Hot Best Seller

Sexy But Psycho: How the Patriarchy Uses Women’s Trauma Against Them

Availability: Ready to download

Angry, opinionated, mouthy, aggressive, hysterical, mad, disordered, crazy, psycho, delusional, borderline, hormonal . . . Women have long been pathologized, locked up and medicated for not conforming to whichever norms or stereotypes are expected of them in that time and space. Sexy But Psycho is a challenging and uncomfortable book which seeks to explore the way professi Angry, opinionated, mouthy, aggressive, hysterical, mad, disordered, crazy, psycho, delusional, borderline, hormonal . . . Women have long been pathologized, locked up and medicated for not conforming to whichever norms or stereotypes are expected of them in that time and space. Sexy But Psycho is a challenging and uncomfortable book which seeks to explore the way professionals and society at large pathologize and sexualise women and girls. Utilising decades of research, real case studies and new data from her own work, Dr Taylor's book will critically analyse the way we label women with personality disorders. Why are women and girls pathologized for being angry about oppression and abuse? How have so many women been duped into believing that they are mentally ill, for having normal and natural reactions to their experiences? Sexy But Psycho argues that there is a specific purpose to convincing women and girls that they are mentally ill, as the world avoids addressing violence against women and their centuries of ignored trauma.


Compare

Angry, opinionated, mouthy, aggressive, hysterical, mad, disordered, crazy, psycho, delusional, borderline, hormonal . . . Women have long been pathologized, locked up and medicated for not conforming to whichever norms or stereotypes are expected of them in that time and space. Sexy But Psycho is a challenging and uncomfortable book which seeks to explore the way professi Angry, opinionated, mouthy, aggressive, hysterical, mad, disordered, crazy, psycho, delusional, borderline, hormonal . . . Women have long been pathologized, locked up and medicated for not conforming to whichever norms or stereotypes are expected of them in that time and space. Sexy But Psycho is a challenging and uncomfortable book which seeks to explore the way professionals and society at large pathologize and sexualise women and girls. Utilising decades of research, real case studies and new data from her own work, Dr Taylor's book will critically analyse the way we label women with personality disorders. Why are women and girls pathologized for being angry about oppression and abuse? How have so many women been duped into believing that they are mentally ill, for having normal and natural reactions to their experiences? Sexy But Psycho argues that there is a specific purpose to convincing women and girls that they are mentally ill, as the world avoids addressing violence against women and their centuries of ignored trauma.

30 review for Sexy But Psycho: How the Patriarchy Uses Women’s Trauma Against Them

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pandora Lapin

    I should have looked into the author a bit more, as she writes about wanting a safer world for women, while expressly erasing trans women and AFAB non-binary people. Unfortunately that aspect of her writing cancels out the appreciation I had for her taking socioeconomic background more seriously. She's also a medication shamer/ sceptic, and her arguments around those issues are vastly simplified, without proposing any solutions. I think she needs another ten years of experience in treating patie I should have looked into the author a bit more, as she writes about wanting a safer world for women, while expressly erasing trans women and AFAB non-binary people. Unfortunately that aspect of her writing cancels out the appreciation I had for her taking socioeconomic background more seriously. She's also a medication shamer/ sceptic, and her arguments around those issues are vastly simplified, without proposing any solutions. I think she needs another ten years of experience in treating patients before she decides there's a OSFA fit for every single woman. Hugely disappointing, as the laws around DV and IPV are pathetic, and we need enlightened, educated work around them to save women's lives. (She also misgenders singer Demi Lovato, which is just flat-out unprofessional.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I devoured this book. Taylor provides the roadmap for the Revolution. It’s the first book I’ve seen that addresses this horrific phenomenon head-on. Millions of women and girls will benefit by what she has set in motion here. Kudos to the author for speaking truth to power and liberating so many from this worldwide misunderstanding and oppression.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    Is psychiatry really just ‘patriarchy with a prescription pad’? When I started reading Sexy But Psycho I thought this was perhaps a bold claim but Dr Taylor is able, emphatically and decisively, to demonstrate that this is far more than a ‘claim’. It is a distressing, disturbing and uncomfortable read, but a very important and enlightening one nonetheless. On the one hand it might be seen as an alarming exposé and yet, is it anything more than a nudge to alert us to what many of us have known, o Is psychiatry really just ‘patriarchy with a prescription pad’? When I started reading Sexy But Psycho I thought this was perhaps a bold claim but Dr Taylor is able, emphatically and decisively, to demonstrate that this is far more than a ‘claim’. It is a distressing, disturbing and uncomfortable read, but a very important and enlightening one nonetheless. On the one hand it might be seen as an alarming exposé and yet, is it anything more than a nudge to alert us to what many of us have known, or at least suspected, for quite some time? Aside from the case studies and contributors stories, one of the more disturbing elements (for me) was recognition of how easy it is to slip into pathologisation, victim-blaming and self-blaming of and by ourselves, unintentionally and unnoticed, because we’re so indoctrinated and conditioned to accept the medical model of psychiatry. Dr Taylor demonstrates how double-standards, gaslighting and self-referential arguments are rife and how the very ‘labels’ that are used to discredit and stigmatise women are simultaneously used to excuse men. She reminds us that not everything that is uncomfortable or unpleasant is a disease to be diagnosed and medicated and that difficult human experiences and emotions can be best addressed and supported by humans. I wholeheartedly hope that this book is not just ‘preaching to the converted’ but will be a dynamic catalyst for change.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Helen Morgan

    This was the really difficult read, not because of writing style or wording, but because the subject matter is truly upsetting. That's the point though. It's a very thought provoking read. I would definitely recommend. And, like any competent academic, Dr Taylor sites all research, which would allow any reader that was so inclined to see her evidence and research trail. Give this book a chance. It will make you want to cry, but it will also make you think. This was the really difficult read, not because of writing style or wording, but because the subject matter is truly upsetting. That's the point though. It's a very thought provoking read. I would definitely recommend. And, like any competent academic, Dr Taylor sites all research, which would allow any reader that was so inclined to see her evidence and research trail. Give this book a chance. It will make you want to cry, but it will also make you think.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Chung

    This was the book I needed a year ago when it seemed like everyone from friends to doctors and psychiatrists was hellbent on labeling me with a personality disorder. It reconfirmed my thoughts all along that there was nothing inherently wrong with me, that I am simply but a product of a society that has sought to objectify, sexualize, control, and violate women from time immemorial, and that my rebellion against this was perfectly normal and rational. I like what Dr. Taylor had to say about this This was the book I needed a year ago when it seemed like everyone from friends to doctors and psychiatrists was hellbent on labeling me with a personality disorder. It reconfirmed my thoughts all along that there was nothing inherently wrong with me, that I am simply but a product of a society that has sought to objectify, sexualize, control, and violate women from time immemorial, and that my rebellion against this was perfectly normal and rational. I like what Dr. Taylor had to say about this: “Knowing that women and girls exist in a patriarchy where they are likely to be subjected to traumas and violations over and over, and then convincing them that their natural and rational reactions are mental health issues, psychoses, and personality disorders is one of the most insulting, insidious, and powerful forms of victim blaming of women that has ever been developed and maintained.” This was such a powerful read sprinkled with amazing gems about the court system and the myth of adverse childhood experiences, and should be a must-read for students of psychology/psychiatry interested in the sociohistorical context from which they practice. It is time that we as a society actually give a shit about women and the trauma and harms that comes with being a woman instead of labeling us as crazy, hysterical, borderline, psychotic, etc. Nope, we are none of those; we’ve just had enough of your misogynistic BS.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Disappointed by the transphobia and trans erasure by the author. Of which I didn't know about until after I'd purchased the book. There's some really interesting points in this book, but the silencing of non-binary and trans people is deafening. I'm honestly not sure how to rate this. Disappointed by the transphobia and trans erasure by the author. Of which I didn't know about until after I'd purchased the book. There's some really interesting points in this book, but the silencing of non-binary and trans people is deafening. I'm honestly not sure how to rate this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rupi

    Such an important book for understanding mental health, trauma and oppression. It's really sheds light on how inadequate our mental health systems are even in this day and age and how limited widely accepted ideas about mental health really are. This book has given me even more motivation to be as compassionate, trauma-informed and humanistic as I can be as a mental health nurse. Such an important book for understanding mental health, trauma and oppression. It's really sheds light on how inadequate our mental health systems are even in this day and age and how limited widely accepted ideas about mental health really are. This book has given me even more motivation to be as compassionate, trauma-informed and humanistic as I can be as a mental health nurse.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Clague

    This book is a game changer for anyone working with women and girls. Absolutely would recommend to challenge your own thinking.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vee Vee

    Unethically using stories in your book that women have told you without their consent isn't feminism, no matter how working class you are. Under researched, under theorised and overly ambitious. Unethically using stories in your book that women have told you without their consent isn't feminism, no matter how working class you are. Under researched, under theorised and overly ambitious.

  10. 5 out of 5

    A M

    Love Dr. Taylor and love this book. “I do not believe that women and girls who begin to behave, think or feel differently after they have been subjected to male violence are ill, disordered, problematic or abnormal at all. Instead, I would argue that it is completely natural and normal to be distressed, traumatised and changed by these crimes against them.” “If a girl is abused and neglected, wouldn’t it be completely normal for her to be traumatised by that? Wouldn't her nightmares or fears or an Love Dr. Taylor and love this book. “I do not believe that women and girls who begin to behave, think or feel differently after they have been subjected to male violence are ill, disordered, problematic or abnormal at all. Instead, I would argue that it is completely natural and normal to be distressed, traumatised and changed by these crimes against them.” “If a girl is abused and neglected, wouldn’t it be completely normal for her to be traumatised by that? Wouldn't her nightmares or fears or anger be totally normal? Wouldn't it be abnormal for her not to be affected? Psychiatry relies on the framing of normal trauma responses as abnormal or disordered thinking and behaviour.” “When girls are growing up in a misogynistic society that frequently sexualises, objectifies, traumatises, patronises, feminises and vilifies them - a trauma-informed perspective would clearly argue that it is rational for girls to wish to escape femininity, and their female bodies. It would make sense that they would feel safer if they presented to the world as non-binary or masculine. Therefore, there is much evidence to suggest that a girl or woman seeking to live as non-binary or masculine does not constitute a psychiatric disorder. It does, however, suggest that girls are traumatised, looking for an escape hatch from the patriarchal norms which govern them, and place great value on non-binary, non-feminine and pro-masculine roles and presentations” “There has been a clear path from being castigated as a witch, to being labelled as crazy, to the modern- day diagnosis as a woman or girl with a personality disorder.” “I was managing a rape centre back in 2013 when it became apparent to me that almost every woman on our caseload and waiting list had been told that she had borderline personality disorder within months of disclosing or reporting sexual violence.” “Professionals working on these cases will know how mental health is often used against girls and women to completely derail their experiences. Their disclosures will be ignored or written up as fantasy. Their injuries will be recorded as self-inflicted. Their fear will be diagnosed as anxiety disorder. Their sadness will be diagnosed as depressive disorders and mood disorders. Their trauma will be diagnosed as a disordered personality.” “What is interesting about the quick and easy accusation of ‘delusions' is how quick and easy it really is. Once said, it is for the woman to prove that she is not delusional. How do you prove you are not delusional?” “Whilst vital research into endometriosis receives little to no resource or funding, here were funded academics writing about how sexy women are with a painful disease, and whether men were getting enough sex from women who were struggling with chronic pain from endometriosis.” “Half of women will receive a psychiatric diagnosis before being diagnosed correctly with an autoimmune condition.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    SUMAYA

    1- The cultural specificity of mental health has always intrigued me. I have spent years wondering why we as white, western, English speaking professionals think we have got it all figured out, whilst ridiculing and discrediting the research, wisdom and medicine of other cultures. 2- When I ask why grief is now classified as a psychiatric disorder, people say to me, ‘Well, it’s normal to grieve for a while and for it to impact you, but when it goes on too long or impacts you too much, that’s whe 1- The cultural specificity of mental health has always intrigued me. I have spent years wondering why we as white, western, English speaking professionals think we have got it all figured out, whilst ridiculing and discrediting the research, wisdom and medicine of other cultures. 2- When I ask why grief is now classified as a psychiatric disorder, people say to me, ‘Well, it’s normal to grieve for a while and for it to impact you, but when it goes on too long or impacts you too much, that’s when it becomes a psychiatric disorder.’ I often wonder if those people have ever grieved, because my understanding of grief is that it never really goes away. 3- Trauma responses are almost always proportionate, in my opinion. Women are oppressed globally, subjected to violence and abuse, harassment and discrimination, gender roles and heteronormative pressures to be the perfect woman for men – and this is without individual events of crisis, trauma, attacks, injuries, rape, trafficking, exploitation, poverty, homelessness, persecution, natural disasters and war. 4- We are a product of all of our millions of experiences in life. However, trauma is a lifelong journey and it will impact women in different ways throughout the lifespan. 5- “Arguably, if something is so common that everyone will experience it, why are we describing it as an abnormality or disorder at all?” حقيقي ليه؟؟ 6- Being female was literally classified as a mental disorder for centuries. Women had always been described by philosophers, scientists and physicians as defective, deformed, mutated versions of men. This is where the ‘male as default’ thinking comes from, which plagues science to this day. Women were described as problematic, with a range of mental and physical disorders that men couldn’t (or wouldn’t) decipher. 7- Statistically, many girls will be sexually abused in childhood by men and boys in their lives – but this does not mean that the abuse is a causal factor in their sexual orientation. If it was, and being subjected to male violence caused women and girls to change sexuality, the majority of the female population would be lesbian or bisexual. 8- I don’t have many strong emotional connections to people, but the ones I do have are extremely important to me. I have no interest in small talk, frivolous issues or being polite for no reason. I am not very diplomatic and I can come across as cold and disinterested in others. 9- Medical research has shown that antipsychotics cause a range of health conditions in children including significant weight gain, drowsiness and diabetes. 10- Trauma is trauma. Trauma responses are natural, normal, rational and justified. Trauma performs an important physical, social and psychological function. It does not cause personality disorders. It does not cause psychiatric issues. It does not cause criminality. It does not cause attachment disorders. 11- We cannot ignore the connection between patriarchy, sexualisation, misogyny and psychiatry. For many women working on these wards, they witness male doctors abusing, controlling, derogating and even flirting with women with diagnoses of personality disorders. Challenging them on their decisions and behaviours is not easy, and is risky. For some women, it will cost them their jobs, their shifts, or their promotions. 12- As my interviews with professionals and women continued, it became strikingly clear that women in mental health units were being dehumanised, and female professionals were bearing witness to this oppression and control. More and more women were waking up to the reality of psychiatry as a dangerous, risky place for women and girls to be – and were doing everything they could to subvert an established and powerful system of misogyny. 13- There are two main patterns around women who seek help from medical services: 1. Their physical symptoms, illnesses and injuries are described as mental health issues, exaggeration or fabrication 2. Their trauma, fears, sadness or distress are passed off as physical, chemical or biological issues with the brain What is most interesting about the two pathways to misdiagnosis is that they seem to be the opposite of whatever the woman is saying. 14- Whether it is women reporting cancer symptoms or raising concerns about botched vaginal mesh surgery that has caused them serious health complications, research shows that they are still much more likely to be ignored, minimised or diagnosed with mental health issues. Partially, this will be due to medicine and much of science being based on men and male bodies, with women and female bodies still being seen as too complicated and too much of a variable to be included in medical trials. 15- The overwhelming majority of psychiatrists and certainly GPs have no education to understand they are over-medicating women to levels suited to male bodies and physiological systems. Essentially, we’re still doping women in docility albeit in a different form to what Freud and co. advised for hysteria. 16- Many of us become aware as the years pass that supporting or passively accepting the psychiatric labelling of women and girls will harm them in the long run. They may feel better temporarily, whilst they feel in control, empowered and informed that they have been given a formal diagnosis and prescription which ‘validates’ their ‘mental health’, but what will really happen is that they will be pathologised, judged, stigmatised and treated as though they are going to be mentally ill for the rest of their lives. 17- Women are not responsible for being victims of sexual assault, rape or domestic violence. They do not need to learn how to not date shit men. Men need to not be shit. 18- It’s hard to agree that there are people in the world with disorders of personality which they will have for the rest of their lives. And that’s without dipping into the controversial discussion of what a personality even is, and how it’s defined and constructed with different psychological theories 19- Trauma isn’t a one-off event, and so, processing the trauma is not a one-off event either. These are not medical ‘relapses’ of a mental disorder which require an increased dosage of psychotropic drugs to manage, they are just natural responses to environmental and psychological triggers. 20- The fact that the longer you stay in abuse, the ‘stronger’ you must be. 21- ‘trauma bonding’, ‘battered woman syndrome’ and ‘Stockholm syndrome’. It may be a shock to some readers to discover that all three of these diagnoses are based in misogyny and victim blaming. 22- I often say that the most dangerous professionals working in this field are the ones who tell you that they are ‘completely objective’, ‘only make decisions based on the facts’ and can ‘leave their personal stuff at the door’. In my view, any professional who says these things lacks basic self-awareness, and considers themself above human bias, and human error. Anyone who truly believes they can cut off their experiences, biases, socialisation and upbringings whilst they work with humans has no capacity (or desire) for self-reflection or humility.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ieva

    I gave it three stars not because it was mediocre book, but because it was both horrible and great, at the same time. Let’s to step by step. Things I loved: * The overall argument about the need to have a more trauma-informed approach, and that, in comparison to the medical diagnosis-prone approaches, it is more humanising, ethical, and effective. Diagnoses are shortcuts that might be neither useful, nor efficient. Medications aren’t cure-alls. * The inclusion of personal stories; they are weaved i I gave it three stars not because it was mediocre book, but because it was both horrible and great, at the same time. Let’s to step by step. Things I loved: * The overall argument about the need to have a more trauma-informed approach, and that, in comparison to the medical diagnosis-prone approaches, it is more humanising, ethical, and effective. Diagnoses are shortcuts that might be neither useful, nor efficient. Medications aren’t cure-alls. * The inclusion of personal stories; they are weaved in very interestingly into the narrative (albeit sometimes quite repetitive). Statistics are great, but they dehumanise. This is not a topic you want to dehumanise. * A more systemic approach, looking at how centuries of history have framed our current psychiatric system, rather than simply blaming the people working in the system. She’s right; they weren’t taught alternatives and they’re oft punished for looking for them. * A push to be more critical of mental health professionals; to trust yourself when it comes to your emotions. There are great experts in mental health, but just because one has a title of psychiatry doesn’t mean one’s part of the good ones. * A nuanced argument around CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), ie that it is good for some things (eg fear of heights) and horrible for others (eg years and years of complex trauma). I have long been very skeptical of CBT approaches and it’s interesting to be presented with a view that is both contextualized and actually makes sense. Things I hated: * Trans-erasure. Why? Like, really, why? Not only did the erasure (sometimes even blatant denial) of trans experiences weaken her argument, but more importantly, it was unethical, angering, and very unfeminist. Was really close to giving it 1* just for this. * The overly strong dichotomy of “women = victims” and “men = perpetrators”. Not only can women be just as strong in perpetuating misogynistic systems, but men’s experiences in this book were much too often undermined or disregarded. She was all too quick to denote the mis-diagnoses of men as extensions of women being pathologised. How different is that to seeing women as derivations from men, really? This book could’ve really used a chapter on how the system might also victimize men. * An overfocus on sexual abuse. Yes, that’s a VERY important topic, but it leads one to simplify the plethora of stressors and traumas that women can experience. What about poverty? Childhood neglect? Early deaths of family members? There are so many possible traumas and this book could have really benefited from taking a more extensive look at them, rather than simply defaulting only and solely to sexual violence. * An unwillingness to see any benefits to the medical model or medication. Medications can be a great tool to manage excessive symptoms during trauma flashbacks or immediate post-trauma responses. They won’t cure, but they can help you heal. * On the same note, even though I was reading this book with an open heart and mind, I still disagree that no mental health disorders exist. Maybe it’s me being defensive, sure, but I don’t think the author sufficiently proved that issues like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder do not exist, and that they’re completely natural. That might also be because she conveniently avoided the two + avoided talking about male experiences, which could’ve helped her push her argument forward, but what do I know :))) Overall, it’s an interesting read. It challenges you in almost every page, opens your eyes to the world of psychiatric denial and overly quick diagnosing, and also introduces topics you might have not known existed in real life (eg satanic ritual abuse). But also, take it with a grain of salt. Be open but critical; she also takes shortcuts sometimes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ioanna-nolia

    A must read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eva Allen

    "by the end of this book. I will have changed the way you see girls and women's mental health forever". At the end and it's couple of studies of individuals experiences which you'd find in a magazine like NOW. "by the end of this book. I will have changed the way you see girls and women's mental health forever". At the end and it's couple of studies of individuals experiences which you'd find in a magazine like NOW.

  15. 5 out of 5

    October

    Anyone concerned about how she unapolgetically talks about women, adult human females, is part of the problem she addresses. She makes many excellent points and analysis' in this book, giving a refreshing alternative look at psychiatry. Medical misogyny is everywhere, including psychiatry, and Dr Taylor does an excellent job of discussing the impact on women. Anyone concerned about how she unapolgetically talks about women, adult human females, is part of the problem she addresses. She makes many excellent points and analysis' in this book, giving a refreshing alternative look at psychiatry. Medical misogyny is everywhere, including psychiatry, and Dr Taylor does an excellent job of discussing the impact on women.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tim Regan

    Important but harrowing book. It sent me back to my first year at university in York in 1984. I cannot remember why but I got interested in the way we treat mental health and went along to a campaign meeting against ECT. Interestingly there was also a doctor there who put up a spirited case in favour. It's so long ago I could be misremembering everything but I remember feeling baffled. How could such a barbaric practice still be happening? Was the history of ECT really that nuts? Was it effective Important but harrowing book. It sent me back to my first year at university in York in 1984. I cannot remember why but I got interested in the way we treat mental health and went along to a campaign meeting against ECT. Interestingly there was also a doctor there who put up a spirited case in favour. It's so long ago I could be misremembering everything but I remember feeling baffled. How could such a barbaric practice still be happening? Was the history of ECT really that nuts? Was it effective? Almost 40 years later Taylor covers this point again, though she fills in lots of the detail I was missing then, especially about the risks and the mealy mouthed way those risks are hidden. That's just one example of the horrors recounted in this book. Chapter after chapter left me oscillating between outrage, sadness, shock, ... It is so so wrong that the practises she describes are so commonplace. I am still confused/troubled though. The acquaintances I have who have been through the medicalisation of serious mental health issues are, unsurprisingly, very difficult people to spend time with. It feels like a complicated intractable problem. Anyway some things are clear: we need to be very careful about treating psychiatric diagnoses with the same level of trust we treat other medical diagnoses, we need ways that people can remove a disorder from their records as it impacts so much of how powerful structures in society treat them, and we need to challenge many of the categories used in psychiatry and psychology (what's their history? are they contended? how accurate is any test for them? ...) Two caveats about this book. Taylor places the blame on patriarchy and misogyny. She spends lots of the book evidencing this. For those of us already persuaded by feminism this is a natural conclusion. But if you are someone who is put off by feminism then this will be a struggle to read. The other caveat's much more fun. I did the audio edition of the book, which Taylor reads herself. She has a very down-to-earth writing style and her narration follows suite. I wonder what American readers will make of her describing things (correctly) as "complete bollocks".

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    If I could give this zero stars I would. I'd heard the mixed reviews and decided to read it for myself (thankfully I found a free download). This book is so extremely damaging and is not the world changer the author thinks it is. Do I agree that the way women are treated within psychology can be misogynistic? Absolutely. Do I believe mental illness is fake and everything is only caused by trauma? Absolutely not. The constant denying of certain disorders (especially Bipolar and BPD) and medicatio If I could give this zero stars I would. I'd heard the mixed reviews and decided to read it for myself (thankfully I found a free download). This book is so extremely damaging and is not the world changer the author thinks it is. Do I agree that the way women are treated within psychology can be misogynistic? Absolutely. Do I believe mental illness is fake and everything is only caused by trauma? Absolutely not. The constant denying of certain disorders (especially Bipolar and BPD) and medication is extremely ableist. Not only that, but there are just blatant lies written. At one point the author tries to link the addition of MRI and neuropsychology to the exploitation of women. However, she never explains how she got to that point. Also, brain scans show how trauma literally changes the brain, yet Taylor never mentions that because it doesn't fit her narrative. The transphobia is also appalling. At one point she suggests that transitioning only happens because of trauma. Many trans men and women would disagree. Not to mention the misgendering of Demi Lovato. When talking about post partum depression, Taylor also neglects to discuss the fact that this dip in mood and increase in suicidal ideation is caused by hormones. Instead she only talks about abuse. I also question the consent of the subjects within the book, especially in instances in chapter 7 when the author mentions a young a&e patient while Taylor was ALSO a patient. Not to mention the women who have come forward stating they never gave consent to be featured. Lastly, if the mental illness in women is fake and only caused by abuse and patriarchy, then why do the same issues exist in men?? Overall it's poorly researched and poorly written and should not be taken as truth. Edit: forgot to mention the author self publishes which means there is no peer review going on

  18. 4 out of 5

    bowiesbooks

    The thing that I liked the most about this book was how accessible it was. It was split into digestible chapters that were clearly labelled and set out distinctly. I think this means so many more people will be able to read and understand this challenging and dense book. I really appreciated this because there is so much fascinating information out there that is simply difficult to understand and quite overwhelming. Thankfully, this book highlighted the topics well and it was a lot easier to gra The thing that I liked the most about this book was how accessible it was. It was split into digestible chapters that were clearly labelled and set out distinctly. I think this means so many more people will be able to read and understand this challenging and dense book. I really appreciated this because there is so much fascinating information out there that is simply difficult to understand and quite overwhelming. Thankfully, this book highlighted the topics well and it was a lot easier to grapple with! It follows many different sections within how women who have gone through significant traumas in their lives have been medicated as ways of keeping them quiet and easy to deal with. Dr Taylor breaks down the history of women and medicine, black people and medicine and gay people and medicine and how that truly effects us today. She discusses a range of topics from how portrays of women’s mental health in the media that are incredibly harmful to how it can actually be worse for women in the long run to be diagnosed. I thought it was great that at the end there was a list of tangible actions to take in order to stop simply medicalising women before taking the time to learn them and their traumas. Overall, Dr Taylor is correct in saying that this book is indeed uncomfortable. It is not an ‘easy’ read but it is definitely a necessary read and one that will make you learn and shift your mindset.

  19. 5 out of 5

    M B

    After finally getting my hands on this book, I have to say it completely changed my outlook on psychiatry and psychology. The extend to which the system disadvantages and hurts women is appalling and this book is a much needed resource for professionals and students in this field (like myself). I honestly don’t understand why people accuse the author of „trans exclusion“. This book is about women‘s systematic oppression in the field of psychiatry. It does not have to include every single person o After finally getting my hands on this book, I have to say it completely changed my outlook on psychiatry and psychology. The extend to which the system disadvantages and hurts women is appalling and this book is a much needed resource for professionals and students in this field (like myself). I honestly don’t understand why people accuse the author of „trans exclusion“. This book is about women‘s systematic oppression in the field of psychiatry. It does not have to include every single person on this planet. If this book being about females only offends you so much that you don’t want to continue reading it or discount its whole content, then maybe the book isn’t the problem, but you are. I wholeheartedly believe that no author ever is 100% on the same wavelength as you yourself, but that doesn’t make their input any less important. My „mind blowing“-experience in this book was the explanation of how personality disorders are being diagnosed and how they are used against the victims after the fact.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sabra Thomas

    Don't abuse the trust of traumatized women to sell a book about how much the psychiatric system traumatizes women. You'd think that'd be an incredibly simple no-brainer, and yet. https://twitter.com/sallyann98745/sta... Don't abuse the trust of traumatized women to sell a book about how much the psychiatric system traumatizes women. You'd think that'd be an incredibly simple no-brainer, and yet. https://twitter.com/sallyann98745/sta...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte kierans

    Sensational There are not enough words to explain how life changing this book is and will be for millions of women.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Saunders

    A lot of people, especially health care professionals are going to be really peeved with this book. I for one totally agree with most of what Jessica Taylor has to say and would urge anyone working with Traumatised people to read it. Can’t wait to see what happens next and I will definitely be taking this into work with me!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Martin Purcell

    A must read for anyone with blood circulating in their body. Male or female. 'Sane' or diagnosed with a 'disorder'. The world needs to take notice of Jessica's precise analysis and solution-focussed plea for a more humane socuetal response to trauma of all kinds and as experienced by so many. A must read for anyone with blood circulating in their body. Male or female. 'Sane' or diagnosed with a 'disorder'. The world needs to take notice of Jessica's precise analysis and solution-focussed plea for a more humane socuetal response to trauma of all kinds and as experienced by so many.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Dutson

    Very interesting perspective. I agree with many of these arguments but was left feeling that with these as so many issues currently, people are taking completely polarised perspectives and I feel this further entrenches problems so we are getting further away from solving them. I disagree that Psychiatry is universally destructive on women’s lives -some people do have help and feel better and also some people are damaged and discriminated by the discipline. I thought some of her arguments were a Very interesting perspective. I agree with many of these arguments but was left feeling that with these as so many issues currently, people are taking completely polarised perspectives and I feel this further entrenches problems so we are getting further away from solving them. I disagree that Psychiatry is universally destructive on women’s lives -some people do have help and feel better and also some people are damaged and discriminated by the discipline. I thought some of her arguments were a bit lazy in this regard. But also she shakes up notions of mental illness and challenges how people are pigeon holed and labelled. I think those lucky enough to have not had anything to do with mh services will find this book interesting- how often psychiatrists are trusted to universally know who is Ill and how to treat them and this is just not the case mostly it is luck or guess work.! Based on stereotypes, especially gendered ones.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cal Davie

    Certainly a dynamic book. Hard for anyone to agree fully with Taylor, but she raises important issues for the negative impact of psychiatry on women. It's unfortunate that she sees things through the lens of some kind of "patriarchy", which leads her naturally to an array of errors in misunderstanding causes of issues she raises. In saying that "negative elements of psychiatry that specifically impact women" isn't as sexy a title, and doesn't lend itself to as big controversial complaints. The boo Certainly a dynamic book. Hard for anyone to agree fully with Taylor, but she raises important issues for the negative impact of psychiatry on women. It's unfortunate that she sees things through the lens of some kind of "patriarchy", which leads her naturally to an array of errors in misunderstanding causes of issues she raises. In saying that "negative elements of psychiatry that specifically impact women" isn't as sexy a title, and doesn't lend itself to as big controversial complaints. The book is interesting and worth reading, especially with criticisms of the over-diagnosis of BPD amongst women, and the history of psychiatry's uncomfortable sexist past. It raises many conceptual issues within the mental illness debate which are worth considering. However Dr. Taylor is a little bit too extreme in her opinions in both her militant feminism and antipsychiatry.

  26. 5 out of 5

    my bookworm life

    📖 New review. [pr review copy] This was such an interesting and also shocking read. One of those non fiction reads where you have so many moments thinking ‘this can’t be real?!’ Even though you know it sadly is!. There is a lot of information and hard hitting accounts to take in with this book but I thought it was broken down, explained and presented very clearly and very well. It’s to the point, I liked its blunt no nonsense approach and delivery throughout. One of those books that you read and 📖 New review. [pr review copy] This was such an interesting and also shocking read. One of those non fiction reads where you have so many moments thinking ‘this can’t be real?!’ Even though you know it sadly is!. There is a lot of information and hard hitting accounts to take in with this book but I thought it was broken down, explained and presented very clearly and very well. It’s to the point, I liked its blunt no nonsense approach and delivery throughout. One of those books that you read and it just makes you feel so saddened but it’s also so interesting too, the main thing is this will raise such awareness and also help many people feel less alone if they have experience in any subject matter this covers, and that is such a brilliant thing. Thank you @littlebrownuk for my copy. Sexy but Psycho is out now 🎉

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jazz Holland

    For anyone with interest in the mental health system this book is incredibly eye opening. Good insight into the patriarchy which exists in the modern day mental health system. Labels women are given, the mistreatment & mistakes made in caring for women whom struggle with their mental health.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Monalisa

    This author had used survivors’ stories without their consent. She is also doxxing them on Twitter. https://mobile.twitter.com/sallyann98... This author had used survivors’ stories without their consent. She is also doxxing them on Twitter. https://mobile.twitter.com/sallyann98...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    A call to arms for trauma informed womens mental health.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Wood

    Absolutely true and shocking. A book that spyglass be read by everyone.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...