Hot Best Seller

Learning America: One Woman’s Fight for Educational Justice for Refugee Children

Availability: Ready to download

A visionary leader’s powerful personal story and a blueprint for change that will inspire schools and communities across America Luma Mufleh—a Muslim woman, a gay refugee from hyper-conservative Jordan—joins a pick-up game of soccer in Clarkston, Georgia.  The players, 11- and 12-year-olds from Liberia and Afghanistan and Sudan, have attended local schools for years.  Drawn A visionary leader’s powerful personal story and a blueprint for change that will inspire schools and communities across America Luma Mufleh—a Muslim woman, a gay refugee from hyper-conservative Jordan—joins a pick-up game of soccer in Clarkston, Georgia.  The players, 11- and 12-year-olds from Liberia and Afghanistan and Sudan, have attended local schools for years.  Drawn in as coach of a ragtag but fiercely competitive team, Mufleh discovers that few of her players can read a word. She asks, “Where was the America that took me in? That protected me? How can I get these kids to that America?” For readers of Malala, Paul Tough, and Bryan Stevenson, Learning America is the moving and insight-packed story of how Luma Mufleh grew a soccer team into a nationally acclaimed network of schools—by homing in laserlike on what traumatized students need in order to learn. Fugees accepts only those most in need: students recruit other students, and all share a background of war, poverty, and trauma. No student passes a grade without earning it; the failure of any student is the responsibility of all. Most foundational, everyone takes art and music and everyone plays soccer, areas where students make the leaps that can and must happen—as this gifted refugee activist convinces—even for America’s most left-behind.


Compare

A visionary leader’s powerful personal story and a blueprint for change that will inspire schools and communities across America Luma Mufleh—a Muslim woman, a gay refugee from hyper-conservative Jordan—joins a pick-up game of soccer in Clarkston, Georgia.  The players, 11- and 12-year-olds from Liberia and Afghanistan and Sudan, have attended local schools for years.  Drawn A visionary leader’s powerful personal story and a blueprint for change that will inspire schools and communities across America Luma Mufleh—a Muslim woman, a gay refugee from hyper-conservative Jordan—joins a pick-up game of soccer in Clarkston, Georgia.  The players, 11- and 12-year-olds from Liberia and Afghanistan and Sudan, have attended local schools for years.  Drawn in as coach of a ragtag but fiercely competitive team, Mufleh discovers that few of her players can read a word. She asks, “Where was the America that took me in? That protected me? How can I get these kids to that America?” For readers of Malala, Paul Tough, and Bryan Stevenson, Learning America is the moving and insight-packed story of how Luma Mufleh grew a soccer team into a nationally acclaimed network of schools—by homing in laserlike on what traumatized students need in order to learn. Fugees accepts only those most in need: students recruit other students, and all share a background of war, poverty, and trauma. No student passes a grade without earning it; the failure of any student is the responsibility of all. Most foundational, everyone takes art and music and everyone plays soccer, areas where students make the leaps that can and must happen—as this gifted refugee activist convinces—even for America’s most left-behind.

30 review for Learning America: One Woman’s Fight for Educational Justice for Refugee Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    AndiReads

    As an educator and as someone who works with quite a few immigrants, I was immediately attracted to this book. This is not a boring, play -by- play story where author is less than humble and the immigrants are paraded like show ponies. This is a beautiful telling of the story of the Fugee Soccer team and The Fugees Family Non Profit/schools. It is engaging and informative without lecturing or posturing. You learn about the author, her students and the very beginnings of this amazing program via As an educator and as someone who works with quite a few immigrants, I was immediately attracted to this book. This is not a boring, play -by- play story where author is less than humble and the immigrants are paraded like show ponies. This is a beautiful telling of the story of the Fugee Soccer team and The Fugees Family Non Profit/schools. It is engaging and informative without lecturing or posturing. You learn about the author, her students and the very beginnings of this amazing program via a well written tale. Anyone interested in the plight of young immigrants will enjoy this story immensely. Best yet, there are not a series of bad then worse situations. This is a very straightforward, well written success story. Don't pick up the next top ten non fiction from NYT. Read this book - a true American book. A story of a group of students and a visionary leader (who happens to be a gay female from conservative Jordan). A powerful story of change! #LearningAmerica #marinerbooks #netgalley #netgalleyreads

  2. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Gatto

    This is an amazing book that faces many important topics: the US school system, refugees, learning English as a second language, racism just to mention a few. The author reports her point of view clearly and did great work balancing her personal experience as a refugee, her experience in the education of those kids, and more broad data and research on the topics. As an educator, I really liked the book and found many and many foods for thought.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Afaf Finan

    I wanted to read this book because I knew the author as a high school student at the school where I taught grade school. I knew her then by reputation as an exceptional person and an outstanding athlete! Over the past few years I came across impressive accounts of Luma’s work with refugee children in GA. But nothing I read in the past had prepared me for the extent of her work documented in this book. What started as a game of soccer with young refugee children led to her opening one school and I wanted to read this book because I knew the author as a high school student at the school where I taught grade school. I knew her then by reputation as an exceptional person and an outstanding athlete! Over the past few years I came across impressive accounts of Luma’s work with refugee children in GA. But nothing I read in the past had prepared me for the extent of her work documented in this book. What started as a game of soccer with young refugee children led to her opening one school and then another to help them get an education not readily available for them in public schools. Her relentless work on behalf of these children is a testament to her gifts that she shared with her students and coworkers. I would recommend this book to everyone, but especially to those with a passion for learning and teaching, and to anyone with compassion for refugees and their plight. Luma, we all knew you were a gifted person; this book shows just how!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meaghan Babin

    A really interesting read that explores the American education system. In addition to being informative, this books grapples with a lot of important themes and would be great as a learning resource.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Destiny 4everbooked

    WOWWWW!!!! This book was such an amazing read. The telling of Luma Muflehs story and her journey to where she is today and how she has impacted so many refugees lives for the better is so amazing. This book was a huge eye opener to our American school systems and how so many students, especially those new to our country, are overlooked and go without support. It’s no surprise that there’s a trillion flaws in our school systems but every chapter of this book just goes to show that there are so man WOWWWW!!!! This book was such an amazing read. The telling of Luma Muflehs story and her journey to where she is today and how she has impacted so many refugees lives for the better is so amazing. This book was a huge eye opener to our American school systems and how so many students, especially those new to our country, are overlooked and go without support. It’s no surprise that there’s a trillion flaws in our school systems but every chapter of this book just goes to show that there are so many things we can do to improve it. There’s no sugar coating in this book, you will know the true struggles of most if not all refugees, and how much they have overcome. I was on the verge of crying numerous times throughout this book, and I’m soooo glad I read it because the stories in here are those that are kept unseen from the public eyes, the stories that can’t be described in a 2 minute news story. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway and am only a substitute teacher and thought this would be a great read for me. This book will now 100% stay with me forever and be in the back of my mind when I work at the schools. I HIGHLY recommend this book to ANYONE working in the school systems no matter what job/role you play. Luma Mufleh you have my deepest respect for everything you’ve done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    Learning America is an important nexus of personal experience, refugee politics, sports, and education change. I had earlier read, as a latecomer, the true story Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, an American Town, found on Goodreads here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Luma Mufleh's book is more focused on education and experience after more years running Fugees Academy, first near here in Clarkston, Georgia, then in Columbus, Ohio, as well. Here's the Fugees Academy website: https://fuge Learning America is an important nexus of personal experience, refugee politics, sports, and education change. I had earlier read, as a latecomer, the true story Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, an American Town, found on Goodreads here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Luma Mufleh's book is more focused on education and experience after more years running Fugees Academy, first near here in Clarkston, Georgia, then in Columbus, Ohio, as well. Here's the Fugees Academy website: https://fugeesfamily.org/ I am inspired by the work and the stories told here. Highly recommended. Thanks to publisher Mariner Books for sending an Advanced Reading Copy to review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abby Heidt

    I have absolutely nothing negative to say about this book. I was hooked from the moment I picked it up. Luma Mufleh is a gay Muslim immigrant who ended up coming to America to go to college, and decided to stay because it wasn't safe for her to go back home and be who she was. One day she sees refuge boys playing soccer and decides to join in. This one event changed the course of her life. She found that most of these boys did not know a majority of English and how to read. Luma went on to create I have absolutely nothing negative to say about this book. I was hooked from the moment I picked it up. Luma Mufleh is a gay Muslim immigrant who ended up coming to America to go to college, and decided to stay because it wasn't safe for her to go back home and be who she was. One day she sees refuge boys playing soccer and decides to join in. This one event changed the course of her life. She found that most of these boys did not know a majority of English and how to read. Luma went on to create the Fugee schools, to help other refugee children learn English and know the skills that are needed once moving to America. When moving to America, many people think that it will be easy, but refugees are not always given the tools that they need to survive when moving here. More often than not, these children are not treated well by peers and by community members. I was ignorant in thinking that refugees coming to America were able to start fresh, but boy was I wrong. I am thankful to have read this book and learn more about some experiences that refugees have in this country. Though this shows some experiences, it doesn't cover all. Hopefully, more Fugee schools show up so that more children have access to education that will help them thrive in this country. I will be recommending this book to everyone I know.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    Learning America by Luma Mufleh is an inspiring account of her route to helping refugee children in America. Mufleh is a Lesbian Muslim woman from conservative Jordan. She was granted asylum entrance to the US after college. What started as a casual soccer match with children in her neighborhood developed into a school for refugee children new to America. She saw the difficulties they experienced adjusting to their new country, learning in school, and recovering from trauma. Local schools could Learning America by Luma Mufleh is an inspiring account of her route to helping refugee children in America. Mufleh is a Lesbian Muslim woman from conservative Jordan. She was granted asylum entrance to the US after college. What started as a casual soccer match with children in her neighborhood developed into a school for refugee children new to America. She saw the difficulties they experienced adjusting to their new country, learning in school, and recovering from trauma. Local schools could not offer the support they really needed to excel in their new country. Mufleh founded the Fugees Academy to better serve young people in most need. I loved reading about how the school was created and the principles it was founded on. I really enjoyed learning about the communities developed and think Learning America will be especially inspiring to educators. Thank you and NetGalley for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Stevens

    I loved this book. As a former ESL teacher immigrant and refugee issues are always on my radar, and can feel insurmountable. It is such a beacon of hope to read of an individual who sees, cares, and makes such an impact on the lives of numerous vulnerable children.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jadee

    What an amazing story. I want my kids to go to a school like the Fugees

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    I absolutely loved this book. I had literal goosebumps the entire book, especially once she began talking about the kids. This book is equal parts heartwarming and heartbreaking. The story grabbed my attention from the start and was not glorious by any means. Instead, it was raw and honest in a much-needed way. At one point, the author asks the reader to do a visualization placing them in the shoes of a refugee fleeing their home with an enemy and war on their heels. In that moment, I was thorou I absolutely loved this book. I had literal goosebumps the entire book, especially once she began talking about the kids. This book is equal parts heartwarming and heartbreaking. The story grabbed my attention from the start and was not glorious by any means. Instead, it was raw and honest in a much-needed way. At one point, the author asks the reader to do a visualization placing them in the shoes of a refugee fleeing their home with an enemy and war on their heels. In that moment, I was thoroughly crushed. I felt the dread sitting heavy in my heart and stomach. I also knew that what I was feeling wasn’t even a fraction of what they have felt. Luma told not just her story but the story of the kids and their community. I am incredibly grateful for and humbled by this story and have a greater appreciation for those who have gone through the asylum process. Voluntarily reviewed after receiving a free copy courtesy of NetGalley, the Publisher, Mariner Books, and the author, Luma Mufleh .

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    Fascinating book by an exceptional woman. I requested this book because I knew about Fugees from friend of the author. We all went to the same college but I don't think Luma and I ever met. What I didn't know is that Luma had gone on to do a Ted Talk and was named CNN Hero of the Year in 2017. Her passion for the education of refugees in America is evident and I love how she gives names and stories to some of her students. I felt invested in them as I learned who they were. She writes so articul Fascinating book by an exceptional woman. I requested this book because I knew about Fugees from friend of the author. We all went to the same college but I don't think Luma and I ever met. What I didn't know is that Luma had gone on to do a Ted Talk and was named CNN Hero of the Year in 2017. Her passion for the education of refugees in America is evident and I love how she gives names and stories to some of her students. I felt invested in them as I learned who they were. She writes so articulately about the educational system in the US, outside of the impact it has on refugees. It's long been an interest of mine and she outlines many of the issues exceptionally well. Savage Inequalities indeed. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in education in the US or anyone who enjoys reading about an ordinary woman who is doing extraordinary things with her life. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy of this book as part of a giveaway! To attempt to change the educational system in America is difficult, but advocating for students by pushing back at the long-accepted standards while you are already a minority is astonishing. When I originally listened to Luma Mufleh's TED talk in a class, I had my eyes and ears opened to the difficulties faced by refugees. I had never really thought about how refugees would be disadvantaged by our education sys Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy of this book as part of a giveaway! To attempt to change the educational system in America is difficult, but advocating for students by pushing back at the long-accepted standards while you are already a minority is astonishing. When I originally listened to Luma Mufleh's TED talk in a class, I had my eyes and ears opened to the difficulties faced by refugees. I had never really thought about how refugees would be disadvantaged by our education system, especially those that don't speak English. Many of these refugees are trying hard to assimilate into an alien country, where many people don't speak the same language and there aren't many people that will dedicate time to help. I first saw this book when I was browsing through some upcoming releases for 2022 and I knew I HAD to read this book. To me, this book is a call out to the American education system to do better for both the teachers and students that are being failed by the currently unequal system. Reading this book in front of my college peers has started discussions on how our education system disproportionally disadvantages students from minority backgrounds or from impoverished communities with less access to educational resources. It has also led to many of them asking me if they can borrow this book from me to read it themselves.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Arp

    I don't even know where to start with my review. I don't know what to say that hasn't been said in other reviews. I just can not recommend this book enough to anyone who is involved in education, refugee services, churches with missions/community outreach programs/refugee programs, parents, students or anyone who wants to understand another person's experience. This is my third book that talks first hand on refugees and their experiences their first few years in America and the same theme repeat I don't even know where to start with my review. I don't know what to say that hasn't been said in other reviews. I just can not recommend this book enough to anyone who is involved in education, refugee services, churches with missions/community outreach programs/refugee programs, parents, students or anyone who wants to understand another person's experience. This is my third book that talks first hand on refugees and their experiences their first few years in America and the same theme repeats itself. We as Americans welcome them in to our country (kind of) and then expect them to just know how to speak the language, understand all the traditions, know all the rules and fit in as soon as they get off the plane. This book is just a stepping stone to how we can start to change things for the better for everyone. If you put this book down and do not want to make life better or easier for someone, I would be surprised. I will be suggesting this book to everyone I know who would benefit and maybe just a few who need to see a perspective outside of their own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth Ursell

    This book brought me back to my days of working in refugee resettlement. Rather than focusing on the challenges that refugee families and children face, which are well outlined in this book, I'd like to focus on a much more important message from the book: we should not fixate on refugees' suffering, our sympathy for them, or on glorifying their struggles, but on what they can actually achieve with the right tools. Worth a read if you want to understand why our current education system doesn't w This book brought me back to my days of working in refugee resettlement. Rather than focusing on the challenges that refugee families and children face, which are well outlined in this book, I'd like to focus on a much more important message from the book: we should not fixate on refugees' suffering, our sympathy for them, or on glorifying their struggles, but on what they can actually achieve with the right tools. Worth a read if you want to understand why our current education system doesn't work for these populations. One thing I appreciate about this author is that she doesn't propose that the solution is that every major city and region with refugees build a school like hers, because she knows that what makes her system special is the hands-on, very customized nature of it. Long-term, I don't know what the solution is in other communities with large refugee populations, but this is a step in the right direction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Belinda Lee

    In Learning America, female, Muslim, gay refugee Luma Mufleh grapples with the systemic inequalities in the American education system. An opportunistic interaction with a group of young refugee boys starts a chain of events that ultimately leads to Luma starting her own schools to cater for the needs of children who have experienced trauma and displacement from their home countries. Told from a place of fierce empathy and compassion, the author describes her own, and individual children's stories In Learning America, female, Muslim, gay refugee Luma Mufleh grapples with the systemic inequalities in the American education system. An opportunistic interaction with a group of young refugee boys starts a chain of events that ultimately leads to Luma starting her own schools to cater for the needs of children who have experienced trauma and displacement from their home countries. Told from a place of fierce empathy and compassion, the author describes her own, and individual children's stories to emphasise the gross inequalities in the public and private school systems, and that a one size fits all approach is rarely useful in education, let alone with the young men and women that she works with. Themes of inequality, privelege, friendship, loyalty and hope are explored in detail, leaving the reader with both a sense of despair for the state of the educational system in the US, and inspiration at the ability of one woman to overcome her own significant trauma to provide a safe place of learning, skill building and love for those children most in need. This book is a must read for educators, those working with marginalised and/or traumatised children, and anyone who cares about the plight of displaced people both around the world, and in their own country. Thank you to Mariner Books for the ARC ( digital via Netgalley) in exchange for an honest review

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susie Dumond

    After leaving her home country of Jordan and coming out as a lesbian, Luma Mufleh was looking for her place to belong in the U.S. When she happened upon a group of refugee kids playing soccer in Georgia, she asked if she could join, and the rest of her life was changed. Mufleh started a soccer team for refugee kids that turned into a family, a non-profit, a school, and so much more. This is a really engaging, thoughtful, and accessible book about one woman's journey to support refugee kids and th After leaving her home country of Jordan and coming out as a lesbian, Luma Mufleh was looking for her place to belong in the U.S. When she happened upon a group of refugee kids playing soccer in Georgia, she asked if she could join, and the rest of her life was changed. Mufleh started a soccer team for refugee kids that turned into a family, a non-profit, a school, and so much more. This is a really engaging, thoughtful, and accessible book about one woman's journey to support refugee kids and their families. It doesn't shy away from the difficult path kids face when they arrive in the U.S. with little or no English skills and limited resources, but it's also full of hope and optimism for a better future. Mufleh's story is enlightening and moving, and I enjoyed every page. Thanks to the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shanna

    I have both read this book and listening to the audio read by the author. It is the story of an inspirational woman, who would never describe herself that way. Her journey to creating an amazing school for refugees is told with humor, humility, and, at times, uncomfortable honesty. Her love of this country, and firm belief that we can, and should, be doing better for students doesn't stop with refugees. All educators would take important lessons from this book and it should be required reading t I have both read this book and listening to the audio read by the author. It is the story of an inspirational woman, who would never describe herself that way. Her journey to creating an amazing school for refugees is told with humor, humility, and, at times, uncomfortable honesty. Her love of this country, and firm belief that we can, and should, be doing better for students doesn't stop with refugees. All educators would take important lessons from this book and it should be required reading to enlighten educators and administrators about the unspoken biases at work in the current system. As they say, I laughed, I cried...but I also left inspired and with a greater understanding of the refugee experience in our schools.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda Morris

    This is an amaziang book and I urge anyone/everyong to read it. I discovered this book when the independent bookstore Politics & Prose hosted a book talk where host Kathleen Kennedy talked with Luma Mufleh, the author of the rexently published book "Learning Aerica: One Woman's Fight for Educational Justice for Refugee Children". BTW, Mufleh is a refugee. I had not planned to purchase the book before this book talk but ordered it the next day from Otto's, Williamsport's independent bookstore. I This is an amaziang book and I urge anyone/everyong to read it. I discovered this book when the independent bookstore Politics & Prose hosted a book talk where host Kathleen Kennedy talked with Luma Mufleh, the author of the rexently published book "Learning Aerica: One Woman's Fight for Educational Justice for Refugee Children". BTW, Mufleh is a refugee. I had not planned to purchase the book before this book talk but ordered it the next day from Otto's, Williamsport's independent bookstore. I also had given little thought about how American schools taught refugee children, many who have not been in school for years, if ever. Amazing and thoughtful - two words among many that I could use to describe this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    I can't name a single book that I've ever learned more from. As an educator of color I have been humbled by Mufleh's words and experiences. I'm forced to face my own biases and I am now better for it. I'm grateful for Mufleh's story; the way she doesn't shy from her mistakes and turns them into lessons for readers, into questions they must ask themselves. Honestly, I'm overwhelmed by too many emotions to name. This book is the inspiration and validation I needed when making my own observations w I can't name a single book that I've ever learned more from. As an educator of color I have been humbled by Mufleh's words and experiences. I'm forced to face my own biases and I am now better for it. I'm grateful for Mufleh's story; the way she doesn't shy from her mistakes and turns them into lessons for readers, into questions they must ask themselves. Honestly, I'm overwhelmed by too many emotions to name. This book is the inspiration and validation I needed when making my own observations within classrooms. I love my students, and I know the many ways that I and the education system fail them. Mufleh gives me hope, and an outline, and a reminder that what I truly love, making those connections, does matter.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Katz

    Thank you goodreads for my copy of this book. One caring, determined person can make a difference and this book is a real example of just how that can happen. The author wanted to help refugee children as so many people do, but she took steps to make that happen. She went so much further than most by learning each child's story. She listened. and she took many unconventional steps to help. One person can not do it all and finding a path to replicate what works make good ideas sustainable. What M Thank you goodreads for my copy of this book. One caring, determined person can make a difference and this book is a real example of just how that can happen. The author wanted to help refugee children as so many people do, but she took steps to make that happen. She went so much further than most by learning each child's story. She listened. and she took many unconventional steps to help. One person can not do it all and finding a path to replicate what works make good ideas sustainable. What Ms Mufleh did in this book would never work in our public school system, but parts of her plan of action would. Now we need to get Everyone to listen.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martha Kuder

    This was a very enlightening read about our nation’s failure to educate young refugees and the author’s accidental journey from becoming a refugee’s soccer coach, to their educator. I am not sure I am capable of mastering another language and can’t imagine how daunting a challenge it is for traumatized families who have made their way into the United States to start a new life. Aggressive hostility toward foreigners, people of color, and those who identify as lgbtq has become a seemingly accepte This was a very enlightening read about our nation’s failure to educate young refugees and the author’s accidental journey from becoming a refugee’s soccer coach, to their educator. I am not sure I am capable of mastering another language and can’t imagine how daunting a challenge it is for traumatized families who have made their way into the United States to start a new life. Aggressive hostility toward foreigners, people of color, and those who identify as lgbtq has become a seemingly accepted way with too many of our nation’s citizens, including “Christian’s”, who have long forgotten kindness and empathy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Luma not only paints a vivid picture of the reality of refugee children adjusting to life in America—including her own personal experiences—but she highlights the reformations needed in education for all children in the United States. This book is a must-read for those desiring to better serve refugee communities, deepen empathy for the plight of refugees—especially of children, and for those seeking to become more culturally responsive to the ever-changing demographics of today's American educa Luma not only paints a vivid picture of the reality of refugee children adjusting to life in America—including her own personal experiences—but she highlights the reformations needed in education for all children in the United States. This book is a must-read for those desiring to better serve refugee communities, deepen empathy for the plight of refugees—especially of children, and for those seeking to become more culturally responsive to the ever-changing demographics of today's American educational system.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Excellent read. Mufleh's story, a gay refugee from Jordan who goes from coaching other refugees’ soccer to running a school for these children, was inspirational and honest. Some of her critical comments about public schools stung a little and were perhaps a little too misinformed, but her heart was in the right place. I especially loved how she evolved from telling her students that college was the only path to success and happiness to realizing that college doesn't equal those things for every Excellent read. Mufleh's story, a gay refugee from Jordan who goes from coaching other refugees’ soccer to running a school for these children, was inspirational and honest. Some of her critical comments about public schools stung a little and were perhaps a little too misinformed, but her heart was in the right place. I especially loved how she evolved from telling her students that college was the only path to success and happiness to realizing that college doesn't equal those things for everyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I listened to this book on audio (read by the author!), and I enjoyed it. She tells the story of her own history as a refugee and the process of starting a school for refugee children in the Atlanta area. While I didn't agree with her on every educational idea and principle, I appreciated the deep passion and conviction she brought to her work. Her description of the inner workings of her school made me want to go there! I listened to this book on audio (read by the author!), and I enjoyed it. She tells the story of her own history as a refugee and the process of starting a school for refugee children in the Atlanta area. While I didn't agree with her on every educational idea and principle, I appreciated the deep passion and conviction she brought to her work. Her description of the inner workings of her school made me want to go there!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Kristick

    Inspiring memoir of woman who founded a school for refugee children that had major accomplishments - bringing non- and minimal-English speaking children up to grade level within a few years. One interesting foundational element of the school was that all students had to play soccer (an international sport that many of the children already know) and learn music (singing and playing instruments has a major impact on learning English).

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob Rogers

    I found this book fascinating! As a white person who had never known an ancestor who was not born in the United States of America, I find myself eriely ignorant in the process of refugees coming to this country. This book explains the disconnect, barriers, and difficulties of incoming refugees. The story of the authors journey to become an advocate is very interesting. I learned a lot about a subject that I feel I should have already known.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I was impressed with how inspiring and eye-opening this book was. I think it's important for everyone to read this as it explores the American education system. While the book was very informative it also describes so many crucial themes that are beneficial to understand and grasp. I believe this is a must read for every educator and it should be popularized more. Thank you to William Morrow and Goodreads for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was impressed with how inspiring and eye-opening this book was. I think it's important for everyone to read this as it explores the American education system. While the book was very informative it also describes so many crucial themes that are beneficial to understand and grasp. I believe this is a must read for every educator and it should be popularized more. Thank you to William Morrow and Goodreads for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Madelyn Miller

    Wowowow. Such great storytelling, and such gripping stories told, both Luma’s and those of her Fugees and their families. Also a ton of really eye-opening insights on America’s education system, and comprehensive constructive thoughts on how to better serve immigrant and refugee students. Really packs a punch in some ~230ish pages. Must read!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Delfina

    Really enjoyed reading this. As a teacher who works with immigrant students, it was deeply inspiring and resonated so much with me. However, I didn’t agree with all of the authors views, particularly about teacher training, performance, and evaluation. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in education & refugee populations!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...