Hot Best Seller

30 review for Double Walker (comiXology Originals)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kallista Leigh

    If there’s one thing I love, it’s a good “scary fairy” tale. Michael W Conrad and Noah Bailey do not disappoint with this disturbing yet captivating new graphic novel, Double Walker. The story begins with a short recounting of the origin of “The Old Man of Storr” a well-known rock formation on Scotland’s Isle of Skye. Legend has it that a nameless old giant, aged and tired and ready to cash out his chips, laid down in a nice spot on the Isle and died. His huge body formed the rock formation that If there’s one thing I love, it’s a good “scary fairy” tale. Michael W Conrad and Noah Bailey do not disappoint with this disturbing yet captivating new graphic novel, Double Walker. The story begins with a short recounting of the origin of “The Old Man of Storr” a well-known rock formation on Scotland’s Isle of Skye. Legend has it that a nameless old giant, aged and tired and ready to cash out his chips, laid down in a nice spot on the Isle and died. His huge body formed the rock formation that bears his moniker, and the fae people, cannibalistic AND opportunistic as they are, ate off his corpse for as long as it was edible. Once the meat ran out, their attention turned to … well, let’s just say, OTHER sources of nourishment. At least, that’s the story that the innkeeper tells our two main characters. Cully and Gemma are a pair of American tourists, taking a sightseeing tour of Scotland in what is probably their last few weeks of relative freedom to travel, since Gemma is quite heavily pregnant with their first child. Inexplicably, they choose to take a strenuous hike up to the “Old Man of Storr”, in spite of the fact that Gemma appears ready to give birth soon. (Perhaps not, since Cully mentions that the baby is still 5 months away. But her baby bump is more like a baby boulder, so I don’t know what to say, LOL) It’s not a great day for a hike, weather-wise, and the trail gets muddy and Gemma asks to be left by the wayside to catch her breath, and also to pee in the tall grass by the trail. Cully obliges and takes off towards the rock formation, leaving his lady behind. At this point, I was like, “DUDE. You just left your pregnant wife on the side of a trail in the Highlands of an unfamiliar country, while you bound ahead to snap some selfies? Bad form, Sir. Bad form, indeed.” When Cully returns, he finds Gemma lying in the grass, barely conscious, and spouting Gaelic. Trouble is afoot, obviously. Double Walker captured my attention from the onset, with its promise of folk horror and fae villainy. Don’t get me wrong, I do love the fae… but let’s be real, they’re a little like Mae West … they’re better when they’re bad. By the second act, the story turns towards the crime/detective genre, and you’re wondering if these two hapless Americans are even going to make it out of Scotland alive. Double Walker was a quick read, and I couldn’t put it down. It does get a bit gruesome; just a heads-up for sensitive readers, AND it does deal with themes like miscarriage, and trauma, so tread lightly. Noah Bailey’s illustrations were spot on. The gray tones over pencil drawings created a bleak, murky atmosphere that seemed incredibly fitting for a Northern climate, and the creepy denizens that lurk in it. This was my first exposure to the Conrad/Bailey team, but it was enough to make me eager to read more from this duo. They did work together on another Comixology original with a Neil Gaiman’s Sandman kind of vibe, called Tremor Dose, and I’ll be checking that out as well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fast read that combines multiple genres of dark fairy tale (as others have mentioned, humans who cross paths with the fae never fare well), crime/noir, and psychological thriller. I enjoyed it as an exercise in genre but also found it puzzling that the story delves into the case of Bridget Cleary, a woman murdered by her husband, who claimed that she was a changeling swapped with his wife during an extended separation. The Cleary case is about a woman being punished for becoming more financially Fast read that combines multiple genres of dark fairy tale (as others have mentioned, humans who cross paths with the fae never fare well), crime/noir, and psychological thriller. I enjoyed it as an exercise in genre but also found it puzzling that the story delves into the case of Bridget Cleary, a woman murdered by her husband, who claimed that she was a changeling swapped with his wife during an extended separation. The Cleary case is about a woman being punished for becoming more financially and socially independent of her husband and the conservative society she lives in. Which is why its mention in a story that depicts Gemma's potential possession by a malign force from the Male Gaze. The authors aren't shy in depicting Cully as being self-absorbed and placing the blame for everything that happens after he leaves Gemma behind on a hike he shouldn't have dragged her out on in the first place. Whether or not the authors intended it, I felt like I was reading a piece of Body Horror about male ignorance/fear of the female body and the changes that happen with pregnancy. Including no longer having one's needs/wants at the center of the relationship once a child arrives. The trip and Cully's ill fated hike reads like a guy trying to get his last experience of being young and the center of his wife's world before she changes and somebody else takes his place at the center of the relationship. If the story had run more with this theme, it would've created something even more profound and horrifying.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    No one knows how to take you up a pretty, pastrol cliff… …only to gut-kick you off the side and back down to the ground below like Michael W. Conrad. And when his frequent partner-in-crime, Noah Bailey, is along for said hike, you know exactly what you have asked for. DOUBLE WALKER — out now from comiXology — is the best kind of horror. It eats into our most human of fears until there is nothing left but utter collapse. Here, this is interwoven with Scottish folklore to tell a tale of modern desp No one knows how to take you up a pretty, pastrol cliff… …only to gut-kick you off the side and back down to the ground below like Michael W. Conrad. And when his frequent partner-in-crime, Noah Bailey, is along for said hike, you know exactly what you have asked for. DOUBLE WALKER — out now from comiXology — is the best kind of horror. It eats into our most human of fears until there is nothing left but utter collapse. Here, this is interwoven with Scottish folklore to tell a tale of modern despair. Do yourself the horrible favor of buying it now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Rodrigues

    An American couple on a trip in the Scottish Highlands suffer a tragedy, which coincides with a bizarre string of gory murders popping up. Between Michael Conrad's haunting tale and Noah Bailey's unsettling illustrations, this is a saddening tale of loss, shifting blame, and the frightening fears of faeries. A fantastic read this spooky season. An American couple on a trip in the Scottish Highlands suffer a tragedy, which coincides with a bizarre string of gory murders popping up. Between Michael Conrad's haunting tale and Noah Bailey's unsettling illustrations, this is a saddening tale of loss, shifting blame, and the frightening fears of faeries. A fantastic read this spooky season.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    Solid work. Modern. Dark atmosphere. Small cast of folks, so carries that small-town vibe. Fairly gory, but not excessively so. It contributes to the overall atmosphere. There are times where the wife keeps running off that make you think, “man can’t this guy keep track of his woman?” But beyond that it is solid. I had a really good time with this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Classic tale for now This is a great little horror tale. A re-telling of some classic folklore, merging excellent writing with excellent Art and all the support that goes along with it (lettering, editing, etc. bonus points for acknowledging all the contributors). If you like classic fables brought into present tense and collected into the comic format you’ll dig this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Darren-lee

    Should've had a better ending... Should've had a better ending...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathan J Glomb

    Chilling and amazing Just finished and i Highly recommend reading it! Masterfully done, beautiful and terrifying. This one shook me. I’ll be revisiting it soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    DJ Melchin

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  11. 4 out of 5

    illest_terminal

  12. 4 out of 5

    William

  13. 4 out of 5

    James Rushton

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Corey Marr

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jesus

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zsolti

  18. 5 out of 5

    MayaGo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jon Y.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ries Murphy

  21. 5 out of 5

    G.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tami Brooks

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Hull

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lora

  27. 4 out of 5

    Honeyjam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Churchill

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Pauline

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cristian

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...