Hot Best Seller

Isla to Island

Availability: Ready to download

This stunning wordless graphic novel follows a young girl in the 1960s who immigrates from Cuba to the United States and must redefine what home means to her. Marisol loves her colorful island home. Cuba is vibrant with flowers and food and people…but things are changing. The home Marisol loves is no longer safe—and then it’s no longer her home at all. Her parents are sendi This stunning wordless graphic novel follows a young girl in the 1960s who immigrates from Cuba to the United States and must redefine what home means to her. Marisol loves her colorful island home. Cuba is vibrant with flowers and food and people…but things are changing. The home Marisol loves is no longer safe—and then it’s no longer her home at all. Her parents are sending her to the United States. Alone. Nothing about Marisol’s new life in cold, gray Brooklyn feels like home—not the language, school, or even her foster parents. But Marisol starts to realize that home isn’t always a place. And finding her way can be as simple as staying true to herself.


Compare

This stunning wordless graphic novel follows a young girl in the 1960s who immigrates from Cuba to the United States and must redefine what home means to her. Marisol loves her colorful island home. Cuba is vibrant with flowers and food and people…but things are changing. The home Marisol loves is no longer safe—and then it’s no longer her home at all. Her parents are sendi This stunning wordless graphic novel follows a young girl in the 1960s who immigrates from Cuba to the United States and must redefine what home means to her. Marisol loves her colorful island home. Cuba is vibrant with flowers and food and people…but things are changing. The home Marisol loves is no longer safe—and then it’s no longer her home at all. Her parents are sending her to the United States. Alone. Nothing about Marisol’s new life in cold, gray Brooklyn feels like home—not the language, school, or even her foster parents. But Marisol starts to realize that home isn’t always a place. And finding her way can be as simple as staying true to herself.

30 review for Isla to Island

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I read this mostly wordless graphic novel in one sitting. The words that were included are a combination of Spanish and English. This is a touching and powerful immigrant story, in this case a story about a child. The reader gets a great sense of the immigrant experience of this child sent off on her own. I love how books and nature, and kindness from her foster parents and a librarian, ease her difficult adjustment. It’s a lovely coming of age story. There is a brilliant use of color. I’ve neve I read this mostly wordless graphic novel in one sitting. The words that were included are a combination of Spanish and English. This is a touching and powerful immigrant story, in this case a story about a child. The reader gets a great sense of the immigrant experience of this child sent off on her own. I love how books and nature, and kindness from her foster parents and a librarian, ease her difficult adjustment. It’s a lovely coming of age story. There is a brilliant use of color. I’ve never seen color (and lack of color) done better in a picture book/graphic novel. The pictures are wonderful and manage to tell a complex story. Notes in the back of the book, with non-fiction information, made the fictional (based on truth) story all the more compelling. Acknowledgments; Operation Peter Pan; Author’s Note; and a short list of further reading. Great book! I loved it. 4-1/2 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    This was so beautifully done. Isla to Island is a middle grade graphic novel that chronicles Marisol's journey having to move from Cuba to the United States during Operation Peter Pan. After Castro assumes control of the island, Marisol's parents make the decision to use a Catholic relief fund to send her to a foster family in Brooklyn, NY. Readers follow Marisol as she struggles adapting to her new surroundings and feeling any sense of belonging in this new, scary place. Honestly, it's the artw This was so beautifully done. Isla to Island is a middle grade graphic novel that chronicles Marisol's journey having to move from Cuba to the United States during Operation Peter Pan. After Castro assumes control of the island, Marisol's parents make the decision to use a Catholic relief fund to send her to a foster family in Brooklyn, NY. Readers follow Marisol as she struggles adapting to her new surroundings and feeling any sense of belonging in this new, scary place. Honestly, it's the artwork that makes the story. The entire graphic novel is wordless pushing readers to really study the artwork to understand the emotions felt my Marisol, her parents, and her new caregivers. While everything that takes place in Cuba is colorful, the scenes in Brooklyn are grayscale truly reiterating the emotional complexity that lies with having to make such a huge adjustment. There is a catalyst to the color change, but I'll leave that for readers to discover. It definitely was an element that I enjoyed. Overall, this was a great read and Castellanos does a great job providing readers with more resources at the end of the graphic novel for those that want to learn more about Operation Peter Pan.

  3. 5 out of 5

    aarya

    Beautifully illustrated, moving, and wordless graphic novel about a young girl sent to live with foster parents in New York after the Cuban Revolution. Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoraida

    Beautiful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    In the shadow of the Cuban Revolution, Marisol Alabarce's parents send her off to live with a foster family in Brooklyn, New York. Frightened and angry and isolated by language, culture, and prejudice, all the color is literally leached out of Marisol's life, with only flowers and books offering the occasional flare of hope that she'll somehow find her way in this new and unwelcome world. The story is very effectively told with a minimum of words -- heard only in the occasional burst from a radio In the shadow of the Cuban Revolution, Marisol Alabarce's parents send her off to live with a foster family in Brooklyn, New York. Frightened and angry and isolated by language, culture, and prejudice, all the color is literally leached out of Marisol's life, with only flowers and books offering the occasional flare of hope that she'll somehow find her way in this new and unwelcome world. The story is very effectively told with a minimum of words -- heard only in the occasional burst from a radio or seen on signs, newspapers, and books. It helps show the separation Marisol is feeling in a country whose language she doesn't speak, and the art is strong enough to carry the load of showing all the emotion she is feeling. It's deceptively simple, but tremendously moving, and unfortunately too timely with the Ukrainian war creating millions of refugees right now.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    For Marisol, life in Havana was full of family, color, love, school, and flowers until the revolution. Batista is gone and Fidel Castro is in power bringing chaos, guns, violence, indoctrination, scarcity, and hunger. As part of Operation Pedro Pan, her parents send Marisol to New York City where life is gray, sad, lonely, cold, snowy, and with an incomprehensible language. She lives with an older couple in Brooklyn. School is daunting. She is teased. When she discovers books with pictures of tr For Marisol, life in Havana was full of family, color, love, school, and flowers until the revolution. Batista is gone and Fidel Castro is in power bringing chaos, guns, violence, indoctrination, scarcity, and hunger. As part of Operation Pedro Pan, her parents send Marisol to New York City where life is gray, sad, lonely, cold, snowy, and with an incomprehensible language. She lives with an older couple in Brooklyn. School is daunting. She is teased. When she discovers books with pictures of trees and blooms, colors start to return and her life begins to blossom. The wordless graphic novel effectively conveys a fictional experience based on the author’s family of one of 14,000 children who were sent to the United States from 1960 to 1962 until the Bay of Pigs suspended the airline flights. Many parents saw this as “a chance to give the family safety security, opportunity, a future.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ness (Vynexa)

    I never thought a graphic novel with no dialogue or any typed out internal monologue would make me as emotional as Isla to Island did. As a 1st Generation Cuban-American who was raised in Miami, I always heard the stories of my family and their friend's stories about having to send their children to the United States or being unable to fly out of Cuba to come here, of the struggles they went through and still struggle with today. Seeing the story of a young girl who was sent off alone to the Unite I never thought a graphic novel with no dialogue or any typed out internal monologue would make me as emotional as Isla to Island did. As a 1st Generation Cuban-American who was raised in Miami, I always heard the stories of my family and their friend's stories about having to send their children to the United States or being unable to fly out of Cuba to come here, of the struggles they went through and still struggle with today. Seeing the story of a young girl who was sent off alone to the United States to be with strangers, being in a country where the language and culture is foreign and being in a school with no friends was very painful. While this is a fictional story, it was inspired by very true events. The author, Alexis, makes a very good point in her author's note that Marisol's experience is just one. So many immigrants, specifically Mexicans, come alone as children and have no help. They are sent to this country alone or to be with a stranger with the high chance that they will be deported or be placed in deportation camps. They don't have the same opportunities that many Cuban children had during the Operation Peter Pan. No single immigration story applies to all immigrant. Another thing I loved about this story told in illustrations is how Marisol found home in books. Seemingly, she taught herself English through reading books, found comfort and beauty in novels and books about nature when she couldn't find it during the winter months in New York. As a reader, that resonates so much with me, because I tend to do the same. I think anyone can pick this up and enjoy it, but I know it won't have the same effect on others like it had on me. The art is also stunning and breath taking. The way Alexis uses colors to express and show emotions and feelings is something I appreciate and admire. There were so many instances where I wanted full blown panels as art for my room. I appreciate everything about this graphic novel, especially the list of books to read about Cuba and its history. ⭐️5 STARS⭐️

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    This was a graphic novel about a little girl who lives in Cuba. Because of the violence in Cuba her parents send her to the United States to live. She arrives in New York without knowing how to speak English. Gradually over time she is able to communicate and find things that remind her of Cuba. At the end of the book it shows pictures of her in the future and she has adjusted well to the United States and is very happy. The book is mostly in black-and-white but some pictures are in color. I thi This was a graphic novel about a little girl who lives in Cuba. Because of the violence in Cuba her parents send her to the United States to live. She arrives in New York without knowing how to speak English. Gradually over time she is able to communicate and find things that remind her of Cuba. At the end of the book it shows pictures of her in the future and she has adjusted well to the United States and is very happy. The book is mostly in black-and-white but some pictures are in color. I think the pictures in color are things that she likes and things that make her happy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ilse O'Brien

    A nearly wordless graphic novel about a girl who is sent away from her home and family in Cuba during the political turmoil of the early 1960s to live with foster parents. She finds solace in books and the library, which help her learn English. The choice to keep the novel wordless, as well as the shifts between color and black and white illustrations, highlight Marisol’s experiences and emotions. I hadn’t known about operation Peter Pan, which helped 14,000 children leave Cuba to live in the Un A nearly wordless graphic novel about a girl who is sent away from her home and family in Cuba during the political turmoil of the early 1960s to live with foster parents. She finds solace in books and the library, which help her learn English. The choice to keep the novel wordless, as well as the shifts between color and black and white illustrations, highlight Marisol’s experiences and emotions. I hadn’t known about operation Peter Pan, which helped 14,000 children leave Cuba to live in the United States. A detailed author’s note says it was the largest exodus of children of the 20th century. (The evacuation of hundreds of thousands of children from London was larger in scale, but most of them remained in England.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josie

    I'm new to reading graphic novels and was at first skeptical on how a story can only be told with pictures, but this book changed my perspective on narrative and the various ways stories can be told and felt. I love how the artist used color as a "character", in the main character's homeland of Cuba everything is vibrant and colorful and when she moves to Ney York you see and feel a sharp difference in the color palette and mood. As she gets more comfortable with her surroundings the color from I'm new to reading graphic novels and was at first skeptical on how a story can only be told with pictures, but this book changed my perspective on narrative and the various ways stories can be told and felt. I love how the artist used color as a "character", in the main character's homeland of Cuba everything is vibrant and colorful and when she moves to Ney York you see and feel a sharp difference in the color palette and mood. As she gets more comfortable with her surroundings the color from her home doesn't come back, but the grays become less harsh. As the story progresses what once was gray and scary is now black and white, open for possibilities. The main character is always home sick, but learns to create a home for herself, reflected in her space and how she interacts in everyday life. I love how the color she sees in America comes from books and that is how she learns to connect with her new home. It is heartwarming to see her new family take her in and grow together over time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bookbringer

    AMAZING! A new favorite!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    An absolutely beautiful book, both visually stunning and emotionally touching. It's a classic story of immigration, but told in an evocative way that uses color to accentuate meaning. Both locations - the island of Cuba and Long Island's Brooklyn borough - are shown in great, personal detail. Neither are romanticized - the hardships of each are shown in full force, without dialogue, but there are also moments of colorful beauty, beloved things in the eyes of young Marisol. A very lovely book. An absolutely beautiful book, both visually stunning and emotionally touching. It's a classic story of immigration, but told in an evocative way that uses color to accentuate meaning. Both locations - the island of Cuba and Long Island's Brooklyn borough - are shown in great, personal detail. Neither are romanticized - the hardships of each are shown in full force, without dialogue, but there are also moments of colorful beauty, beloved things in the eyes of young Marisol. A very lovely book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caylie Ratzlaff

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the eARC of this Graphic Novel. 4/5 stars. First of all, this is wordless. There are no dialogue boxes. The art is stunning. Since there is no dialogue, it truly is a quick read; however, it does require processing. It almost is simply viewing the art of the story and thinking about how the pictures depict Marisol's different experiences. I think this would pair well with primary sources from Pedro Pan (sending Cuban children during the 1950s to the US) Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the eARC of this Graphic Novel. 4/5 stars. First of all, this is wordless. There are no dialogue boxes. The art is stunning. Since there is no dialogue, it truly is a quick read; however, it does require processing. It almost is simply viewing the art of the story and thinking about how the pictures depict Marisol's different experiences. I think this would pair well with primary sources from Pedro Pan (sending Cuban children during the 1950s to the US) as a reference material, as I can see younger grades struggling to comprehend the intense emotional elements of Marisol's story. I also love the art and the colors, and how the colors build into the story. Fading from bright and colorful in Cuba to a greyscale until Marisol rediscovers plants and botany and begins to adjust to living in NYC. I also like during the greyscale portion how red is the color of her flower and it slowly becomes more and more colorful. I probably should have read (read?) this slower, but the eARC was a flat lay of it, so it didn't ease itself to reading; however, I really liked it!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    This was such a heartfelt middle grade wordless graphic novel about a young Cuban girl's experience immigrating to America on her own during the Cuban revolution in the 60s. Marisol has to adjust to life in New York City, not speaking English, dealing with culture shock and missing her family back in Cuba. The author does such a great job illustrating the loneliness and longing Marisol feels and how the kindness of her foster family helps open her up to the possibilities of her new life. Highly This was such a heartfelt middle grade wordless graphic novel about a young Cuban girl's experience immigrating to America on her own during the Cuban revolution in the 60s. Marisol has to adjust to life in New York City, not speaking English, dealing with culture shock and missing her family back in Cuba. The author does such a great job illustrating the loneliness and longing Marisol feels and how the kindness of her foster family helps open her up to the possibilities of her new life. Highly recommended with a moving author's note included at the end! While this was based on the author's family's experiences, I found it highly relatable and an important reminder of how hard it can be for new immigrants and how far a little bit of kindness and understanding can go.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cat Gemkow

    So rarely do you see wordless picture books, let alone a wordless graphic novel, but this takes the cake. As a refugee transplant from Havana to Brooklyn, Marisol is thrust into a world where she knows no one, and struggles with communicating with her new host family and the kids at school. Throughout the story, she gains confidence and grows to find her place in her new city, and finds common ground with her host family. This book is incredibly well done and a very timely portrait of the resour So rarely do you see wordless picture books, let alone a wordless graphic novel, but this takes the cake. As a refugee transplant from Havana to Brooklyn, Marisol is thrust into a world where she knows no one, and struggles with communicating with her new host family and the kids at school. Throughout the story, she gains confidence and grows to find her place in her new city, and finds common ground with her host family. This book is incredibly well done and a very timely portrait of the resources we need to help refugee and immigrant children who have been separated from their families. There is even an afterword that explains the program that Marisol participated in during the 1960s getting kids out of Cuba before/during the revolution, which was fascinating and heart wrenching. All in all, this is an amazing, deeply touching graphic novel appropriate for ages 10 and up

  16. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    This is a beautifully illustrated graphic novel with minimal words on the page. Ila is a young girl who is sent to live in the United States due to the violence going on in Cuba. She does not speak the language feels completely lost. Over time she starts to find things around her that remind her of home which allow her to open up.

  17. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    So I already knew I'd love Castellanos' style of illustrations. But seeing a whole story together, renewed my sense of awe. Castellanos balances stunning and meaningful color work with attention to detail. There are close up panels that may lack words - the entire graphic novel has very few words - but they make a startling impact. From a technical stand point alone, Isla to Island is a stunning graphic novel. However the story is also emotional about having to leave our home. full review: https: So I already knew I'd love Castellanos' style of illustrations. But seeing a whole story together, renewed my sense of awe. Castellanos balances stunning and meaningful color work with attention to detail. There are close up panels that may lack words - the entire graphic novel has very few words - but they make a startling impact. From a technical stand point alone, Isla to Island is a stunning graphic novel. However the story is also emotional about having to leave our home. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emperor Katie

    I appreciate how well this graphic novel showed things without any dialogue or words. The art in it was beautiful and more detailed than I typically see in graphic novels. I enjoyed it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this mostly wordless graphic novel, we meet Isla's parents, who marry in 1945 and are living in Cuba. When Isla comes along, the family is closely knit. They go to parks together and press flowers when they return home, and seem to have a good life. In 1960, after Batista and Castro, their neighborhood becomes dangerous. A window in Isla's room is shattered, and the family is scared. The parents decide to send Isla to New York City with Operation Pedro Pan. Isl E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this mostly wordless graphic novel, we meet Isla's parents, who marry in 1945 and are living in Cuba. When Isla comes along, the family is closely knit. They go to parks together and press flowers when they return home, and seem to have a good life. In 1960, after Batista and Castro, their neighborhood becomes dangerous. A window in Isla's room is shattered, and the family is scared. The parents decide to send Isla to New York City with Operation Pedro Pan. Isla arrives to the US alone, but is fostered by a very caring and concerned older couple who do what they can to make her comfortable, but who find it hard to discern exactly what she needs. Isla goes to a Catholic school where many of the children are mean to her, and she struggles with learning, since her command of English isn't good. Her world is portrayed as predominately gray. She eventually discovers books, and through these shares with her foster parents her love of plants and flowers, and color slowly returns to her world. Her foster parents take her to parks and greenhouses, school becomes a bit easier, and she gains enough confidence to make friends. A series of snapshots show her life after her school years when she is able to reunite with her parents and have a family of her own. Strengths: This was a very beautifully done graphic novel that managed to convey a huge amount of information with very few words. There are some song lyrics, signs, and labels on pictures. Isla's emotions are deftly conveyed through facial expressions and body language, and the device of having her arrival in the US be portrayed in black and white, with just the red flower in her hair put there by her father was very powerful. The frustration she feels, and the frustration her foster parents feel in not being able to help her more is palpable, and it was a huge relief when she discovered books and was able to feel more comfortable in her new home. This was a fascinating look at one Pedro Pan experience, and done in a particularly effective way. Weaknesses: Operation Pedro Pan is such an interesting historical event that readers may find themselves wanting more details. It's amazing the details that are conveyed, and there is a selected reading list and some explanation at the end, but many readers will want to investigate some further resources. What I really think: This would be a bold but not unwarranted choice for the 2022 Newbery Award. I will buy a copy, especially for our English Language Learners.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cierra Hypolite-Courville

    Have you ever read a wordless graphic novel? 🌺 If not, I highly recommend starting with this one! This gorgeous, heartfelt novel follows Marisol, a young Cuban girl who has to immigrate to New York on her own during the Cuban Revolution. Despite her foster parents’ warm welcome, Marisol’s transition to Brooklyn is lonely and rough. She misses her parents, the familiarity of the sounds of Cuba, and the warm weather. As time passes, Marisol opens up to her foster parents and finds things that brin Have you ever read a wordless graphic novel? 🌺 If not, I highly recommend starting with this one! This gorgeous, heartfelt novel follows Marisol, a young Cuban girl who has to immigrate to New York on her own during the Cuban Revolution. Despite her foster parents’ warm welcome, Marisol’s transition to Brooklyn is lonely and rough. She misses her parents, the familiarity of the sounds of Cuba, and the warm weather. As time passes, Marisol opens up to her foster parents and finds things that bring her joy. My favorite thing about this book is the way that Castellanos uses color to convey Marisol’s emotions. We see her world turn to gray as she immigrates to Brooklyn and slowly regains color as she reclaims her happiness. The author’s inserts with information about Operation Peter Pan made this book all the more touching. Teacher note: I believe this would pair perfectly with Cuba in my Pocket by Adrianna Cuevas. I would love to do a novel study where we read Cuba in my Pocket and talk about symbolism and theme, then follow up with Isla to Island and discuss tone and mood.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Piyali

    This graphic novel hardly has any words in it. The gorgeous illustration tells the story of young Marisol who has to leave her beautiful and vibrant island, Cuba, to flee the violence after the Cuban revolution. She is one of the thousands of children who emigrated to US without her parents to live with foster parents under Operation Peter Pan. At first, Marisol is miserable. The expressions on Marisol's face when kids at school torment her make it abundantly clear how sad Marisol is, how despon This graphic novel hardly has any words in it. The gorgeous illustration tells the story of young Marisol who has to leave her beautiful and vibrant island, Cuba, to flee the violence after the Cuban revolution. She is one of the thousands of children who emigrated to US without her parents to live with foster parents under Operation Peter Pan. At first, Marisol is miserable. The expressions on Marisol's face when kids at school torment her make it abundantly clear how sad Marisol is, how despondent. No words are needed to convey to the readers her sadness. But salvation comes in form of her foster parents' love and books. Both help Marisol feel less alone. In the author's note, Alexis Castellanos writes about a brief overview of the Cuban revolution in 1959 and also some information about Operation Peter Pan which gave some children a new lease on life and unfortunately failed some children too in its quest to do good. A beautiful read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This is a lovely children's graphic novel about a young girl, Marisol, who becomes part of "Operation Pan Pedro" (Operation Peter Pan). This was a program to get children out of Cuba, and protect them political upheaval, between 1960-62. With the graphic novel format you can see, and feel, her frustration at attending a new school while not understanding English. The illustrations start out in color but become black, white and gray when Marisol lands in NYC and is introduced to her sponsor family This is a lovely children's graphic novel about a young girl, Marisol, who becomes part of "Operation Pan Pedro" (Operation Peter Pan). This was a program to get children out of Cuba, and protect them political upheaval, between 1960-62. With the graphic novel format you can see, and feel, her frustration at attending a new school while not understanding English. The illustrations start out in color but become black, white and gray when Marisol lands in NYC and is introduced to her sponsor family. Eventually, color comes back into Marisol's life through her love of books and plants, and the love of her sponsor family. This is a good book - take a look!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This graphic novel is a stunning wordless look at the life of a cuban girl in the 60s that has to leave her homeland behind to start a new life in a new country without her family and has difficulty adjusting. Then one day Marisol goes to her school library and finds books on plants and it reminds her of the beautiful land of Cuba. She finds her love of botany through this and her librarian gives her a cookbook on cuban meals too. Marisol begins cooking her traditional foods with the people she This graphic novel is a stunning wordless look at the life of a cuban girl in the 60s that has to leave her homeland behind to start a new life in a new country without her family and has difficulty adjusting. Then one day Marisol goes to her school library and finds books on plants and it reminds her of the beautiful land of Cuba. She finds her love of botany through this and her librarian gives her a cookbook on cuban meals too. Marisol begins cooking her traditional foods with the people she is staying with, and she begins to feel happy again! Very sweet story!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fele-cia

    Received an advanced readers copy and glad I did. It’s a colorful graphic novel of the love for one’s family and learning to love a new home. I love the blend of history and imagination. Beautifully drawn and I appreciate the book list at the end to learn more about the history the author touches on.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    Fine? It's ok. I really don't like the art style at all, so that was a big barrier for me. I also get why it's almost entirely wordless, but that also just isn't for me. I hope kids find it and read it, and at the very least it's a super quick read. This was Cat's rec for Liz in round 1 of our Grumps Graphic Novel Roulette! I can't wait for round 2! Fine? It's ok. I really don't like the art style at all, so that was a big barrier for me. I also get why it's almost entirely wordless, but that also just isn't for me. I hope kids find it and read it, and at the very least it's a super quick read. This was Cat's rec for Liz in round 1 of our Grumps Graphic Novel Roulette! I can't wait for round 2!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    This was a wonderful wordless graphic novel. It taught me about the Peter Pan children, I had never heard or knew about them till this book. I guess I have a lot to learn about the history of Cuba and the United States. I like that the book was wordless because I think it helps the reader get in the mind Marisol when coming to America and not knowing any English. The readers can understand how she must have felt not knowing English and being in a foreign country.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meliss

    Incredible art and moving story! Definitely has vibes of a modern classic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sage Harlow

    THIS IS SO BEAUTIFUL IM CRYING

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    super cute book all-around! humble book but not too climatic in my opinion. 3/5 stars!

  30. 5 out of 5

    rather_b_reading

    Beautifully illustrated and hopeful graphic novel about project Pedro Pan and one girls love of books and nature. Written in Spanish and English, but mostly just illustrations this is a must read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...