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Jules Verne's Lighthouse

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In this adaptation of the Jules Verne classic, set in the year 2717, The Lighthouse is a supercomputer the size of a skyscraper that guides space craft through a turbulent sea of wormholes. Maria Vasquez has chosen this isolated base to escape her troubled past, but now she and her glitchy nanny bot, Moses, are the only ones who can stop a crew of murderous pirates from se In this adaptation of the Jules Verne classic, set in the year 2717, The Lighthouse is a supercomputer the size of a skyscraper that guides space craft through a turbulent sea of wormholes. Maria Vasquez has chosen this isolated base to escape her troubled past, but now she and her glitchy nanny bot, Moses, are the only ones who can stop a crew of murderous pirates from seizing the most devastating weapons ever created. COLLECTS JULES VERNE'S LIGHTHOUSE #1-5


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In this adaptation of the Jules Verne classic, set in the year 2717, The Lighthouse is a supercomputer the size of a skyscraper that guides space craft through a turbulent sea of wormholes. Maria Vasquez has chosen this isolated base to escape her troubled past, but now she and her glitchy nanny bot, Moses, are the only ones who can stop a crew of murderous pirates from se In this adaptation of the Jules Verne classic, set in the year 2717, The Lighthouse is a supercomputer the size of a skyscraper that guides space craft through a turbulent sea of wormholes. Maria Vasquez has chosen this isolated base to escape her troubled past, but now she and her glitchy nanny bot, Moses, are the only ones who can stop a crew of murderous pirates from seizing the most devastating weapons ever created. COLLECTS JULES VERNE'S LIGHTHOUSE #1-5

34 review for Jules Verne's Lighthouse

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I've never read the Verne novel this is based on, so I can't say anything about whether it's adapted well or not. I can judge it on its own, and I'm afraid it's not very good. The story never surprises or becomes thrilling, the characters are made of cardboard, the dialogue is cheesy and, at times, simply cringe inducing. I bounce hard off of Haberlin's cell-shaded mannequin-y art style, every woman looking like a Suicide Girls reject (two female characters looking near identical). I will say it' I've never read the Verne novel this is based on, so I can't say anything about whether it's adapted well or not. I can judge it on its own, and I'm afraid it's not very good. The story never surprises or becomes thrilling, the characters are made of cardboard, the dialogue is cheesy and, at times, simply cringe inducing. I bounce hard off of Haberlin's cell-shaded mannequin-y art style, every woman looking like a Suicide Girls reject (two female characters looking near identical). I will say it's slightly better with the robotic/cybernetic characters. (Picked up a review copy through Edelweiss)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Well I didn't know "The Lighthouse at the End of the World" before this evening, and I certainly haven't read it – even now. For this space opera really is at a fair remove from the original. It is, however, quite good fun. A woman in charge of a most remote navigating beacon is forced into a rollicking adventure when space pirates turn up unannounced and unexpected, hijack the station and wait in line for another ship not scheduled to be turning up – a ship containing a lot of bad memories for Well I didn't know "The Lighthouse at the End of the World" before this evening, and I certainly haven't read it – even now. For this space opera really is at a fair remove from the original. It is, however, quite good fun. A woman in charge of a most remote navigating beacon is forced into a rollicking adventure when space pirates turn up unannounced and unexpected, hijack the station and wait in line for another ship not scheduled to be turning up – a ship containing a lot of bad memories for our lass, as well as the potential death of humanity... It's a story that manages to have quite a lot of scope to it, considering it contains a bare minimum of locations and not many speaking parts – although partly that scope comes from the afters of a space war being relevant to things. I think by the time you consider the additional characters, such as the woman's family's defensive robot helper/servant/friend, you're leaving a straight sci-fi analogue of the original Verne far behind, but I didn't find that objectionable. This felt like a rounded, confidently-wrought piece, and not something trying to trace round antique shadows and just fill them in a different colour. It is on the side of being entertainment, as opposed to being a story about big themes, and entertaining is what I thought it was, most successfully. A strong four stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This graphic novel presents a loose adaptation of “The Lighthouse at the End of the World,” taking the story into space opera-like territory. Verne’s story is set on Earth in the Atlantic Ocean near Cape Horn at the southern tip of the Americas. Hine’s is set in a remote region of deep space that requires a beacon to navigate through a treacherous aggregation of wormholes. (I don’t know whether the latter is even remotely in compliance with the laws of physics, but the concept of a deep space na This graphic novel presents a loose adaptation of “The Lighthouse at the End of the World,” taking the story into space opera-like territory. Verne’s story is set on Earth in the Atlantic Ocean near Cape Horn at the southern tip of the Americas. Hine’s is set in a remote region of deep space that requires a beacon to navigate through a treacherous aggregation of wormholes. (I don’t know whether the latter is even remotely in compliance with the laws of physics, but the concept of a deep space navigational station seems perfectly feasible so I was untroubled by the details. An Astronomy majors’ experience may vary. In general, the book doesn’t seem to be written as hard sci-fi.) Hine borrows Verne’s idea of a remote navigational beacon being taken over by pirates, and a survivor of the “lighthouse” crew working to foil the pirates’ plot, as well as drawing on some character details. However, it’s not meant to be a beat-for-beat retelling of Verne’s story set in the future and in space. There are many differences of plot and character from the source material. Besides robots and aliens, there is much greater diversity in the cast. I found the story compelling. The source premise of being far from help and at a severe disadvantage is thrilling, and I think Hine did a fine job of taking the story into the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    A modern interpretation of this classic novel in comic form. This science fiction comic series takes the plot of the Jules Verne novel and produces an enjoyable, dramatic and action-packed story about piracy in space with a back story to boost the plot. There are some interesting characters and the artwork allows some fascinating twists. It’s well-produced and a vIsual treat. I received a copy of this in exchange for an honest review

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    I don't normally hold with comics adaptations of prose, but this had a David Hine credit and he doesn't do enough comics, so I thought I'd take a look. Alas, turns out he's only co-writing, and that's not counting Verne, whose fairly realistic original is here transposed to space for no terribly good reason, becoming wholly generic SF in the process. (Edelweiss ARC) I don't normally hold with comics adaptations of prose, but this had a David Hine credit and he doesn't do enough comics, so I thought I'd take a look. Alas, turns out he's only co-writing, and that's not counting Verne, whose fairly realistic original is here transposed to space for no terribly good reason, becoming wholly generic SF in the process. (Edelweiss ARC)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda [Novel Addiction]

    Very good read. Exciting, well illustrated... I wouldn't have picked this up on my own, so I'm glad Library Journal sent me this to review! My review will be published in Library Journal magazine at some point in the future. Very good read. Exciting, well illustrated... I wouldn't have picked this up on my own, so I'm glad Library Journal sent me this to review! My review will be published in Library Journal magazine at some point in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dan Blackley

    Not a very entertaining graphic novel. Was mostly disappointed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Zimmer

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nowenen

  12. 5 out of 5

    Renato

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jared Beattie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Travis

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mario Alba

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Petar

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

  20. 5 out of 5

    DZMM

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

  22. 5 out of 5

    James

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Thornton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert Marsh

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  27. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Moses

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Paletta

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mary Wyman

  31. 4 out of 5

    h

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lugermorph

  33. 4 out of 5

    Myan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Paul Porry

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