if you grew up with or are a fan of Rick Mercer's work, then this one's worth checking out.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Probably the funniest memoir I’ve ever read. I’ve always loved Rick Mercer and his TV endeavours. As a Canadian, this book is something I can relate to, culturally and politically. But Mercer has the talent of putting human interaction and achievement at the forefront of what is important. That is what made this such an enjoyable read, alongside Mercer’s quick wit and satirical perspective.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Loved it. Wished I could have watched some of these old specials he talked about!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nanci

    An entertaining read and a great reminder of the hilarious skits from This Hour has 22 Minutes and the Mercer Report. Worth checking out.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    A thoroughly enjoyable book, filled with the humour we have come to expect from Rick Mercer. I have watched his TV shows, so it was very interesting to get a "behind the scenes" look. This is, however, more a "professional" memoir (i.e. his work life) rather than a "personal" memoir. A thoroughly enjoyable book, filled with the humour we have come to expect from Rick Mercer. I have watched his TV shows, so it was very interesting to get a "behind the scenes" look. This is, however, more a "professional" memoir (i.e. his work life) rather than a "personal" memoir.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Artur Wilczynski

    Enjoyed reading Rick’s book. Tells the stories of key moments in his career. It’s funny and clearly conveys his love for Newfoundland. The writing is light and funny. A times it can be poignant. All in all a good read by a Canadian comic icon.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Richardson

    This was great! I miss his rants on his Monday Report!

  29. 4 out of 5

    magconnect

    hey this book is really nice and you can read this once good book nice to read once. visit for best food franchise in India albaik franchise to know more. and if you want full IT services then visit web development company in India in kanpur, India for the best development services in India. albaik franchise in india hey this book is really nice and you can read this once good book nice to read once. visit for best food franchise in India albaik franchise to know more. and if you want full IT services then visit web development company in India in kanpur, India for the best development services in India. albaik franchise in india

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Read this. You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. But more than that, it’s a terrific chronicle of a kid from Newfoundland who became a Canadian icon. Did I mention? You’ll laugh.

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