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Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels: The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets

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A graphic novel adaptation of the hit books that inspired the Netflix film! Sherlock Holmes’ brilliant, strong-willed younger sister takes center stage in this delightfully drawn graphic novel based on Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. 14-year-old Enola Holmes wakes on her birthday to discover that her mother has disappeared from the family's country manor, leavi A graphic novel adaptation of the hit books that inspired the Netflix film! Sherlock Holmes’ brilliant, strong-willed younger sister takes center stage in this delightfully drawn graphic novel based on Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. 14-year-old Enola Holmes wakes on her birthday to discover that her mother has disappeared from the family's country manor, leaving only a collection of flowers and a coded message book. With Sherlock and Mycroft determined to ship her off to a boarding school, Enola escapes, displaying a cleverness that even impresses the elder Holmes. But nothing prepares her for what lies ahead…   Book One in the series includes three thrilling mysteries: The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets. At the back of the book, readers can explore a portfolio of pages from Enola's secret notebook!  


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A graphic novel adaptation of the hit books that inspired the Netflix film! Sherlock Holmes’ brilliant, strong-willed younger sister takes center stage in this delightfully drawn graphic novel based on Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. 14-year-old Enola Holmes wakes on her birthday to discover that her mother has disappeared from the family's country manor, leavi A graphic novel adaptation of the hit books that inspired the Netflix film! Sherlock Holmes’ brilliant, strong-willed younger sister takes center stage in this delightfully drawn graphic novel based on Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. 14-year-old Enola Holmes wakes on her birthday to discover that her mother has disappeared from the family's country manor, leaving only a collection of flowers and a coded message book. With Sherlock and Mycroft determined to ship her off to a boarding school, Enola escapes, displaying a cleverness that even impresses the elder Holmes. But nothing prepares her for what lies ahead…   Book One in the series includes three thrilling mysteries: The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets. At the back of the book, readers can explore a portfolio of pages from Enola's secret notebook!  

30 review for Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels: The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets

  1. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    The adventures of Enola Holmes in graphic form. There are three episodes filled with colorful graphics and accompanied by pages from Enola's own notebooks. What has happened to Enola's mother? Clues and codes abound as our heroine scrambles to remain independent. Her costumes are clever and she keeps her brothers on their toes. I found the use of flowers as symbols and clues to be fascinating. A new way for fans of the books and/or series to get more of Enola. Or, perhaps, an introduction to thi The adventures of Enola Holmes in graphic form. There are three episodes filled with colorful graphics and accompanied by pages from Enola's own notebooks. What has happened to Enola's mother? Clues and codes abound as our heroine scrambles to remain independent. Her costumes are clever and she keeps her brothers on their toes. I found the use of flowers as symbols and clues to be fascinating. A new way for fans of the books and/or series to get more of Enola. Or, perhaps, an introduction to this popular fictional character. Thank you to Andrews McMeel and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rosh

    So! Here’s what you need to know first! I haven’t watched ‘Enola Holmes’ on Netflix, I haven’t read any Enola Holmes book before this one, and all I know of ‘Enola Holmes’ is what I saw in the BBC series ‘Sherlock’ starring Benedict Cumberbatch, which isn’t a reliable reference point. I have read every single Sherlock Holmes story, but that doesn’t help much in this case. So this is the perspective of a general reader (and graphic novel lover), not of an Enola Holmes fan-girl. (Just preparing yo So! Here’s what you need to know first! I haven’t watched ‘Enola Holmes’ on Netflix, I haven’t read any Enola Holmes book before this one, and all I know of ‘Enola Holmes’ is what I saw in the BBC series ‘Sherlock’ starring Benedict Cumberbatch, which isn’t a reliable reference point. I have read every single Sherlock Holmes story, but that doesn’t help much in this case. So this is the perspective of a general reader (and graphic novel lover), not of an Enola Holmes fan-girl. (Just preparing you for why the review is so lacking on gush.😛) This book brings together Serena Blasco’s graphical adaptations of the first three Nancy Springer novels featuring Sherlock’s younger sister Enola. Those who have read the original series might know that each of the first six books of the series contains one mystery for Enola to be solved, and at the same time, there is a larger narrative connecting them all and resolved only at the end of the sixth book. Thus, this collection has an incomplete ending in a sense as books 4-6 aren’t part of it. But whatever is covered in the book is enough to hook you. The three stories in this book are: 1. The Case of the Missing Marquess: Enola’s mother disappears without any information whatsoever except for a collection of flowers and a coded message book. What makes it worse is that this happens on Enola’s 14th birthday. In desperation, Enola sends a telegram to her estranged elder brothers, the famous Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. But when they are convinced that their mother has disappeared voluntarily and that Enola needs to go to boarding school to become a “proper lady”, Enola decides to take matters in her own hands and runs off to London to dig deeper. While there, she hears about a missing young viscount and decides to look for him also. 2. The Case of the Left-Handed Lady: Still hiding from Sherlock and Mycroft, Enola has now christened herself as Ivy Meshle, secretary to the fictitious Dr. Ragostin, specialist in finding missing persons. When John Watson walks into Ragostin’s office one day with the intent of hiring the elusive detective to locate Enola, she takes on the case so that she can keep an eye on Sherlock’s moves and hopefully discover more of what happened to her mother. She also looks into a missing teenaged girl coming from a wealthy family, though the police are convinced that she has eloped. 3. The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets: Still hiding from her brothers, Enola walks into a local customer shop hoping to find newer disguises. On her way, she hears of Dr. Watson’s mysterious disappearance. While enquiring about this with Mrs. Watson, Enola discovers a strange bouquet, which her floral expertise tells her indicates bad luck and revenge. Will Enola be able to locate Dr Watson in time? Where the books clicked for me: ❤ The book includes some serious topics within its content, such as women’s suffrage, societal compulsions about ‘proper’ women’s behaviour and appearance, poverty, class discrimination, and so on. ❤ At the end of each of the stories, there are excerpts of Enola’s secret notebook. This makes for an interesting addition as it reveals Enola’s thoughts and modi operandi through her doodles. ❤ The writing style is pretty quick-paced and help the story move further clearly and quickly. ❤ The illustrations are very good, painted in a watercolour-like effect, lending a light-hearted and dreamy quality to the tense subject matter. The main characters (except one key character) are drawn in a way suiting their personalities. I especially loved Sherlock’s and Enola’s upturned noses, thereby uniting them not just as siblings but also as two stubborn individuals who refused to see any way except their own. Where the book didn’t click for me: 💔 As in almost every detective fiction, it is the main detective – Enola in this case – who finds out everything related to the mysteries. While I find this tough to digest even in regular detective stories (one reason I avoid the genre), it is even more unbelievable this time as the highly capable Sherlock Holmes is also part of the narrative. How is it possible that Sherlock has hardly any clue of what’s happening while Enola racks up the solutions and solve the case? 💔 Again, as in almost every detective fiction, clues conveniently present themselves whenever Enola is around. There are too many coincidences to be believable. 💔 I would have preferred a bit of variety in the mysteries. All three dealt with missing persons, and even the overarching mystery is about Enola’s missing mother. Though the resolutions were quite distinct, it still felt a bit repetitive after a while. 💔 The story development is quite abrupt at times. For instance, when Enola first leaves her house, it is only to find her mother. Why then would she abandon that search midway and go looking for another missing boy instead? It seemed silly. 💔 I loved Mark Gatiss’s portrayal of Mycroft in the BBC Sherlock series. According to Watson’s narration in the original Sherlock books, Mycroft is supposed to be tall and portly, similar to Sherlock in appearance though larger in build. So Mycroft’s physical appearance in this book was very, very disappointing to me. All in all, the books were quick, fun, but one-time reads for me. Detective fiction fans or even fans of the Enola Holmes series might enjoy it a lot more. At the same time, the books kept me hooked enough to know what’s going to happen next.. As they are aimed at children/teenagers, they surely fulfil their purpose well for their target readers. 3.5 stars from me. My thanks to Andrews McMeel Publishing and NetGalley for the DRC of “Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels”. This review is voluntary and contains my honest opinion about the book. *********************** Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tamishly

    I am so, so, so glad I recieved an advance reading of this collection from Andrews McMeel Publishing. I find the main character really endearing and quite the person I would love to know anytime. The artstyle. Don't you ever doubt about it when you pick up this graphic novel series. It6 heavenly. What's more? The emotions present in the artwork is phenomenal. The plot focuses on themes like gender discrimination, women judging women harshly and how men see women/young girls as beings who cannot tak I am so, so, so glad I recieved an advance reading of this collection from Andrews McMeel Publishing. I find the main character really endearing and quite the person I would love to know anytime. The artstyle. Don't you ever doubt about it when you pick up this graphic novel series. It6 heavenly. What's more? The emotions present in the artwork is phenomenal. The plot focuses on themes like gender discrimination, women judging women harshly and how men see women/young girls as beings who cannot take their own decisions or perform a task meant for men/boys. I find the plot really well structured and well presented. I find the character development quite distinct and evolving with each book. Go for this series without a doubt. I am still surprised.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pooja Peravali

    After her mother disappears, Enola Holmes runs away from her brothers, the famous Sherlock and Mycroft, and falls into solving mysteries in Victorian London. I have of course seen the promos for the Netflix film Enola Holmes, though I haven’t actually seen it yet. I knew it was based on a series of YA books, but I’d never read them either. So when I saw that there was a graphic novel adaptation on NetGalley, I thought it would a fun introduction. Besides, I like the art. And I continued to like th After her mother disappears, Enola Holmes runs away from her brothers, the famous Sherlock and Mycroft, and falls into solving mysteries in Victorian London. I have of course seen the promos for the Netflix film Enola Holmes, though I haven’t actually seen it yet. I knew it was based on a series of YA books, but I’d never read them either. So when I saw that there was a graphic novel adaptation on NetGalley, I thought it would a fun introduction. Besides, I like the art. And I continued to like the art throughout. It’s all lovely watercolors, lending a softness to the story and the characters that contracts interestingly with the often grim story, and the author has paid attention to detail with the clothing and the surroundings. I also liked how Sherlock and Mycroft were written, as caring brothers who are nevertheless confounded by the idea of a girl with such agency – canon confusion for Sherlock, at the very least. However, I wondered how successfully the stories had been adapted to this format. Each book is short, allotted about sixty pages in graphic novel form, and because of this it felt as though the intricacies of the mysteries as well some emotional heft were left behind. For example, the motive of the villain in the second book is confusingly not really discussed. Enola’s mother’s disappearance, which I know is an overarching mystery in the series, is also often given short shrift. Ultimately, I thought this was a beautifully-illustrated graphic novel that serves as a nice introduction to the series, if not a perfect substitute. Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley. This is my honest and voluntary review. (Now, a digression. YA historical novels from the early 2000s appear to be rather full of a realistic darkness – at least that is the pattern I am noticing! There’s more of an emphasis on the lead’s coming-of-age. In not unwholly unrelated news, I have exceedingly recently gotten my hands on the full series of Caroline Lawrence's The Roman Mysteries, which follow the same trend!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie all_books_great_and_small

    I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels Volume 1 is a fantastic and fun, adventure and mystery series for young and old readers! The illustrations are whimsical and capture the emotions of each character perfectly. Enola has three different mysteries to solve in this book and her missing mother is the first at hand! Enola isn't your typical girl and tries her best to remain independe I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels Volume 1 is a fantastic and fun, adventure and mystery series for young and old readers! The illustrations are whimsical and capture the emotions of each character perfectly. Enola has three different mysteries to solve in this book and her missing mother is the first at hand! Enola isn't your typical girl and tries her best to remain independent and avoid boarding school at all costs. I love her outdlfits throughout this book and she certainly knows how to give her brother's a run for their money. I found the diary pages from Enolas diary so pretty and a great little touch! I can't wait to watch the Netflix series after reading the first 3 novels in this captivating graphic novel!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    This graphic novel was my introduction to Enola Holmes, Sherlock and Mycroft’s younger sister. Enola’s birth was a scandal and she’s not planning on conforming to society’s expectations of women anytime soon. She conducts herself in a fashion most unladylike by refusing to wear the appropriate dress length for her age and, horror of horrors, climbing trees. Her mother’s disappearance on the occasion of her fourteenth birthday brings Enola’s brothers out of the woodwork. Visiting Ferndell Hall fo This graphic novel was my introduction to Enola Holmes, Sherlock and Mycroft’s younger sister. Enola’s birth was a scandal and she’s not planning on conforming to society’s expectations of women anytime soon. She conducts herself in a fashion most unladylike by refusing to wear the appropriate dress length for her age and, horror of horrors, climbing trees. Her mother’s disappearance on the occasion of her fourteenth birthday brings Enola’s brothers out of the woodwork. Visiting Ferndell Hall for the first time in ten years, they quickly determine that the most appropriate course of action is to send Enola to boarding school. This goes against Enola’s sensibilities and those of her currently absent mother, so before she embarks on the very ladylike occupation of learning how to be a “houseplant”, Enola absconds to London. Smart girl, our Enola. Sherlock and Mycroft are clearly products of their time and probably think they have Enola’s best interests at heart. However, their brotherly love leaves a lot to be desired. Leave her be, Mycroft. She is too young and her head is too small for her body. We can’t expect too much of her. Enola is able to use society’s propensity to underestimate women to her advantage, relying on her wits and penchant for disguises to hide in plain sight. Brother Sherlock may be a famous detective but Enola gives him a run for his money in these adaptations of the first three books of Nancy Springer’s The Enola Holmes Mysteries. Enola takes it upon herself to solve The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets. I enjoyed the watercolour illustrations, which felt even more appropriate when I learned that’s the medium Enola’s mother uses. I haven’t met Enola’s mother yet but I love her already. She’s a suffragist who’s schooled her daughter in activities that will be useful, as opposed to those that will facilitate her transformation into a houseplant. Enola’s adaptability and attention to detail are aided by the tools her mother left her, primarily a book on the language of flowers and a handbound notebook full of coded messages. Enola is “alone” spelled backwards. Mum and her love of coded messages. Could it be a coincidence? I loved the clever use of flowers to convey messages and the inclusion of excerpts from Enola’s secret notebook at the end of each case. Enola’s inquiring mind and indomitable spirit made me want to spend more time with her. I look forward to hanging out with Enola as she continues to subvert her allotted position in nineteenth century London in future graphic novel adaptations. I’ve already ordered the first book in Nancy Springer’s series from the library. Thank you so much to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for the opportunity to read this graphic novel. Blog - https://schizanthusnerd.com

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dinnu Reads Books

    I received a copy of this graphic novel through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I like Enola Holmes mysteries and this graphic novel was just the thing for me. It is pretty accurately based on the first three books and is in no way been affected by the movie which is different from the original story, although it’s not in any way a bad thing, as it was in fact quite a good movie! 😊 I enjoyed being back in the start of Enola’s adventures. The art was beautiful and illustrated the charac I received a copy of this graphic novel through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I like Enola Holmes mysteries and this graphic novel was just the thing for me. It is pretty accurately based on the first three books and is in no way been affected by the movie which is different from the original story, although it’s not in any way a bad thing, as it was in fact quite a good movie! 😊 I enjoyed being back in the start of Enola’s adventures. The art was beautiful and illustrated the characters really well. Some of the more nastier details were omitted but overall it was a great retelling of the novels!😊

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bella Azam

    Many thanks to Netgalley and publisher for providing me with ane-arc im exchange for an honest review. I love the netflix's enola holmes so I was thrilled there is a graphic novel adaptation of it and man, this was such a stunning book!. I love the artstyle, the colourfulness and the adventures of enola holmes as she went through her journey. I just love the story and how the artist adapted the story visually so good and they are beautiful to look at Many thanks to Netgalley and publisher for providing me with ane-arc im exchange for an honest review. I love the netflix's enola holmes so I was thrilled there is a graphic novel adaptation of it and man, this was such a stunning book!. I love the artstyle, the colourfulness and the adventures of enola holmes as she went through her journey. I just love the story and how the artist adapted the story visually so good and they are beautiful to look at

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    Charming, whimsical watercolours illustrate the wonderful Enola Holmes’ first three adventures. Her energy and intelligence come through in Serena Blasco’s artwork. Also, this was a fun way to experience this smart young woman’s experiences in London, solving mysteries and handily outwitting her two older brothers Sherlock and Mycroft. I hope Blasco has illustrated Enola's next three adventures, as I’d definitely reread them in comic form. Thank you to Netgalley and to Andrews McMeel Publishing f Charming, whimsical watercolours illustrate the wonderful Enola Holmes’ first three adventures. Her energy and intelligence come through in Serena Blasco’s artwork. Also, this was a fun way to experience this smart young woman’s experiences in London, solving mysteries and handily outwitting her two older brothers Sherlock and Mycroft. I hope Blasco has illustrated Enola's next three adventures, as I’d definitely reread them in comic form. Thank you to Netgalley and to Andrews McMeel Publishing for this ARC in exchange for my review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC provided by the Publisher When Enola Holmes' mother runs away, her brothers Mycroft and Sherlock feel a need to take the young woman under their care and force her to do all of the sorts of things that were expected of young girls in the late 1800s. Not wanting to give up her freedom, Enola takes the money her mother left her, follows her clues, and runs away. After working on a mystery involving a missing young lord, she sets up shop under the name of Dr. Ragostin, and pretends to be his ass ARC provided by the Publisher When Enola Holmes' mother runs away, her brothers Mycroft and Sherlock feel a need to take the young woman under their care and force her to do all of the sorts of things that were expected of young girls in the late 1800s. Not wanting to give up her freedom, Enola takes the money her mother left her, follows her clues, and runs away. After working on a mystery involving a missing young lord, she sets up shop under the name of Dr. Ragostin, and pretends to be his assistant, Ivy Meshle. She takes on a case involved a young Lady who was forced to be betrothed to a man, and discovers the sinister mind control at work over this artistic young person. Finally, in The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets, while she is still on the run from her brothers, she investigates the disappearance of Sherlock's assistant, Dr. Watson. The illustrations are really the selling point here, and there are lots of details and notes about Enola's investigations. Since it's a historical setting, it's good to see the clothing and hair styles, and the details about corsets make a lot more sense with pictures for readers who are going to be completely kerflummoxed by the garment. There's a lot of detail in the drawings, and plenty of text. It's been a while since I've read the whole series, but I've read the original at least twice. There seem to be a lot of details about Enola's childhood that are lacking, and the first mystery doesn't seem quite complete if it's held up to the book. Since this is "A graphic novel adaptation of the hit books that inspired the Netflix film" AND translated from the French, it's really rather remarkable that it bears any resemblance to the original at all! (This seems to be a trend. I was amazed at a recent Clifford retelling as well.) It's been a bit tough to get my students to read The Case of the Missing Marquess, and I'm unsure how many of them have seen the Netflix film, but graphic novels are hugely popular in my library. Even graphic novel reimagings of classics like Anne of Green Gables, The Secret Garden, and Tom's Midnight Garden circulate well, so I'm sure the Netflix tie-in will make this even more appealing. I personally prefer Springer's wonderful writing and the additional details found in the original books, but perhaps the graphic novels (there's a second volume with three more titles in it) will encourage readers to investigate Enola's adventures in prose.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sophia The Book Fairy 🧚🏻‍♀️

    huge thanks to andrew mcmeel publishing for this arc!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Literary And Lit

    Beautiful vivid colors, a lively sense of action and motion! I requested "Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels" because I'm familiar with Enola, but I've never read any novels about the teen sister of Sherlock Holmes (a modern addition to YA literature). I also thought they would be easy to digest, fun reads. I was right! Enola is strongwilled, spontaneous and as clever as her brother. Her exploits were fun to follow and I think younger audiences will enjoy solving cases with her. Along with great st Beautiful vivid colors, a lively sense of action and motion! I requested "Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels" because I'm familiar with Enola, but I've never read any novels about the teen sister of Sherlock Holmes (a modern addition to YA literature). I also thought they would be easy to digest, fun reads. I was right! Enola is strongwilled, spontaneous and as clever as her brother. Her exploits were fun to follow and I think younger audiences will enjoy solving cases with her. Along with great stories, the art in "Enola" is stunning! I believe the artist used markers to achieve their style, but the effect is more like a stylized watercolor. The story flows well from panel to panel with bright splashes, and I was entertained enough to read all three in one sitting. The pages at the end of each novel showing Enola's investigation journal were a cute touch. My younger self would've searched their details for clues to the cases Enola was working. I think these graphic novels would be a great choice to read with a younger child or for a tween/young teen to read alone. A great introduction to graphic novels or the tradition of Sherlock Holmes!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I’ve not read any of the original books or seen the Netflix show, but I’ve heard about them and was excited to read this graphic novel. First off, the artwork is gorgeous. It has quite a historical, watercolour feel which complements the storyline really well. The added bits at the end of each “episode”, with little codes and messages along with Ebola’s scribbles and drawings, was really well done. I thought the storylines for each of the three episodes were engaging, and it was easy to forget t I’ve not read any of the original books or seen the Netflix show, but I’ve heard about them and was excited to read this graphic novel. First off, the artwork is gorgeous. It has quite a historical, watercolour feel which complements the storyline really well. The added bits at the end of each “episode”, with little codes and messages along with Ebola’s scribbles and drawings, was really well done. I thought the storylines for each of the three episodes were engaging, and it was easy to forget that Enola is only supposed to be a young teenager (but given her brothers, I don’t doubt her ability to find a lodging house in London on her own!). This is a charming graphic novel, not just for the intended middle grade audience, but for adults as well. The overarching mystery of where Enola’s mother is has yet to be solved, and I’ll be looking out for Book 2 to see what happens next.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    I adore the original Sherlock tales so much that I’ve also read and enjoyed many of the spin-offs and reimaginings! The Nancy Springer series about Enola Holmes was a lot of fun to read, so I was excited about the graphic novels as a way to encourage some of my more reticent students to engage in reading. The graphic novel is a lot of fun and has vibrantly colorful illustrations! I especially loved the graphics at the end that look to be pages from Enola’s notebook! I’ll definitely be purchasing I adore the original Sherlock tales so much that I’ve also read and enjoyed many of the spin-offs and reimaginings! The Nancy Springer series about Enola Holmes was a lot of fun to read, so I was excited about the graphic novels as a way to encourage some of my more reticent students to engage in reading. The graphic novel is a lot of fun and has vibrantly colorful illustrations! I especially loved the graphics at the end that look to be pages from Enola’s notebook! I’ll definitely be purchasing the physical copy for my classroom once it’s released. Thanks to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for the advanced digital copy!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    Despite most of the third story not being in the book [LOTS of blank pages], this was still a highly enjoyable and gorgeously illustrated graphic novel. Enola Holmes is just as inquisitive and intelligent as her famous brother and even more engaging than he is. She is not afraid to do what she needs to do to get things done and I think people of all ages will love these stories. Unfortunately, due to not getting most of the third story [including the ENDING!!], I have no idea how it all ends up Despite most of the third story not being in the book [LOTS of blank pages], this was still a highly enjoyable and gorgeously illustrated graphic novel. Enola Holmes is just as inquisitive and intelligent as her famous brother and even more engaging than he is. She is not afraid to do what she needs to do to get things done and I think people of all ages will love these stories. Unfortunately, due to not getting most of the third story [including the ENDING!!], I have no idea how it all ends up for Enola, but I can guess she lands feet firmly on the ground and her goals all met. I will be looking into the books that this graphic novel is based on. Well done. Thank you to NetGalley, Serena Blasco, and Andrews McMeel Publishing for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle | PurelyBooks

    We received an ARC from @andrewsmcmeel via @netgalley of Serena Blasco’s #EnolaHolmesTheGraphicNovels Book One in exchange for an honest review. 🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸 I was very excited to read this book after watching #EnolaHolmes on @netflix. I actually watched the movie 3 times because I enjoyed it so much. Needless to say, I was very excited when I found out there were graphic novels being released. I haven’t read a graphic novel in a very long time and I forgot how enjoy We received an ARC from @andrewsmcmeel via @netgalley of Serena Blasco’s #EnolaHolmesTheGraphicNovels Book One in exchange for an honest review. 🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸🕵️‍♀️🌸 I was very excited to read this book after watching #EnolaHolmes on @netflix. I actually watched the movie 3 times because I enjoyed it so much. Needless to say, I was very excited when I found out there were graphic novels being released. I haven’t read a graphic novel in a very long time and I forgot how enjoyable they are. This graphic novel in particular contains 3 stories. The first of which follows the Netflix storyline. While I enjoyed the first story, the second and third stories really piqued my interest since I didn’t know anything about them. This book is an enjoyable, fast read and perfect for reading with kids. Also, I have to mention that the art is just so gorgeous. With every turn of the page, you get colorful pictures that make the book that much more enjoyable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kennedy

    Fun fun fun! I love Enola Holmes. While the stories in this book are much abridged (this book includes the first 3 books in the series), they are still very enjoyable. It was fun as an addition to the Enola Holmes world, but the originals are better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julia (Shakespeare and Such)

    4.5/5 stars, full review to come! Alexa, play “that’s my girl” by fifth harmony!!! Plot: 5/5 Characters: 4/5 Pacing: 4/5 Writing: 4/5 Enjoyment: 5/5 Art: 5/5

  19. 4 out of 5

    The Kawaii Slartibartfast

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing. I really enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of the first three Enola Holmes books. The artwork is a lot of fun.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    This graphic novel adaptation of the Nancy Springer books and the Netflix series is full of depth, excellent characterization, vivid settings and 3 mysteries that will keep readers thinking. Enola Holmes, much younger sister of the famous Sherlock, is raised to be an independent thinking and educated young woman during a time when women were expected to learn the social graces and marry well. When her mother disappears, Sherlock and older brother Mycroft arrive on the scene and decide that the b This graphic novel adaptation of the Nancy Springer books and the Netflix series is full of depth, excellent characterization, vivid settings and 3 mysteries that will keep readers thinking. Enola Holmes, much younger sister of the famous Sherlock, is raised to be an independent thinking and educated young woman during a time when women were expected to learn the social graces and marry well. When her mother disappears, Sherlock and older brother Mycroft arrive on the scene and decide that the best place for Enola is boarding school. With that, Enola puts her head into the game, finds and solves her mother’s clues and the money that was hidden for her, and disappears into London to take on various disguises and solve assorted missing persons cases. Each of the three mysteries is separated by fabulous sketches of scenes from the previous mystery as well as a variety of codes and assorted other interesting tidbits. Outstanding choice for any graphic novel collection for those in grades 5 and up. No profanity or sexual content. There are a few somewhat violent occurrences, a relatively bloodless and non-lethal stabbing, a few attempted stranglings and a variety of other “streets of London” events that are key to the plot and relatively bloodless. Thanks for the print arc, Andrews McMeel!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Thank you Netgalley for giving me the opportunity to read this ARC. I absolutely loved this book. I'm a big fan of mysteries both real and fictional so this book was right up my alley. I love looking at the clues and trying to figure out how they match up and the secret messages they lead to. I haven't watched the Netflix film yet but now I really look forward to it. The art style of this graphic novel is beautiful. I think this book would be perfect for parents to read with their children. I th Thank you Netgalley for giving me the opportunity to read this ARC. I absolutely loved this book. I'm a big fan of mysteries both real and fictional so this book was right up my alley. I love looking at the clues and trying to figure out how they match up and the secret messages they lead to. I haven't watched the Netflix film yet but now I really look forward to it. The art style of this graphic novel is beautiful. I think this book would be perfect for parents to read with their children. I think this book can be loved by readers of all ages.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    This book collects the first three graphic novels of the first three original novels in this series, and I had to work out whether that was because they were wonderful, or because Netflix, or because they were, well, cheap to reprint. It took some years before these came out in the original French, so was the source that great, when they didn't seem as urgently produced as some books you'd care to think of? Well, the first story is slightly ungainly, in that it has to set the scene and build the This book collects the first three graphic novels of the first three original novels in this series, and I had to work out whether that was because they were wonderful, or because Netflix, or because they were, well, cheap to reprint. It took some years before these came out in the original French, so was the source that great, when they didn't seem as urgently produced as some books you'd care to think of? Well, the first story is slightly ungainly, in that it has to set the scene and build the world, and then divert to a completely different case. Enola is abandoned on her birthday by her mother, so sends for her older brothers, long absent from the household, to work out why. They fail but she still aspires to follow in their brainbox ways and solve the case for herself – all until she learns of a missing aristocratic lad, that is. The second novel continues with the mother absent, but the girl's burgeoning expertise in disguises and codes (not bad for a fourteen year old) means she feels capable of working on that case and that of another missing member of a high society family. Luckily the mentions of her managing to do things with her youth and gender the police can't aren't as heavy-handed as all the talk of corsets being confining. The pattern is more or less completely confirmed with the third tale, but at least the person gone missing is more interesting here. The pattern includes painted art that I didn't quite favour with, a style to the text that in translation at least seemed old-fashioned and a touch verbose but never felt like Conan Doyle, and a bit of a plodding nature at times, but nothing too off-putting. The stage design at least has a lot of life. There, and not a pointless reference to a certain OMD song in sight. Mother would be proud.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leighton

    Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels by Serena Blasco is an amazing collection of graphic novels that inspired the hit Netflix film. The story revolves 14 year-old Enola, Sherlock Holmes's sister. When her mother disappeared, she tracks down her older brothers Sherlock and Mycroft. Afterwards, she solves several mysteries and shows that she really is her brother's sister. Overall, Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels i Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels by Serena Blasco is an amazing collection of graphic novels that inspired the hit Netflix film. The story revolves 14 year-old Enola, Sherlock Holmes's sister. When her mother disappeared, she tracks down her older brothers Sherlock and Mycroft. Afterwards, she solves several mysteries and shows that she really is her brother's sister. Overall, Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels is a lovely collection of graphic novels that will appeal to fans of Nancy Drew. One highlight of this book is the artwork. The art uses lovely and vibrant watercolors, and it was a joy to look at. Another highlight of this book is the mystery plotlines. Although I didn't really enjoy watching the Netflix film, I did enjoy reading this book. If you're intrigued by the description, or if you're a fan of graphic novels, I highly recommend that you check out this book when it comes out in May!

  24. 5 out of 5

    JoAnna

    Thank you to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for an ARC of this book. All opinions in this review are my own. I really slept on the Enola Holmes train! Having read the newest book by Nancy Springer last year, I was really excited to see some of the other stories adapted into graphic novel form. The movie is so fun, and these mysteries are so entertaining, so it is nice to get to visually see what is happening in the story. The art in this set is really beautiful. I love all of the pieces Thank you to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for an ARC of this book. All opinions in this review are my own. I really slept on the Enola Holmes train! Having read the newest book by Nancy Springer last year, I was really excited to see some of the other stories adapted into graphic novel form. The movie is so fun, and these mysteries are so entertaining, so it is nice to get to visually see what is happening in the story. The art in this set is really beautiful. I love all of the pieces of art/bonus content in-between stories, as I think it really ties each case together and makes it feel fuller. The stories themselves are great, but it isn't hard when you have great source material. This was a really fun way to read some Enola Holmes stories, and I look forward to reading the next set of graphic novels! 5/5

  25. 5 out of 5

    anakdenesor

    If you are familiar with Sherlock Holmes series, then this book is definitely for you. Such a fun, engaging book to read. I love all the details about this book and easy to read too. Only took me about 1 day to finish reading this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Well, I'm sure there are many readers more willing to try this graphic novel adaptation of the first 3 novels of the Enola Holmes series (The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, & The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets), than willing to read those books...but honestly, I liked the books better! Nevertheless, since the first Netflix movie came out, there will certainly be plenty of readers for both print versions, and this is appealing enough. (These graphic novels were orig Well, I'm sure there are many readers more willing to try this graphic novel adaptation of the first 3 novels of the Enola Holmes series (The Case of the Missing Marquess, The Case of the Left-Handed Lady, & The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets), than willing to read those books...but honestly, I liked the books better! Nevertheless, since the first Netflix movie came out, there will certainly be plenty of readers for both print versions, and this is appealing enough. (These graphic novels were originally drawn & published in France in 2015 & 2016, but only translated into English in 2022.) I believe the text remains close to the novels, although I didn't check details...but the fact is that the art doesn't remain close to *itself*! The visual appearance of the main character is so inconsistent that the idea of a disguise is almost absurd. Within the first 12 pages, before Enola has even attempted to dress in a disguise, her hairstyle and hair color has changed multiple times from straight, to curled, from brown to red, and she has dressed in trousers, a simple child's dress, and a teens' fancier dress. While this is in keeping with the impetuous character, it makes the graphic novel a bit confusing and the experience of trying to keep up with it made me feel breathless! This inconsistency continues throughout, with features that shouldn't shift; her eyes are almond-shaped, but extraordinarily wide, and they inexplicably tilt in different directions depending on her mood and expression - in an exaggerated fashion that makes it confusing to keep track of who is who once she starts disguising herself intentionally. Likewise, her fashion choices have obscure details that just don't "read" well; when her bustle is a contrasting color, it looks as if a colorful batch of mushrooms is shadowing her. It doesn't help that the scene changes are often not clearly marked, so she is in one disguise on one page, and a different disguise on the next, when we haven't "seen" her return home, change, etc. Certainly there is a lot of ground to cover in order to get the complex mystery of the 216-page novel to fit into a 62-page graphic novel, so the scenes should convey a lot of background - and they usually do. As a standalone, it works well enough. I guess I just liked the books better, and then I liked the movie even more than the books! So this felt a little disappointing to me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    R. Wood

    Step aside, Sherlock! Enola Holmes, the famous detective’s brilliant and strong-willed younger sister, takes centre stage in this vibrant and delightfully drawn graphic novel adaptation of the first three volumes of Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. When fourteen-year-old Enola wakes on her birthday, she discovers that her mother has disappeared from the family’s country manor, leaving only a collection of flowers and a coded message book. With Mycroft (awful) and Sherlock (who also h Step aside, Sherlock! Enola Holmes, the famous detective’s brilliant and strong-willed younger sister, takes centre stage in this vibrant and delightfully drawn graphic novel adaptation of the first three volumes of Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series. When fourteen-year-old Enola wakes on her birthday, she discovers that her mother has disappeared from the family’s country manor, leaving only a collection of flowers and a coded message book. With Mycroft (awful) and Sherlock (who also have some backward ideas) determined to ship her off to a boarding school, Enola escapes and investigates their mother’s disappearance on her own. But nothing prepares her for what lies ahead. Before going any further, I have to summarize my feelings. I absolutely love the artwork and plan on buying the book just for the pleasure of looking at and feeling the pages (to all the beautiful pinks and purples!). The top-notch watercolour illustrations and the palette chosen are whimsical, and I enjoyed seeing the excerpts from Enola’s secret notebook at the end of each volume, particularly because of all the extra drawings. But as I got to the end of the book, I felt like the story lacked some depth. The premise is great, and I got excited, especially because of how the different clues Enola finds are displayed, how she uses botany and secret codes to find them and also sending messages to her mother. But the episodes are rather short and sometimes the mysteries were solved too quickly, with some pretty far-fetched conclusions to tie it up. It probably kept the essence of the books well, though. For me, it was too fast-paced to be immersive. About the main character, I only have one word to say: outstanding. Well, that’s a lie. She’s exceptional indeed, but I should probably explain why. Enola is just not the average girl. She loves mysteries, knowledge and freedom, reads about Max and is a badass feminist. Commentary on living as a woman in Victorian times abounds. Corsets? That’s a deathtrap! But she finds a positive use for wearing the torture device… And there’s more, so much more. I’m already expecting a sequel. Thank you to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Megan Woldstad

    Note: Thank you to Andrews McMeel Publishing for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Rating: 3.5 stars (rounded up to 4) I feel a little indifferent to this graphic novel after just finishing it. Of course the artwork was absolutely gorgeous and I loved the mysteries, especially the first episode involving Lord Tewkesbury which was a lovely graphic novel rendering of the Netflix movie (made me want to watch it again!) Enola Holmes is simply one of my favor Note: Thank you to Andrews McMeel Publishing for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Rating: 3.5 stars (rounded up to 4) I feel a little indifferent to this graphic novel after just finishing it. Of course the artwork was absolutely gorgeous and I loved the mysteries, especially the first episode involving Lord Tewkesbury which was a lovely graphic novel rendering of the Netflix movie (made me want to watch it again!) Enola Holmes is simply one of my favorite female characters, so every single time I read something including her I get super excited. The author did a lovely job of capturing her voice, especially through the journal entries after each episode. I loved all the little notes and disguises Enola used throughout all the episodes, as well as the overarching plot of finding her mother. With each episode, I enjoyed reading through the different clues Enola found and her use of botany to interpret them. That being said, I did find each episode lacked a lot of depth. At some points I felt lost and confused with how each mystery tied up as there was very little context to a lot of the history/plot progressions. I wish I had seen just a bit more explanation of the mysteries, or maybe more depth to the stories. As each one was in episode format, it makes sense that each character was sort of one dimensional and temporary, but I would have loved to see less focus on making the mysteries super elaborate, and more focus on the depth of the mystery and the context around it. I found this especially with the third episode, as it ended in a rather abrupt way and didn't seem to contribute much to the story except to provide another example of Enola solving a mystery. I look forward to future installments of this series, but hope to see more focus on the quality of the story, rather than the quantity of different elements to add to the mystery. Overall, excited to follow along with Enola's mysteries in the next episodes!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anjana

    I have watched the Enola Homes first season on Netflix and found it a mixed bag. The way the series was taken and the acting was all quite well done. I did not enjoy the portrayal of Mycroft because it felt extremely jarring from the original, and this was the main reason that I did not enjoy it as much as I could have. This graphic novel is a collection of three stories set in the same world, and I was glad that there were two more stories because the first was a scene-by-scene match to the seri I have watched the Enola Homes first season on Netflix and found it a mixed bag. The way the series was taken and the acting was all quite well done. I did not enjoy the portrayal of Mycroft because it felt extremely jarring from the original, and this was the main reason that I did not enjoy it as much as I could have. This graphic novel is a collection of three stories set in the same world, and I was glad that there were two more stories because the first was a scene-by-scene match to the series. This last part is not a flaw exactly, just something most people should know going in. The art was fabulous, and that was the thing I relished the most about this book. The people and the surroundings are very vibrant and linger past the read. I will not go into the details of the plot. If you have not heard of Enola Holmes yet, then all you need to know is that she is the much younger sister of Sherlock, whose mother tried to raise her as a feminist in the world they lived in then. It is not an easy world for someone like Enola, but the adventures and scrapes she gets into are entertaining to the reader. This collection is not a complete one. Enola's mother, who goes missing in the very beginning, is still missing by the end of it. That part of the story is not revealed. I believe there is a further collection which might wrap that part up. My rating is more for the graphic novel part (i.e. the art) than the plotline. Although interesting, it is not much of a draw to me (I do not think the stories are bad, just not for me). I am not sure what kind of audience I can recommend this to, so I leave it to the discerning reader of this review to decide based on all that I have said above. I received an ARC thanks to NetGalley and the publishers, but the review is entirely based on my own reading experience.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I am not typically a graphic novel reader. I have, however, read the Enola Holmes books and wanted to see how the graphic novel measured up to the original. First of all, I have to say that I love the concept of Sherlock Holmes having a younger sister. The fact that she is as clever (or possibly more so) than her famous brother is even more entertaining. I will say that while the reading level of the book is upper elementary and middle grade, the subject matter is still a bit macabre so I would r I am not typically a graphic novel reader. I have, however, read the Enola Holmes books and wanted to see how the graphic novel measured up to the original. First of all, I have to say that I love the concept of Sherlock Holmes having a younger sister. The fact that she is as clever (or possibly more so) than her famous brother is even more entertaining. I will say that while the reading level of the book is upper elementary and middle grade, the subject matter is still a bit macabre so I would recommend it for ages 10 and up. In Book One, Enola (readers will be clued in on the significance of her name) discovers that her mother has disappeared. Then ensues a bit of sleuthing on her part to figure out where she went and--more importantly--why she left (on Enola's birthday of all days!). She enlists the help of her brothers, Sherlock and Mycroft to solve the mystery. The graphic novel retelling of this book was excellently done. The essentials of the story were kept in line with the original and I think this version makes the story more accessible to a variety of reading levels. This format also helps bring the story to life for visual learners and readers who may have difficulty focusing on a full page of print. It can be a challenge to find graphic novels with appropriate content for younger audiences. Parents will be relieved that this book is not only free of profanity but refreshingly free of women with exaggerated bustlines (that so often permeate superhero comics). I highly recommend this book and look forward to reading more of Enola's adventures in this colorful and engaging format! Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of Enola Holmes: The Graphic Novels through NetGalley. No other compensation was received.

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