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Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative

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AN INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER Memoir meets craft masterclass in this “daring, honest, psychologically insightful” exploration of how we think and write about intimate experiences—“a must read for anybody shoving a pen across paper or staring into a screen or a past" (Mary Karr). In this bold and exhilarating mix of memoir and master class, Melissa Febos tackles the emotiona AN INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER Memoir meets craft masterclass in this “daring, honest, psychologically insightful” exploration of how we think and write about intimate experiences—“a must read for anybody shoving a pen across paper or staring into a screen or a past" (Mary Karr). In this bold and exhilarating mix of memoir and master class, Melissa Febos tackles the emotional, psychological, and physical work of writing intimately while offering an utterly fresh examination of the storyteller’s life and the questions which run through it. How might we go about capturing on the page the relationships that have formed us? How do we write about our bodies, their desires and traumas? What does it mean for an author’s way of writing, or living, to be dismissed as “navel-gazing”—or else hailed as “so brave, so raw”? And to whom, in the end, do our most intimate stories belong? Drawing on her own path from aspiring writer to acclaimed author and writing professor—via addiction and recovery, sex work and Harvard night school—Melissa Febos has created a captivating guide to the writing life, and a brilliantly unusual exploration of subjectivity, privacy, and the power of divulgence. Candid and inspiring, Body Work will empower readers and writers alike, offering ideas—and occasional notes of caution—to anyone who has ever hoped to see themselves in a story.


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AN INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER Memoir meets craft masterclass in this “daring, honest, psychologically insightful” exploration of how we think and write about intimate experiences—“a must read for anybody shoving a pen across paper or staring into a screen or a past" (Mary Karr). In this bold and exhilarating mix of memoir and master class, Melissa Febos tackles the emotiona AN INSTANT NATIONAL BESTSELLER Memoir meets craft masterclass in this “daring, honest, psychologically insightful” exploration of how we think and write about intimate experiences—“a must read for anybody shoving a pen across paper or staring into a screen or a past" (Mary Karr). In this bold and exhilarating mix of memoir and master class, Melissa Febos tackles the emotional, psychological, and physical work of writing intimately while offering an utterly fresh examination of the storyteller’s life and the questions which run through it. How might we go about capturing on the page the relationships that have formed us? How do we write about our bodies, their desires and traumas? What does it mean for an author’s way of writing, or living, to be dismissed as “navel-gazing”—or else hailed as “so brave, so raw”? And to whom, in the end, do our most intimate stories belong? Drawing on her own path from aspiring writer to acclaimed author and writing professor—via addiction and recovery, sex work and Harvard night school—Melissa Febos has created a captivating guide to the writing life, and a brilliantly unusual exploration of subjectivity, privacy, and the power of divulgence. Candid and inspiring, Body Work will empower readers and writers alike, offering ideas—and occasional notes of caution—to anyone who has ever hoped to see themselves in a story.

30 review for Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A boldly feminist essay collection that explores how autobiographical writing can help one face regrets and trauma and extract meaning from the "pliable material" of memory. "In Praise of Navel Gazing" affirms the importance of women airing their stories of abuse and thereby challenging the power structures that aim to keep victims silent. Febos, a former dominatrix, explains in "Mind Fuck" how she asks her writing students to produce five-sentence sexual histories to force them past familiar tr A boldly feminist essay collection that explores how autobiographical writing can help one face regrets and trauma and extract meaning from the "pliable material" of memory. "In Praise of Navel Gazing" affirms the importance of women airing their stories of abuse and thereby challenging the power structures that aim to keep victims silent. Febos, a former dominatrix, explains in "Mind Fuck" how she asks her writing students to produce five-sentence sexual histories to force them past familiar tropes. "A Big Shitty Party" warns of the dangers of writing about real people; Febos advises readers to take out the specifics - and any cruelty - and to run a draft, if possible, past the people portrayed as main characters. "The Return" employs religious language for the transformation writing can achieve: a change of heart and a confessional attitude are the keys to gaining necessary perspective on an experience. See my full Shelf Awareness review. Posted with permission.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jaylen

    Body Work is an excellent defense of personal narrative and the potential for healing through writing. Febos argues in favor of navel-gazing and confession, and gives advice on how to write better sex and about others. I’m not a writer but I took away a lot as a reader. It reminded me I need to read more memoir (and was fun to think about in relation to autofiction 🙃). Great on audio as well, narrated by Febos!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    My review is up now at 4Columns: https://4columns.org/milks-megan/body... Here's an excerpt: In her new book, Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative, memoirist Melissa Febos handily recuperates the art of writing the self from some of the most common biases against it: that the memoir is a lesser form than the novel. That trauma narratives should somehow be over—we’ve had our fill. That the hard-won wisdom and revelatory insights of the genre (its “confessions”) have been plopped onto My review is up now at 4Columns: https://4columns.org/milks-megan/body... Here's an excerpt: In her new book, Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative, memoirist Melissa Febos handily recuperates the art of writing the self from some of the most common biases against it: that the memoir is a lesser form than the novel. That trauma narratives should somehow be over—we’ve had our fill. That the hard-won wisdom and revelatory insights of the genre (its “confessions”) have been plopped onto the page like raw eggs, uncooked and without seasoning or craft. That personal narrative is necessarily indulgent and narcissistic. That memoirists have gazed so hard at their navels, they’ve buried their heads in their guts. Febos rejects these belittlements with eloquence. To her readers, this will come as no surprise: she has made a career of searching and re-searching the self. ... In its hybridity [as a craft text-memoir], this book formalizes one of Febos’s central tenets within it: that there is no disentangling craft from the personal, just as there is no disentangling the personal from the political. It’s a memoir of a life indelibly changed by literary practice and the rigorous integrity demanded of it: “Transforming my secrets into art has transformed me.” Binding their insights to Febos’s writing life, the four essays in Body Work are, then, as much about her body of work as they are about the art of embodied writing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ella Birt

    This is my first time reading anything by Melissa Febos, and now I’ve vowed to become a Febos completist! Body Work by Melissa Febos offers creative nonfiction essays about the vital importance of writing about trauma in a society that shames people into silence and the transformative internal work that goes along with reclaiming your story. We delve into how to write honestly about sex, how the process can make us more aware of the difference between internalized misogyny and our own truest des This is my first time reading anything by Melissa Febos, and now I’ve vowed to become a Febos completist! Body Work by Melissa Febos offers creative nonfiction essays about the vital importance of writing about trauma in a society that shames people into silence and the transformative internal work that goes along with reclaiming your story. We delve into how to write honestly about sex, how the process can make us more aware of the difference between internalized misogyny and our own truest desires, how to write about other people without destroying them or ourselves in the process, and some of the deeply spiritual aspects of writing. While reading this book, I was also taking an online course in creative nonfiction. As a newbie, I felt frozen, staring at the blank page, questioning whether I could really write about trauma. I wanted to write about sex, queer sex, dissociation, growing up an unusually precocious and sensitive child, the pervasiveness of patriarchal oppression, and I needed to make it compelling and honest and to “excavate events for which I had been numb on the first go-around.” I saw myself in Febos, and seeing her thrive and heal and do so through writing gave me a framework to visualize what I want in my own creative life. Body Work found me at the exact moment I needed it most. One of my favorite essays in Body Work is A Big Shitty Party: Six Parables of Writing About Other People. I feel relieved to have read this essay before publishing anything of note! Febos shared her own mistakes, regrets, and shifts in perspective with such insight that my own immaturity as a writer felt impossible to ignore. I had ideas for essays that had long been brewing that weren’t necessarily cruel nor untrue, but they could sting someone. Febos reminded me, “There are good essays that there are good reasons not to write,” but also, “…a difference in individual truths is not always a conflict. So long as we don’t try to speak for each other, there is room in our house for more than one story.” I’m always looking for books that illuminate the experience of gifted children (a term that’s not always appealing, and yet we don’t have any other highly recognizable terms for intellectually advanced kids and adults), as these children tend to have difficulty seeing themselves reflected in the world. She describes her heightened perceptivity, openness to spiritual experience, early advanced reading and writing abilities: “I wanted to be a writer very young because writer was the only role I could see myself occupying in society, the only one that might hold everything that I was: queer, overly emotional, burdensomely perceptive, reluctant to do any kind of work whose purpose was opaque to me, ravenous in ways that made me an outlier. It was an occupation that seemed to offer respite and relief, but also was connected to the sublime—it offered the gift of self-forgetting, a transcendence on the other side of which lay insight. I did not think to compare this with any description of religious experience, because I had not read any. Now, it seems obvious.” My copy of Body Work is so laden with highlights, it’s impossible to pick out the most profound or exciting quotes. I felt magnetically drawn into the writing world of Febos with each essay. This book is like a course in itself, and I’m sure I’ll read it dozens of times over the next few years both to learn and measure my learning and just to hear the voice of someone who actually gets it…someone who has done the work, knows the work never ends, and sees transformation and art as necessary to one another. I recommend this book to writers of all experience levels, and to anyone who has ever considered telling their own story through memoir. If you consider yourself an intersectional feminist, queer, contemplative, and literary, this book is a dreamscape of inspiration. Thank you, NetGalley, for this ARC!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Enormously wise, generous, lucid, direct, and beautifully written, but so much more than that, this is the book that I have been waiting for, that I never knew that I wanted. The book I wish I had had at the beginning of my career and the book that will empower me still, even as I absorb it in my fifties. I began to understand that I was internalizing the male dominated values and narratives of the writing world over a decade ago but I struggled to free myself from them, as much as I longed too. Enormously wise, generous, lucid, direct, and beautifully written, but so much more than that, this is the book that I have been waiting for, that I never knew that I wanted. The book I wish I had had at the beginning of my career and the book that will empower me still, even as I absorb it in my fifties. I began to understand that I was internalizing the male dominated values and narratives of the writing world over a decade ago but I struggled to free myself from them, as much as I longed too. I have begun, in the last few years, to understand better the ways in which these values hobble all of us, men and women, alike, in telling our stories, but this book has finally freed me, gave me my own tools to dismantle the master's house (Audre Lord). It has given me a capacious (one of my favorite words so I use it often and it's appropriate here) intellectual, emotional and psychological rationale for writing the personal narratives I have always been drawn to, even as I came of age as a writer fifteen years before the author did, when personal narratives were even less valued. But this book does even more than that. It offers perhaps some of the best advice I have ever read on subjects such as: writing about other people, writing about trauma and recovery, writing about sex, all through the lens of the author's life, a lens which she focuses so well here in teaching us these lessons. And what a generous teacher is Melissa Febos, teaching us how to be writers in the world, in relationship, and how to take hold of the reins of our own stories, because they are important, to us and to humanity. Toni Morrison famously said, the function of freedom is to free someone else. This book opens the gates for whoever reads it and so I will be championing it and using it to teach every chance I get. It is just that good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Blum

    I’d give it six stars if I could. Destined to become a go-to volume in my library—an indispensable manual and meditation for all writers, particularly those who write memoir and nonfiction. Manages to provide valuable new insights and revelations within a crowded genre.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bree Hill

    “Sometimes the best way to unlearn something is by simply cultivating defiance toward those unchosen rules.” “We are all ultimately writing about the same four or five things: death, trauma, love, loss, recovery. Mostly death. If sex words have been overused, so have grief words.” Another five star Melissa Febos read. I pretty much read this in one sitting. Her writing is mesmerizing and voice commands your attention and doesn’t let go. So fierce and honest and passionate about craft and storytell “Sometimes the best way to unlearn something is by simply cultivating defiance toward those unchosen rules.” “We are all ultimately writing about the same four or five things: death, trauma, love, loss, recovery. Mostly death. If sex words have been overused, so have grief words.” Another five star Melissa Febos read. I pretty much read this in one sitting. Her writing is mesmerizing and voice commands your attention and doesn’t let go. So fierce and honest and passionate about craft and storytelling. Body Work was another incredible read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathália

    It’s a fact, she can do no wrong.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative by Melissa Febos is a thoughtfully-written collections of essays about writing our own stories. It is very academic and feminist and makes you consider your own experiences and how dominant society and culture color our perspective unless we actively fight against it. Febos ruminates on the craft of writing and about truth with its subjectivity tied to a person’s perspective. Overall, I found this incredibly fascinating and gave me food for thou Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative by Melissa Febos is a thoughtfully-written collections of essays about writing our own stories. It is very academic and feminist and makes you consider your own experiences and how dominant society and culture color our perspective unless we actively fight against it. Febos ruminates on the craft of writing and about truth with its subjectivity tied to a person’s perspective. Overall, I found this incredibly fascinating and gave me food for thought, especially the parts where she goes over the possible ethical concerns about writing about other people and reframing our own stories through introspection. I am not a writer, but was an English major in college and lifelong feminist, so I really enjoyed this book. Thank you Catapult + HighBridge Audio for providing this ebook + audiobook ARC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Laverdiere

    This is must-read material for anyone writing CNF or memoir. Thanks to Melissa, I realize that I must be braver in my own writing. To expose my innermost fears, shames and regrets not only so that I can be free of them but as a service to those who need to read about them. I have highlighted, earmarked and made notes in this book. Sorry to horrify you, but how could I not? I will be reading Body Work again and again. And then once more. I realize I am blubbering, but you really need to read this This is must-read material for anyone writing CNF or memoir. Thanks to Melissa, I realize that I must be braver in my own writing. To expose my innermost fears, shames and regrets not only so that I can be free of them but as a service to those who need to read about them. I have highlighted, earmarked and made notes in this book. Sorry to horrify you, but how could I not? I will be reading Body Work again and again. And then once more. I realize I am blubbering, but you really need to read this book!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    If you love Melissa Febos, you will love this. If you love books on craft, you won't know what hit you –– and you will be a better writer [and person] for it. This book is a permission slip to tell your story, replete with detailed notes from the field. If you love Melissa Febos, you will love this. If you love books on craft, you won't know what hit you –– and you will be a better writer [and person] for it. This book is a permission slip to tell your story, replete with detailed notes from the field.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rennie

    Really good, and some truly sublime ideas, but sometimes a little too academic in areas that weren’t well served by it. I haven’t read her other books but I liked seeing what made her turn to memoir in the first place. She’s much more eloquent about her reasons than most could be, I think, even if the reasons are often very similar.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Iina

    Oh I loved this lots! Within four essays, Melissa Fabos packs a whole lot of information and food for thought about memoirs and writing in general. My copy has become littered with underlined and circled passages, so this is one I will quite likely return to later. (She almost makes me want to write nonfiction now too!) Would absolutely recommend for anyone interested in writing as a craft, for those working on a memoir, or for anyone who enjoyed Carmen Maria Machado's In the Dream House, for wh Oh I loved this lots! Within four essays, Melissa Fabos packs a whole lot of information and food for thought about memoirs and writing in general. My copy has become littered with underlined and circled passages, so this is one I will quite likely return to later. (She almost makes me want to write nonfiction now too!) Would absolutely recommend for anyone interested in writing as a craft, for those working on a memoir, or for anyone who enjoyed Carmen Maria Machado's In the Dream House, for which I think this makes a wonderful pairing. Thank you to Machester University Press for sending me a review copy of this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Melissa Febos' work is deeply, personally autobiographical. Her previous books have concentrated on her experiences and the lessons learned as a pro-domme and drug addict; her exploration of her love relationships; her growing up female. In this new book, she consolidates all and concentrates on her process as a writer. For writers, this is an invaluable tool for self-reflection, giving oneself permission to write your truth, and editing what eventually feels superfluous. There are writing exerci Melissa Febos' work is deeply, personally autobiographical. Her previous books have concentrated on her experiences and the lessons learned as a pro-domme and drug addict; her exploration of her love relationships; her growing up female. In this new book, she consolidates all and concentrates on her process as a writer. For writers, this is an invaluable tool for self-reflection, giving oneself permission to write your truth, and editing what eventually feels superfluous. There are writing exercises offered, and Febos' own personal revelations after her own experiences with them. She writes about her students and teaching in a way that subtly inspires students and teachers alike to expand upon her own ideas. For non-writers, her process from initial idea to finished work is detailed in intricacy but not didactic instruction. The creative process she follows can be applied to many arts- painting, choreography, composing, photography. There is much to be learned from her examples using real-life experiences and and hypothetical examples. Many thanks to the author and Soft Skull/Catapult for the ARC.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A short but interesting look at the writer's life told from a skilled memoirist. Melissa Febos gives advice and tips on writing about personal topics, sharing her own mistakes and methods. I enjoyed this book for the most part but there was a lot about her former life as a sex worker and I was more into the bits about writing and balancing being too personal or sharing details that involve other people's lives. Good on audio read by the author. A short but interesting look at the writer's life told from a skilled memoirist. Melissa Febos gives advice and tips on writing about personal topics, sharing her own mistakes and methods. I enjoyed this book for the most part but there was a lot about her former life as a sex worker and I was more into the bits about writing and balancing being too personal or sharing details that involve other people's lives. Good on audio read by the author.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Louden

    Best book I've ever read on personal narrative Best book I've ever read on personal narrative

  17. 5 out of 5

    kait

    a book about my favourite types of books: essay, feminist, memoir, and the writing life. it is a bit esoteric but the scope gets broader (and more relatable for me) during the personal parts. the writing was very good. i liked the first essay the best: “in defence of navel-gazing”.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lathram

    This book left me wanting to continue the process of analyzing and airing my own stories through writing. It borrows from autoethnographic methodologies, moving between “I” and “we”, even if she uses different words to explain that hinge. She explores the ethics of writing, who might be harmed by writing about yourself, and navigating multiple truths. I’m inspired by her dedication to writing without publishing; the art before it is seen. Some of Febos’ critics name her work as ego-centric, but This book left me wanting to continue the process of analyzing and airing my own stories through writing. It borrows from autoethnographic methodologies, moving between “I” and “we”, even if she uses different words to explain that hinge. She explores the ethics of writing, who might be harmed by writing about yourself, and navigating multiple truths. I’m inspired by her dedication to writing without publishing; the art before it is seen. Some of Febos’ critics name her work as ego-centric, but what is more of an ego death than publicly turning towards past and present versions of yourself with reflective lenses? If we hope for a different world, we must hope for a different Self. I am curious to think more about this work in conversation with scholar Eve Tuck’s “Suspending Damage: A Letter to Communities,” (2009). What is the exploitation of trauma, what is publicly processing, what is collective grief and grievance…

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    So affirming for not only writers of creative nonfic/personal narrative but anyone who has ever felt FEELINGS (particularly shame)! Or experienced trauma. It's as much about craft as it is about processing the events of your one precious life (not even saying that facetiously. I mean it!). So affirming for not only writers of creative nonfic/personal narrative but anyone who has ever felt FEELINGS (particularly shame)! Or experienced trauma. It's as much about craft as it is about processing the events of your one precious life (not even saying that facetiously. I mean it!).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    Excellent read!! The chapter on writing about sex should be required reading for fiction classes. Can definitely see myself returning to this over and over again.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rose Peterson

    This book is necessary for writers. I loved so much about it that I couldn't keep myself from continually reading passages aloud to my friend on our recent road trip. The first and last essays were my favorites (I loved the link between "beggin-ass songs" and hymns, and I'm forever grateful for the introduction to this Rilke quote: "The work of the eyes is done. Go now and do the heart-work on the images imprisoned within you.") but the middle essays are still good, just geared more toward publi This book is necessary for writers. I loved so much about it that I couldn't keep myself from continually reading passages aloud to my friend on our recent road trip. The first and last essays were my favorites (I loved the link between "beggin-ass songs" and hymns, and I'm forever grateful for the introduction to this Rilke quote: "The work of the eyes is done. Go now and do the heart-work on the images imprisoned within you.") but the middle essays are still good, just geared more toward publishing writers.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leah Rachel von Essen

    In Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative, memoirist Melissa Febos writes about the craft of writing about your own experiences and traumas. It's a fantastic primer for personal essay and memoir by Febos, who is the author of Whip Smart and Abandon Me, and is an associate professor in the nonfiction writing program at the University of Iowa. The first thing Febos does is make sure we're all clear: the disdain for 'personal writing' and navel-gazing is only targeted at women and other In Body Work: The Radical Power of Personal Narrative, memoirist Melissa Febos writes about the craft of writing about your own experiences and traumas. It's a fantastic primer for personal essay and memoir by Febos, who is the author of Whip Smart and Abandon Me, and is an associate professor in the nonfiction writing program at the University of Iowa. The first thing Febos does is make sure we're all clear: the disdain for 'personal writing' and navel-gazing is only targeted at women and other marginalized people whose experiences and stories will be evidence, will forge change, will heal. Plus, writing about yourself is not simply publishing your diary—it is much harder than that. It is writing towards a confession, towards new knowledge about yourself and your experiences, it is doing hard work to get at a truth you might not know is under there. Febos gives her own personal tales and tips about writing about real people, how best to approach it legally and also emotionally, how to do it with respect and when she's regretted how she went about it. She also gifts us with a fantastic essay about writing sex scenes—how to write good ones, bad ones, revealing ones. The book as a whole is an excellent book about writing, with excellent tips, both practical and philosophical, about how to approach writing about your own self, experience, memory, trauma. A really great addition to my shelf of books about writing. Content warnings for sexism, sexual violence.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sierra

    Meliss Febos hits it out of the park again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessie Pants

    DEVOURED in an afternoon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chauna Craig

    I consumed this in a day and know I'll need to re-read it more slowly to absorb all the wisdom here. I recommended Febos' Girlhood to a student who said it changed her life. Now she's in a writing class where the (male) instructor said "I'm a feminist, but no one wants to read feminist writing." So I'll be passing this along as an antidote to that garbage. Febos reminds us how "the resistance to memoirs about trauma is always in part--and often nothing but--a resistance to movements for social j I consumed this in a day and know I'll need to re-read it more slowly to absorb all the wisdom here. I recommended Febos' Girlhood to a student who said it changed her life. Now she's in a writing class where the (male) instructor said "I'm a feminist, but no one wants to read feminist writing." So I'll be passing this along as an antidote to that garbage. Febos reminds us how "the resistance to memoirs about trauma is always in part--and often nothing but--a resistance to movements for social justice." And the chapter on writing better sex is so affirming, inspiring, and smart. Like the whole book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Niko

    I thought I would absolutely love this book and was so excited to read it. There are some good tidbits in it, but I felt like a lot of it was filler. I was pretty bored with it. Sometimes I really didn't know what point she was making and I think all 4 chapters could have been 10 pages or less, and would have worked better. Honestly I wouldn't recommend this to other writers unless they were of a particular niche, and even then, there are better craft books out there. I was left unsatisfied. Sor I thought I would absolutely love this book and was so excited to read it. There are some good tidbits in it, but I felt like a lot of it was filler. I was pretty bored with it. Sometimes I really didn't know what point she was making and I think all 4 chapters could have been 10 pages or less, and would have worked better. Honestly I wouldn't recommend this to other writers unless they were of a particular niche, and even then, there are better craft books out there. I was left unsatisfied. Sorry to be the first meh review but it is what it is.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jumi Bello

    Never again will I berate myself for navel gazing. In fact, there may not be a navel left to begin with, given my experience reading this---this book gutted me. I was enamored with its radical vulnerability, where the prose is written in such a way that it gives me permission to wield the same kind of strength that Febos hones through the descriptions inherent to her prose.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Melissa Febos is a national feminist treasure. If ever there were a book that every woman should read, it's this one. I am struggling to reconcile how any body of work could possibly be THIS obvious and THIS revelatory. I'm dumbfounded. I'm jealous. I'm infatuated. All the stars. Every. Single. One. PS - Best footnotes ever. Don't miss them. Melissa Febos is a national feminist treasure. If ever there were a book that every woman should read, it's this one. I am struggling to reconcile how any body of work could possibly be THIS obvious and THIS revelatory. I'm dumbfounded. I'm jealous. I'm infatuated. All the stars. Every. Single. One. PS - Best footnotes ever. Don't miss them.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bennett

    read it in a day, breathless

  30. 4 out of 5

    K

    Not as profound as I was hoping for, but I will read more of her work.

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