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Still Just a Geek: An Annotated Memoir

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Celebrated actor, personality, and all-around nerd, Wil Wheaton updates his memoir of collected blog posts with all new material and annotations as he reexamines one of the most interesting lives in Hollywood and fandom. From starring in Stand by Me to playing Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation to playing himself, in his second (third?) iconic role of Evil Wil Celebrated actor, personality, and all-around nerd, Wil Wheaton updates his memoir of collected blog posts with all new material and annotations as he reexamines one of the most interesting lives in Hollywood and fandom. From starring in Stand by Me to playing Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation to playing himself, in his second (third?) iconic role of Evil Wil Wheaton in The Big Bang Theory, to becoming a social media supernova, Wil Wheaton has charted a career course unlike anyone else, and has emerged as one of the most popular and well respected names in science fiction, fantasy and pop culture. Back in 2001, Wil began blogging on wilwheaton.net. Believing himself to have fallen victim to the curse of the child actor, Wil felt relegated to the convention circuit, and didn't expect many would want to read about his random experiences and personal philosophies. Yet, much to his surprise, people were reading. He still blogs, and now has an enormous following on social media with well over 3 million followers. In Still Just a Geek, Wil revisits his 2004 collection of blog posts, Just a Geek, filled with insightful and often laugh-out-loud annotated comments, additional later writings, and all new material written for this publication. The result is an incredibly raw and honest memoir, in which Wil opens up about his life, about falling in love, about coming to grips with his past work, choices, and family, and finding fulfillment in the new phases of his career. From his times on the Enterprise to his struggles with depression to his starting a family and finding his passion--writing--Wil Wheaton is someone whose life is both a cautionary tale and a story of finding one's true purpose that should resonate with fans and aspiring artists alike.


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Celebrated actor, personality, and all-around nerd, Wil Wheaton updates his memoir of collected blog posts with all new material and annotations as he reexamines one of the most interesting lives in Hollywood and fandom. From starring in Stand by Me to playing Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation to playing himself, in his second (third?) iconic role of Evil Wil Celebrated actor, personality, and all-around nerd, Wil Wheaton updates his memoir of collected blog posts with all new material and annotations as he reexamines one of the most interesting lives in Hollywood and fandom. From starring in Stand by Me to playing Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation to playing himself, in his second (third?) iconic role of Evil Wil Wheaton in The Big Bang Theory, to becoming a social media supernova, Wil Wheaton has charted a career course unlike anyone else, and has emerged as one of the most popular and well respected names in science fiction, fantasy and pop culture. Back in 2001, Wil began blogging on wilwheaton.net. Believing himself to have fallen victim to the curse of the child actor, Wil felt relegated to the convention circuit, and didn't expect many would want to read about his random experiences and personal philosophies. Yet, much to his surprise, people were reading. He still blogs, and now has an enormous following on social media with well over 3 million followers. In Still Just a Geek, Wil revisits his 2004 collection of blog posts, Just a Geek, filled with insightful and often laugh-out-loud annotated comments, additional later writings, and all new material written for this publication. The result is an incredibly raw and honest memoir, in which Wil opens up about his life, about falling in love, about coming to grips with his past work, choices, and family, and finding fulfillment in the new phases of his career. From his times on the Enterprise to his struggles with depression to his starting a family and finding his passion--writing--Wil Wheaton is someone whose life is both a cautionary tale and a story of finding one's true purpose that should resonate with fans and aspiring artists alike.

30 review for Still Just a Geek: An Annotated Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    Wil Wheaton is a national treasure. Not just for being in one of the most popular science-fiction shows of all time. Not just for being in Stand by Me. Or Big Bang Theory. Or The Guild. Wil Wheaton is a national treasure because he has spoken openly and fearlessly about his experiences of child abuse, depression, and anxiety. He has made countless survivors, including myself, feel less alone, less afraid, and more hopeful. And I will always grateful for that. Thank you, Wil. This book has a fasc Wil Wheaton is a national treasure. Not just for being in one of the most popular science-fiction shows of all time. Not just for being in Stand by Me. Or Big Bang Theory. Or The Guild. Wil Wheaton is a national treasure because he has spoken openly and fearlessly about his experiences of child abuse, depression, and anxiety. He has made countless survivors, including myself, feel less alone, less afraid, and more hopeful. And I will always grateful for that. Thank you, Wil. This book has a fascinating structure. Essentially, it is a reprint of his 2004 memoir, JUST A GEEK, which he has annotated in order to reflect upon his experiences with more distance, to demonstrate his growth and changes in perspective, and yes, to tell silly jokes. Though I am in the library world now I am an academic at heart, and I love a good footnote apparatus. It's really fun to flip back and forth between the TNG days, the early aughts, and the present. Wil is an entertaining, thoughtful, and insightful narrator of his own experience, and it is a whole lot of fun to watch him interact with his past selves.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    DNF...but please don't take that as a condemnation of the book, as a whole. Read on, if you're interested. I still have Just A Geek on my bookshelves, though I haven't read it in ages. And while I read a ton, I don't actually keep a lot of books. So I was excited when I got the ARC for this from Edelweiss. But it is just not fun to read digitally. I read relatively quickly, and it took me over an hour to get through the first chapter. At the end of that, my Kindle tells me it will be 17 more hour DNF...but please don't take that as a condemnation of the book, as a whole. Read on, if you're interested. I still have Just A Geek on my bookshelves, though I haven't read it in ages. And while I read a ton, I don't actually keep a lot of books. So I was excited when I got the ARC for this from Edelweiss. But it is just not fun to read digitally. I read relatively quickly, and it took me over an hour to get through the first chapter. At the end of that, my Kindle tells me it will be 17 more hours to finish this book. The original is not a long book! I've not read a book where the footnotes at clickable and it opens a small window, which you read, then close before. Turns out, that severely increases the amount of time it takes to read this book and it's trying my patience. For the actual content, I'm enjoying it. It's a bit repetitive, but I do appreciate the introspection and the humor. So, do what I'm going to do: wait until this actually comes out and buy a real, dead tree copy and enjoy. And buy it from an indie book store, damnit!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I never read Just a Geek and I never watched Star Trek, but I became familiar with Wheaton through Big Bang Theory and other geeky endeavors. I found his original writing touching, funny, and bittersweet, and his annotations made it that much better. He calls himself out for problematic language and jokes, he explains things in greater detail, he gives insight into who he was and what he was thinking at the time. I'm oddly proud of him?? I never read Just a Geek and I never watched Star Trek, but I became familiar with Wheaton through Big Bang Theory and other geeky endeavors. I found his original writing touching, funny, and bittersweet, and his annotations made it that much better. He calls himself out for problematic language and jokes, he explains things in greater detail, he gives insight into who he was and what he was thinking at the time. I'm oddly proud of him??

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    As an academic and a writer, I understand all too well Wheaton's lifelong wrestling match with imposter syndrome. He bares his soul in this memoir--get the audiobook, it's so, so well narrated--and what I love is that he is deeply aware of his own imperfections. Unlike most celebrities who want to present only the best versions of themselves, Wheaton looks back on the writings of his younger self, fleshing out his own stories from a more mature perspective. I do have to take off a star for some As an academic and a writer, I understand all too well Wheaton's lifelong wrestling match with imposter syndrome. He bares his soul in this memoir--get the audiobook, it's so, so well narrated--and what I love is that he is deeply aware of his own imperfections. Unlike most celebrities who want to present only the best versions of themselves, Wheaton looks back on the writings of his younger self, fleshing out his own stories from a more mature perspective. I do have to take off a star for some of the cringe-y, redundant "mea culpas" for the insensitivity of his past self (the "fast forward 30 seconds" button on Audible was very helpful for that), but overall I was immersed in his story. I even got a little teary at a few points, such as the story about leaving his great aunt's house for the last time (anyone who's lost an elderly relative will be affected by that one). His story of child abuse on a film set later in the book broke my heart—it was tough to hear the raw, unfiltered pain in his voice. No other audiobook narrator I know of has taken such a risk. Overall, his life story can seem quite tragic--the memories of someone who spent their 20’s attempting to recapture something they lost before they knew what they had. But it's high time someone spoke out about the trauma of being a child star, and the long-lasting impact that makes on a person's life. I liked him as Wesley Crusher, I liked him as a blogger, and I continue to like him now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    Wil Wheaton proves he is much more than Wesley Crusher in 'Just a Geek' and although this updated and annotated edition may appear to be a retread of a book written at the turn of the century, the notes add insight and clarity on events which were still raw or hidden at the time of initial publication. If readers have already bought 'Just a Geek', the notes themselves are worth the price. If this is the first encounter, buy 'Still Just a Geek'. It's not necessary to buy both titles, unless you wa Wil Wheaton proves he is much more than Wesley Crusher in 'Just a Geek' and although this updated and annotated edition may appear to be a retread of a book written at the turn of the century, the notes add insight and clarity on events which were still raw or hidden at the time of initial publication. If readers have already bought 'Just a Geek', the notes themselves are worth the price. If this is the first encounter, buy 'Still Just a Geek'. It's not necessary to buy both titles, unless you want to reward Wheaton twice.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan Tunis

    I wanted to give this four stars, because much of this was interesting and entertaining. And I especially enjoy listening to celebrity memoirs read by the celebrity. I should probably mention that I'm not a Wil Wheaton fan. Don't get me wrong, I've got nothing against him, but I never saw his Star Trek show, and I didn't know much about him. He was interesting, in that recovering-child-actor sort of way, but there were more than a few things I had problems with. The annotation of a previously pu I wanted to give this four stars, because much of this was interesting and entertaining. And I especially enjoy listening to celebrity memoirs read by the celebrity. I should probably mention that I'm not a Wil Wheaton fan. Don't get me wrong, I've got nothing against him, but I never saw his Star Trek show, and I didn't know much about him. He was interesting, in that recovering-child-actor sort of way, but there were more than a few things I had problems with. The annotation of a previously published memoir format was super confusing in audio. Wait! Was this part written in 1992, 2002, or 2022? I frequently had no idea without something really concrete to anchor the text. The subtle variations of how he pitched his voice just didn't cut it. Throughout the book, Wheaton goes on at length about how much he loves to write, and how it's really his primary job now. If so, why not write something fresh, rather than recycle the same content from a decades old blog, to a decades old book, to an updated book? The non-linear format did nothing to help the storytelling. And there were some truly unfortunate redundancies. This would be a lot more forgivable were the book not so long! The average audiobook is about 9 or 10 hours long. This one clocks in at a whopping 24 hours! Less is more, Wil, less is more! That said, there is definitely new content from the old version of Just a Geek. So, if you just can't get enough Wil Wheaton, today is your lucky day!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brett Plaxton

    I’ve been a fan of Wil Wheaton since I first saw him as Gordie Lachance and Wesley Crusher. When I first got Twitter in 2011, I started following him and began to follow his blog. It was cool to see some of those blog entries in this book. I hadn’t read the original Just a Geek before, but I like the idea of this book being an annotated version of that book. I’ve seen a few people say they thought him holding himself accountable for his cringe writing to be long-winded, but I went the audiobook I’ve been a fan of Wil Wheaton since I first saw him as Gordie Lachance and Wesley Crusher. When I first got Twitter in 2011, I started following him and began to follow his blog. It was cool to see some of those blog entries in this book. I hadn’t read the original Just a Geek before, but I like the idea of this book being an annotated version of that book. I’ve seen a few people say they thought him holding himself accountable for his cringe writing to be long-winded, but I went the audiobook route on this one and it worked for me. Hearing about the abuse he endured was so upsetting, it’s not cool how people are exploited like that at such a young age. Also, love the fuck you to JK Rowling he throws in this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    4/13/2022 Full review tk (maybe even later today!) at TheFrumiousConsortium.net. 4/13/2022 I make it a habit of avoiding memoirs published by men in their 30s, so never got around to reading Wil Wheaton's Just A Geek, despite it seeming squarely in my wheelhouse. Reading this annotated version drove home to me how wise that policy continues to be, despite the many interests the author and I share, including but not limited to Star Trek, sci-fi, acting, blogging, tabletop games and parenting. The t 4/13/2022 Full review tk (maybe even later today!) at TheFrumiousConsortium.net. 4/13/2022 I make it a habit of avoiding memoirs published by men in their 30s, so never got around to reading Wil Wheaton's Just A Geek, despite it seeming squarely in my wheelhouse. Reading this annotated version drove home to me how wise that policy continues to be, despite the many interests the author and I share, including but not limited to Star Trek, sci-fi, acting, blogging, tabletop games and parenting. The trouble with the vast, vast majority of autobiographies written by men in their 30s is that the authors cannot properly view the trauma they've undergone -- which is what largely compels men like these to write these books at this stage in their lives -- without managing to sound both trite and obliviously self-important. The luckiest of these authors at least have an inkling of how much therapy they still need, but almost none of them realize that time (at the very least, and even without the benefit of actively working on your spiritual/emotional well-being) almost always grants a very necessary perspective. Mr Wheaton was, unfortunately, no different. I can absolutely see why Entertainment Weekly succinctly if harshly called the original book whiny. There's a lot of unprocessed trauma on display and a lot of attempts at edginess that just come off as douchebaggery. So it's a fascinating enterprise to see Mr Wheaton tackle his book once more almost two decades later. His annotations are almost all correct, both in exploring the deeper truth behind what he said at the very turn of the 21st century and in apologizing for unfortunate language and narrative choices, with one caveat: I do think that he's actually a little too hard on his younger self, particularly in his adoption of projected optimism as a coping mechanism. Sure, he says now that the confident pronouncements that he made back then were in service to placating the "Prove Everyone Wrong" voice in his head, but there's still value in making positive affirmations about yourself and your goals, and it seems weird to kick his younger self over what was essentially a helpful, if not outright necessary, way to deal with life's disappointments. That said, wow, it's so much better reading this book from the perspective of a dude who's about to turn fifty. I mean, the covers alone evoke the wildly differing atmospheres: the original was incredibly emo while the present version is far more self-deprecating and self-aware. Which isn't at all to say that Mr Wheaton was a bad person when he was younger, or that the angry, self-absorbed essays he wrote at that time have no worth. As a historical snapshot, they're actually a really great look into that era of celebrity and the Internet; as reading material tho, they are 100% Not My Thing. And that's fine: not every book is for everybody. I'm just glad that I came to this version at this age, so I can gain a newfound appreciation for Mr Wheaton instead of being all "JFC, this is what happened to the guy who played Wesley?" Because the Wil Wheaton of recent years can see past the anger and assumptions of his younger self to the scared, sad kid behind the words. He and I don't necessarily have the same perspectives on everything, but I very much valued his present-day thoughts on abuse and mental health and the importance of education and kindness (and greatly appreciate his commitment to good parenting throughout.) The only thing that really stuck out to me was the fact that no one seems to have pointed out to him that his Dad's bullying likely stemmed from an insecurity at no longer being the family's main breadwinner. Which doesn't excuse Dad's really shitty behavior, but definitely makes his abuse and his clear preference for the younger brother seem less inexplicable, IMO. Overall, this was the kind of chronicle that rarely makes its way out of nonfiction: honest and thoughtful, if occasionally uncomfortable for everyone involved. There were parts reading the older version that I thoroughly understood the popularity of the "shut up, Wesley" catchphrase, but I do think that Mr Wheaton has grown to be the kind of good, genuine person that he always thought of himself as being (and hopefully continues to work on being.) It was also really nice to learn that the main cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation get along so well, both then and now. As fun and salacious as it can be to read about backstabbing primi, it's really so much more affirming to read of nurturing and warmth in action. I do recommend getting this book in physical format tho. I'm sure the digital versions will be properly formatted, but I was forced to read this as a sideways pdf on my phone, which had me absolutely seething. Extra irony points for Mr Wheaton being a champion of digital liberty -- not that the formatting was in any way his fault. Sometimes, profit-focused goons screw all us creatives over. Still Just A Geek: An Annotated Collection Of Musings by Wil Wheaton was published April 12 2022 by William Morrow & Company and is available from all good booksellers, including Bookshop.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    I've been a Wil Wheaton fan for what feels like my entire life. I never didn't like Wesley Crusher. . I really loved this memoir. I loved his Star Trek memories. I love his relationship with his wife and kids. I love his sense of humor. I love his openness about his struggle with anxiety and depression. . Just a heads up, this book has a lot of F words. Like, a lot of F words. But listening to Wil Wheaton tell his story was so touching that I pressed forward. Your mileage may vary. I've been a Wil Wheaton fan for what feels like my entire life. I never didn't like Wesley Crusher. . I really loved this memoir. I loved his Star Trek memories. I love his relationship with his wife and kids. I love his sense of humor. I love his openness about his struggle with anxiety and depression. . Just a heads up, this book has a lot of F words. Like, a lot of F words. But listening to Wil Wheaton tell his story was so touching that I pressed forward. Your mileage may vary.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    I am in awe of and admire Wil for his ability and willingness to speak and write about childhood parental trauma and abuse, mental health and therapy, and about learning, changing, and evolving. He is able to speak to, and for, those of us with similar experiences who can’t communicate like he can. We see him and he sees us. I am beyond delighted that Star Trek and Star Trek Picard finally got it right for Wesley Crusher and Wil Wheaton and righted some of the wrongs.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Randy Kays

    I really like Wil Wheaton (starting with that is probably not a good thing). I listened to the audio book. It is over 20 hours long! This first half of the book is Wil annotating his book “Just a Geek”. The second half he annotated a bunch of stuff he has written since. I am 67 years old. If I was to annotate my diary I did not write when I was 29 years old in 1984, I sure I would be horrified. It is not surprising that Wil was horrified by what he wrote when he was 29. So, he says so. Alot. And I really like Wil Wheaton (starting with that is probably not a good thing). I listened to the audio book. It is over 20 hours long! This first half of the book is Wil annotating his book “Just a Geek”. The second half he annotated a bunch of stuff he has written since. I am 67 years old. If I was to annotate my diary I did not write when I was 29 years old in 1984, I sure I would be horrified. It is not surprising that Wil was horrified by what he wrote when he was 29. So, he says so. Alot. And repeatedly. Too much. My problem here is not that he apologized for being a jerk at age 29 (I think he could have given himself a break), his unforgivable sin was that he kept repeating his horror and disgust over, over, and over. The other thing is he has some serious issues with his parents, which he talks about alot. For good reasons, he is seriously pissed off. This is just me, but I didn't really want to hear how angry he is at his parents, again, and again, and again. I really struggled with whether to stop reading or not. I didn’t have read this stuff, but the other stuff was really good. The second half of the 20 hours book (20 hours, really?) was much better, less horror at himself and less ranting about his parents. Except, the section about the movie “The Curse”, trigger warning about child abuse, that section is really rough. In the audio book, his unrestrained emotional response to this section is hard to take. It is good, but hard to listen to. He does do some really fun stuff, like his pretend argument with his editor. I suspect his foot notes on his footnotes on his footnotes will really annoy people, but I liked it. In the audio book he takes it to another level by adding audio only footnotes to the footnotes on the footnotes. He says that reading the book helped him deal with his issues. You hear that happen, as he read for 20 hours. Twenty hours! The best part of the book is to witness him learning to stop worrying and come to love Star Trek. In the end, I really struggled with this book. Was the good stuff worth his endless self-recriminations? Was the good stuff worth watching the horrible train wreck that is his relationship with his mom and dad? I don’t know, but I finished the book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kris Tyler

    It took me a few day to process this book before I could write my review. I have been a fan of WW since ST:TNG. Call it a middle school crush. He kinda fell out of my radar for several years until I started Following Jenny Lawson- The Bloggess. She wanted a picture of some other celebrity doing some task, but ended up with a picture of WW collating paper! It was genius and had me scouring the internet for more on WW. Then he showed up on Big Bang Theory, and my favorite SciFy network shows, then It took me a few day to process this book before I could write my review. I have been a fan of WW since ST:TNG. Call it a middle school crush. He kinda fell out of my radar for several years until I started Following Jenny Lawson- The Bloggess. She wanted a picture of some other celebrity doing some task, but ended up with a picture of WW collating paper! It was genius and had me scouring the internet for more on WW. Then he showed up on Big Bang Theory, and my favorite SciFy network shows, then he had his own SciFy network show…..I was in geek girl heaven! I knew from his blogging that he was thrown into acting by his parents. I knew he was a HUGE advocate for mental health awareness. I knew, from Facebook he was also an advocate for rescue animals. But this book… oh wow. It gave me a little anxiety. The depths of his sadness and fear and self-doubt were palpable. The fact that he has been overcoming all his traumatic experiences and healing himself is inspiring. The love he has for his chosen family is beautiful. The relationship with his TNG family which he welcomed back into his life is beautiful. The ferocity with which he discusses the de-stigmatization of mental health issues is admirable. He may not have had the fame and celebrity of some of his peers, but he did not allow the horrible fates of some of his other peers to happen to him. He seems to be in a very genuinely happy, balanced place. And that’s exactly what you would want for an “old friend.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    3.5 stars. I didn't read "Just a Geek," nor had I even heard of it prior to this one being released so on the plus side, I have not reached stalker level celebrity crush status. I have been a fan of Wil's since he stole my 12 year old heart when he starred in "Stand By Me." (Still my favorite movie!) So when I saw this was coming out, I immediately put it on my TBR list and recommended my library buy it - which they did! (It's the little things). This was not, however, an easy book to read on my 3.5 stars. I didn't read "Just a Geek," nor had I even heard of it prior to this one being released so on the plus side, I have not reached stalker level celebrity crush status. I have been a fan of Wil's since he stole my 12 year old heart when he starred in "Stand By Me." (Still my favorite movie!) So when I saw this was coming out, I immediately put it on my TBR list and recommended my library buy it - which they did! (It's the little things). This was not, however, an easy book to read on my Kindle. As others have said, you have to "pop up" the footnotes which was fine (or read them all at the end in which they don't make sense), but somehow this made the page count bounce all over the place and nowhere near linear. I finished the book on page 436 or 436 and was only 61% finished with it? It felt like a really slow read as a result. The content wasn't bad. Wil is going back and annotating the original version of this book, which I think more than anything was a tool for him to try to work through the trauma of his not becoming the A-list celebrity that was his mother's dream, not his, and nothing he ever did being good enough for his father coupled with second-guessing whether or not quitting Star Trek: TNG was the worst decision he ever made. (Still mad about how they wrote Wesley off). I imagine being a child star on a series as popular as Star Trek would be something that follows you for the rest of your life and I can see how that can go one of two ways depending on whether or not you had a positive or negative experience working on the show. There are a lot of repeating themes throughout the book, which he acknowledges. Some of them did become a bit tedious after awhile but as anyone who has gone through grief counseling knows, repetition is a big part of healing - of getting your heart and head on the same page. One thing is for sure, however, he sure does love his wife and kids! (Sadly, for my no longer 12 year old, but still smitten heart!)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe

    I don't enjoy memoirs generally, so why the hell so I keep picking them up? Well, this is an interesting concept, annotating one's published memoir. Brave enough to tell the world embarrassing incidents from your life, but I am particularly impressed by the courage it takes to stand up in front of the world and say you were wrong. Or sexist, or whatever. Because if we're good people we are trying to learn and improve and at least make different errors. But to point out this thing you wrote 20 ye I don't enjoy memoirs generally, so why the hell so I keep picking them up? Well, this is an interesting concept, annotating one's published memoir. Brave enough to tell the world embarrassing incidents from your life, but I am particularly impressed by the courage it takes to stand up in front of the world and say you were wrong. Or sexist, or whatever. Because if we're good people we are trying to learn and improve and at least make different errors. But to point out this thing you wrote 20 years ago that makes you cringe now, to acknowledge the cringing you experience, damn, that'shardcore. Where I, to take an example at random, read my former writing on anything other than books and then shred it, burn the shreds, and wash my eyes with bleach at the horror of it all, Wheaton instead offers complete apologies to the world at large. Not those fake "I'm sorry if you were offended" apologies that refuse to acknowledge the insult, let alone offer any sort of recompense or improvement plan; these are full-on and extensive examinations of fault and harm and humble plans. Good on you, Wheaton! You come across as a truly decent person. I still don't like memoirs, though. Library copy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Content was definitely five stars. I love Wil and I find him to be a super enjoyable, funny storyteller and appreciate his perspective as someone who has processed a rough childhood, depression, and anxiety. I found it to be a real challenge to read on the Kindle because of the interface with going in and out of the footnotes, so as a book that is entirely all about all the awesome footnotes, it definitely slowed down the pace and made it disjointed a bit going back-and-forth. I wish that I had Content was definitely five stars. I love Wil and I find him to be a super enjoyable, funny storyteller and appreciate his perspective as someone who has processed a rough childhood, depression, and anxiety. I found it to be a real challenge to read on the Kindle because of the interface with going in and out of the footnotes, so as a book that is entirely all about all the awesome footnotes, it definitely slowed down the pace and made it disjointed a bit going back-and-forth. I wish that I had done the audiobook version instead. I her the footnotes are integrated well for the audiobook. But I found myself laughing out loud so very many times and flew through the book because it was so enjoyable. It’s especially interesting to see someone revisit their work from so many years ago and see how they’ve changed the ways they think about the events and about their own processing of that. By its nature, it gets somewhat repetitive, but that never became a problem as a reader.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    You need to read this in regular book form and not as an eBook. There are a lot of annotations. A ton. Which is great cause the original text (written by a much younger Wil W) is not nearly as interesting as current older/wiser Wil. But the issue is that if you read it on an eBook you must click each footnote link to be taken to the annotation and it’s painful and slow. I originally tried the eBook. Gave up and got the book. It’s much better. Though the annotations are just as plentiful and don’ You need to read this in regular book form and not as an eBook. There are a lot of annotations. A ton. Which is great cause the original text (written by a much younger Wil W) is not nearly as interesting as current older/wiser Wil. But the issue is that if you read it on an eBook you must click each footnote link to be taken to the annotation and it’s painful and slow. I originally tried the eBook. Gave up and got the book. It’s much better. Though the annotations are just as plentiful and don’t make for the most quick reading either. You need to be prepared to read a little. Go down to the bottom of the page and read his thoughts. Go back up the page to read another few sentences and repeat. Each page in the 400+ book has 5 or so footnotes. So. It takes some time. But it’s worth it. I follow Wil W on Instagram and really like what he has to say in general. I think we could be friends should he ever decide to take me up on that offer. As I said, current Wil has evolved in the 20 years since the first book and I appreciated his comments that his former self made in terms of sounding sexist or homophobic or just generally younger and less aware of life. I would guess that most of us would have similar commentary should we have decided to write and publish a memoir 20 years ago. It was an interesting take on a memoir.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Contender for favorite book of the year. In my lifetime I’ve read a lot of memoirs and a lot of mental health books and I believe this is one of the most unique approaches to both I’ve ever read. I loved that Wheaton took his original memoir and annotated and added to it. I appreciated the insights about inappropriate behavior and gaslighting. I loved the transparency about mental health and childhood trauma. And I connected so much with the authenticity and growth. As a kid, I watched Star Trek, Contender for favorite book of the year. In my lifetime I’ve read a lot of memoirs and a lot of mental health books and I believe this is one of the most unique approaches to both I’ve ever read. I loved that Wheaton took his original memoir and annotated and added to it. I appreciated the insights about inappropriate behavior and gaslighting. I loved the transparency about mental health and childhood trauma. And I connected so much with the authenticity and growth. As a kid, I watched Star Trek, largely at first because of Wheaton and LeVar Burton. It gave me a place to escape when my world wasn’t so great and it wasn’t something I shared with anyone because none of my friends watched it. As an adult, I’m even more thankful for that show because without it and The Big Bang Theory’s Wil Wheaton, I don’t know if I’d have picked up this book. And I’m so glad I did. From the stories about women’s access to health care to the William Shatner anecdote, this book is an absolute must read (or must listen in my case).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Mero

    I was very excited when I heard this was coming on. I guess I wasn't paying close enough attention, because I thought this was a sequel of sorts to Just a Geek, not a reprinting of JAG with annotations. The original material itself is worthy of 5 stars, not counting all the bonus material this edition features. I found myself rolling my eyes every time Wil apologized for an old joke that would be deemed offensive today, and/or apologized for saying guys as it isn't gender neutral/inclusive of no I was very excited when I heard this was coming on. I guess I wasn't paying close enough attention, because I thought this was a sequel of sorts to Just a Geek, not a reprinting of JAG with annotations. The original material itself is worthy of 5 stars, not counting all the bonus material this edition features. I found myself rolling my eyes every time Wil apologized for an old joke that would be deemed offensive today, and/or apologized for saying guys as it isn't gender neutral/inclusive of non-binary people. Aside from that little nitpick there was a lot of material I wasn't already familiar with, my favorite being the story behind Wil's movie The Curse. I went with the audio book, so hearing Wil read these difficult parts and audibly cry added an extra weight.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    I enjoy most memoirs and autobiographies, especially if the author narrates the audiobook. I wasn't sure how an annotated memoir would work, especially in audiobook form, but clearly a lot of work has been done to make it easy to follow while listening. I didn't read Just A Geek, but this book makes it like two memoirs in one, and Wil's reflections on his younger self just adds depth to the entire thing. I enjoy most memoirs and autobiographies, especially if the author narrates the audiobook. I wasn't sure how an annotated memoir would work, especially in audiobook form, but clearly a lot of work has been done to make it easy to follow while listening. I didn't read Just A Geek, but this book makes it like two memoirs in one, and Wil's reflections on his younger self just adds depth to the entire thing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Case

    I'll admit to being a HUGE fanboy of Wil's - I've enjoyed his blog for years, I've enjoyed his other writings (the original form of this book included, pre-annotations), his acting work, and his audiobook work... and even with all of that in place, I never truly got the gravity of what all Wil was dealing with in his personal life. This memoir deals with some HEAVY topics - some fun too - but I truly think those that struggle to understand the life of celebrity, or even what people go through wi I'll admit to being a HUGE fanboy of Wil's - I've enjoyed his blog for years, I've enjoyed his other writings (the original form of this book included, pre-annotations), his acting work, and his audiobook work... and even with all of that in place, I never truly got the gravity of what all Wil was dealing with in his personal life. This memoir deals with some HEAVY topics - some fun too - but I truly think those that struggle to understand the life of celebrity, or even what people go through with anxiety and depression, could really stand to read this. I can't fathom weathering half of what Wil went through and turning out half as well-adjusted as he is today in 2022 (I don't know him personally, but he certainly has an online presence and have met at Conventions before). I can't recommend this book enough - whether you're a Star Trek or BBT fan or not, this is certainly worth the read. If you have the time and desire for an even MORE enjoyable experience with the book, I'd suggest listening to the audiobook, of which Wil himself is the narrator - and you get some special/extra bonuses.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian Tozzo

    Having only read through the first chapter and both introductions, and skimmed through various parts of this book, I have this advice for anyone who wants to read about Wil Wheaton. Read the footnotes. I know many people like to skip footnotes in books (and an autobiography) because they are usually boring, crude, and lack emotion. Not this book. Here the footnotes are the tasty morsals of tidbits of knowing who Wil Wheaton was and is today. They make you laugh, cry, and maybe even say I like th Having only read through the first chapter and both introductions, and skimmed through various parts of this book, I have this advice for anyone who wants to read about Wil Wheaton. Read the footnotes. I know many people like to skip footnotes in books (and an autobiography) because they are usually boring, crude, and lack emotion. Not this book. Here the footnotes are the tasty morsals of tidbits of knowing who Wil Wheaton was and is today. They make you laugh, cry, and maybe even say I like this guy. Yes there are many references to how badly his parents treated him as a child, but here he realizes that as a former child actor, he has beaten the odds and become the success he is today. Maybe not the kind of successful movie actor his parents wanted to him to be, but maybe thats not a bad thing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alyce Caswell

    I didn't realise how badly I needed to read this until I read it. Absolutely invaluable to any creative person who A) has depression and/or B) is having difficulty with letting go of a preoccupation with external sources of validation/success. Sure, this memoir drags a bit towards the end, but I can't give it any less than five stars. Side note: As a tween in the early 2000s on the Internet, the first place I ever heard about Wil Wheaton was on a forum where people were linking to his blog. I had I didn't realise how badly I needed to read this until I read it. Absolutely invaluable to any creative person who A) has depression and/or B) is having difficulty with letting go of a preoccupation with external sources of validation/success. Sure, this memoir drags a bit towards the end, but I can't give it any less than five stars. Side note: As a tween in the early 2000s on the Internet, the first place I ever heard about Wil Wheaton was on a forum where people were linking to his blog. I had never watched any version of Star Trek by that point. So to me, he has always been a writer before all else - and I still immensely enjoy reading his words.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Wil takes an unflinching look at his past writing (Both Just a Geek and other writings) with an honest look at himself and his life. Worth reading if you’re a fan of Wil from whatever you know him from.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rusty Ray Guns

    This was very well written deeply interesting and incredibly moving. I suffer from the same diagnosed metal illnesses as will and seeing him truthfully talk so openly about it was very important for me to read as well as very hard and triggering at points . the unique approach from my experience of this book of him reading and talking about this previous book is really interesting and shows not just his life and amazing story's in shows but also his growth as a write and human . Brilliant and rea This was very well written deeply interesting and incredibly moving. I suffer from the same diagnosed metal illnesses as will and seeing him truthfully talk so openly about it was very important for me to read as well as very hard and triggering at points . the unique approach from my experience of this book of him reading and talking about this previous book is really interesting and shows not just his life and amazing story's in shows but also his growth as a write and human . Brilliant and really interesting human. Thanks for making me cry Will .

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This was one of the most therapeutic books I've ever read. Will's parents were abusive to him in very similar ways to how my mother was abusive to me and I found him talking about his experiences and dealing with that trauma so helpful. It was insightful and funny. It shows how much people can grow. How to reflect on our own experiences and come out stronger and happier. Highly recommended. This was one of the most therapeutic books I've ever read. Will's parents were abusive to him in very similar ways to how my mother was abusive to me and I found him talking about his experiences and dealing with that trauma so helpful. It was insightful and funny. It shows how much people can grow. How to reflect on our own experiences and come out stronger and happier. Highly recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    BookStarRaven

    Quick Take: Will Wheaton counsels his past self by annotating a memoir he wrote in his 20’s. Still Just a Geek is Will Wheaton’s emotional annotations on his original memoir “Just a Geek.” Just a Geek was written in 2009 when he was in his late 20’s. In 2022, Wheaton, almost 50, decided to annotate his past memoir based on the wisdom and experience he has today. I decided to read this book because I’ve been a huge Star Trek fan since I was a kid. I consider myself a Trekkie and love to rewatch ol Quick Take: Will Wheaton counsels his past self by annotating a memoir he wrote in his 20’s. Still Just a Geek is Will Wheaton’s emotional annotations on his original memoir “Just a Geek.” Just a Geek was written in 2009 when he was in his late 20’s. In 2022, Wheaton, almost 50, decided to annotate his past memoir based on the wisdom and experience he has today. I decided to read this book because I’ve been a huge Star Trek fan since I was a kid. I consider myself a Trekkie and love to rewatch old episodes of The Next Generation. I have mixed feelings about the memoir. On the one hand, there were so many good things I appreciated. Wheaton was honest, authentic and had many wise things to share. In a sense, I felt like Will Wheaton was mentoring me. On the other hand, many of the parts were long and repetitive and dragged on. I listened to this on audiobook, and it was 25 hours long! That being said, I would still recommend the audiobook, given you get to hear everything read by Will Wheaton himself. Wheaton’s openness is refreshing. He talks about his struggles with self-doubt, depression, and anxiety as well as the abuse and gaslighting he received from both of his parents. The relationship with his parents clearly drove his decisions for many years of his life and I appreciated his openness to reevaluate his personal lens. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Will Wheaton’s sense of humor or is a Star Trek fan. I’m glad I heard his story. Any other Star Trek fans out there excited to read this? Rating: 4/5 Genre: auto-biography/essays Check it out on Instagram HERE!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    I wish I could say I loved this book, but I’m not sure it’s meant to be loved. It’s definitely meant to be revealing, apologetic, and educational, but loved… not so much. Like others, I’m skipping the star rating on this book because I think it falls into two camps. ----- Five stars: I love WW and this book taught me more about him and made me think about my own life. ----- One star: WTH? All he does is repeatedly whine about his past mistakes and how hard his life has been. Personally, I fall into I wish I could say I loved this book, but I’m not sure it’s meant to be loved. It’s definitely meant to be revealing, apologetic, and educational, but loved… not so much. Like others, I’m skipping the star rating on this book because I think it falls into two camps. ----- Five stars: I love WW and this book taught me more about him and made me think about my own life. ----- One star: WTH? All he does is repeatedly whine about his past mistakes and how hard his life has been. Personally, I fall into the five-star camp. I’m a fan of Wheaton, and I find his reflection on his own life engaging because it has caused me to reflect on my own life, actions, and dreams. I have one significant wish for this book: I wish he had made one apology for the objectification of women he calls out in his annotations and one apology each for the other bad examples he set in the original, like his use of the word lame. Then, each time one of those incidents occurred, he could have simply annotated, “see apology #1.” The repetitiveness of the apologies wore on me. That said, being his age, I’ve had similar growth experiences with those types of things, but I don’t have a book, blog, or journal to look back on and feel embarrassment. I would cringe too if I remembered my own behavior as clearly as he can read his. Reading this made me want to send him fan mail. I’m going to skip that because every time I’ve tried to engage with him online or on social media, I look back at what I wrote and think, “Wow! I’m a moron.” or “Well, those words don’t say what I thought they said.” At one point in the book, I started to wonder if his perception of his parents was really accurate. It seems over the top. I wanted to know their side of the story, and then he got to the part about how they handled his money, and I thought, “Damn! That’s awful.” Then I got to the end and the story of the production of The Curse and changed my thinking to, “Holy shit! Their side of the story doesn’t matter.” As a father and husband to family who suffer from anxiety and depression, his descriptions of how it feels and how it affects your behavior are meaningful. I’m lucky to not have those ailments, so I’ve always struggled to understand. I wish he’d talked a bit more about Cognitive Behavior Therapy. For me, his candidness around his depression and anxiety are incredibly valuable. Thank you, Mr. Wheaton. Finally, if you are new to Wil Wheaton, find his fiction or his other books, like Dancing Barefoot or Dead Trees Give No Shelter. He is a great writer. I’d like him to write more. Oh, one last note, if you read the physical or Kindle version or are just considering this book, the audio version is the definitive version. I read the Kindle version while I listened to the audio. The emotion in his narration made a huge impression and sometimes changed how I interpreted the text. Plus, he has several additional impromptu annotations that were added as he read the book for Audible.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Non

    Still Just a Geek is like "the Inception of inner child work." If only we all had the capacity to look back at the past versions of ourselves with such empathy and curiosity. Listen to my chat with Wil about Still Just a Geek on You, Me, Empathy: https://feelyhuman.co/episodes/wil-wh... Still Just a Geek is like "the Inception of inner child work." If only we all had the capacity to look back at the past versions of ourselves with such empathy and curiosity. Listen to my chat with Wil about Still Just a Geek on You, Me, Empathy: https://feelyhuman.co/episodes/wil-wh...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Highly entertaining and great insight into his life. I like how candid he is about his journey to where he is today. *Does contain a lot of strong language.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Berni Phillips

    I would not recommend this book. It is an overly footnooted vanity piece. Evidently, some decades ago he published "Just a Geek," which was a story of mostly his struggles as an actor after leaving Star Trek: the Next Generation. He complains that people called this whiny, but it is. He has gone back and excessively footnoted this book, which makes up half of this book. It was an embarrassment to read. Rather than annotate it (many times a page in most cases) to show how he has matured, he should I would not recommend this book. It is an overly footnooted vanity piece. Evidently, some decades ago he published "Just a Geek," which was a story of mostly his struggles as an actor after leaving Star Trek: the Next Generation. He complains that people called this whiny, but it is. He has gone back and excessively footnoted this book, which makes up half of this book. It was an embarrassment to read. Rather than annotate it (many times a page in most cases) to show how he has matured, he should have just let it sink into well-deserved oblivion. I watched St:NG when it was new. I didn't care for his character on the show. That wasn't his fault, it was the writers. I did enjoy his appearances on Big Bang Theory, playing a fictionalized version of himself. (He served as nemesis to Sheldon, one of the main characters.) I also like his narrations on John Scalzi's audio books. He's a good voice actor. I don't think he's a good writer. I can't imagine why they published this. Many of the annotations are repetitious exchanges with his editor who objects to Wheaton's constant use of the word, "cool." If you do read this, I would recommend skipping the whole "Just a Geek" and starting in the second part with the essay about his wife's medical emergency. Even the later sections have far too many unnecessary footnotes. They became really, really annoying, disrupting the text and making it feel choppier than necessary. I finally stopped reading the footnotes and it was a much smoother read. I would also skip the speeches, which cover things he had spoken of previously. And the appendices which are also embarrassing. I would like my money back. Don't waste yours.

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