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Things That Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life

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Discover practical steps you can take today to live a life focused on things that matter, from the bestselling author of The More of Less and The Minimalist Home. "Things That Matter points the way to free ourselves from the distractions of everyday life so that we can build the lives we seek to create."--Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project Do you want to li Discover practical steps you can take today to live a life focused on things that matter, from the bestselling author of The More of Less and The Minimalist Home. "Things That Matter points the way to free ourselves from the distractions of everyday life so that we can build the lives we seek to create."--Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project Do you want to live a meaningful life--with very few regrets--and make a positive difference in the world? But is culture distracting you from doing so? Perhaps moments, days, and years go by without you stopping to ask yourself, Am I living out my true purpose? Even if that question whispers to you, are you brushing it aside because you don't know what to change in life's busyness? In Things That Matter, Joshua Becker helps you identify the obstacles--such as fear, technology, money, possessions, and the opinions of others--that keep you from living with intention, and then he provides practical ideas for letting go of those distractions today so you can focus on what matters most. He uses practical exercises and questions, insights from a nationwide survey, and success stories to give you the motivation you need to - identify the pursuits that matter most to you - align your dreams with your daily priorities - recognize how money and possessions keep you from happiness - become aware of how others' opinions of you influence your choices - embrace what you're truly passionate about instead of planning that next escape - figure out what to do with all those emails, notifications, and pings - let go of past mistakes and debilitating habits Things That Matter is a book about living well. It's about overcoming the chatter of a world focused on all the wrong things. It's about rethinking the common assumptions of today to find satisfaction and fulfillment tomorrow. How do we get to the end of our lives with minimal regrets? We set aside lesser pursuits to seek lasting meaning. And we discover the joy of doing it every day.


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Discover practical steps you can take today to live a life focused on things that matter, from the bestselling author of The More of Less and The Minimalist Home. "Things That Matter points the way to free ourselves from the distractions of everyday life so that we can build the lives we seek to create."--Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project Do you want to li Discover practical steps you can take today to live a life focused on things that matter, from the bestselling author of The More of Less and The Minimalist Home. "Things That Matter points the way to free ourselves from the distractions of everyday life so that we can build the lives we seek to create."--Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project Do you want to live a meaningful life--with very few regrets--and make a positive difference in the world? But is culture distracting you from doing so? Perhaps moments, days, and years go by without you stopping to ask yourself, Am I living out my true purpose? Even if that question whispers to you, are you brushing it aside because you don't know what to change in life's busyness? In Things That Matter, Joshua Becker helps you identify the obstacles--such as fear, technology, money, possessions, and the opinions of others--that keep you from living with intention, and then he provides practical ideas for letting go of those distractions today so you can focus on what matters most. He uses practical exercises and questions, insights from a nationwide survey, and success stories to give you the motivation you need to - identify the pursuits that matter most to you - align your dreams with your daily priorities - recognize how money and possessions keep you from happiness - become aware of how others' opinions of you influence your choices - embrace what you're truly passionate about instead of planning that next escape - figure out what to do with all those emails, notifications, and pings - let go of past mistakes and debilitating habits Things That Matter is a book about living well. It's about overcoming the chatter of a world focused on all the wrong things. It's about rethinking the common assumptions of today to find satisfaction and fulfillment tomorrow. How do we get to the end of our lives with minimal regrets? We set aside lesser pursuits to seek lasting meaning. And we discover the joy of doing it every day.

30 review for Things That Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen Juenke

    As I am reading a book, I often wonder who is the author writing for. When I was reading the book, I nodded along at many points in the beginning of the book. Then we got to the work section. The author goes into detail about how we all should be loving our work. WE should work for our passion. I think this is out of touch with reality. So many of us work because we HAVE to. We HAVE to work to make a living. If everyone did their passion, we would not have custodians, housekeepers, etc. Then the a As I am reading a book, I often wonder who is the author writing for. When I was reading the book, I nodded along at many points in the beginning of the book. Then we got to the work section. The author goes into detail about how we all should be loving our work. WE should work for our passion. I think this is out of touch with reality. So many of us work because we HAVE to. We HAVE to work to make a living. If everyone did their passion, we would not have custodians, housekeepers, etc. Then the author states DO NOT RETIRE! Wait! WHAT?! yep, stay in the workforce till you die, nothing wrong with that. LETS FULL STOP RIGHT THERE! The author neglects to state that the majority of people CAN"T work till they die. MOST people are forced out of the work force because of health reasons. At this point in the book, I really had to wonder WHO was the author talking to. He went further....maybe you have OVERSAVED for retirement. When Americans are barely saving for retirement...to make that statement is really dangerous. His point tied to this was that we should give out $5 a week to a charity of our choice to see if we still have a roof over our heads, food in our belly. then to up the donation every week. It was very hard to take the author seriously when he seemed to contradict himself in just about everything that he wrote. Overall, I would be cautious to give this book to anyone to read without a firm grasp of the realities facing many Americans today. Thank you to Netgalley and to the publisher for allowing me this ARC in exchange for this honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Hudock

    Joshua Becker has been writing about minimalism and intentional living for over 10 years. He has written on his blog as well as several previous books and I have followed him most of that time. This book expands beyond minimizing possessions to the important topic of living an intentional, meaningful life. He shows that minimizing possessions is a means, not an end in itself. He also writes about the distractions of life, such as leisure, possessions, money, technology and happiness, which can h Joshua Becker has been writing about minimalism and intentional living for over 10 years. He has written on his blog as well as several previous books and I have followed him most of that time. This book expands beyond minimizing possessions to the important topic of living an intentional, meaningful life. He shows that minimizing possessions is a means, not an end in itself. He also writes about the distractions of life, such as leisure, possessions, money, technology and happiness, which can hinder people from pursuing their higher purposes. The book has chapters that take a deep dive in each of these areas to help the reader reduce some of these distractions. The final chapter is encouragement to discover the meaning and purpose in the reader's live and then pursue that. As someone who is on the path to living in a simpler way and trying to find more meaning in life, I very much enjoyed this book. I recommend it to anyone who is feeling overwhelmed in any aspect of their lives for good ideas of how to reduce is and do more of what they want. I received a complementary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vannetta Chapman

    I'm a big fan of Joshua Becker having taken one of his minimalism courses, so I expected to enjoy this book. I was surprised to find that not only did I enjoy it, but I found it to be very applicable. Joshua manages to take a concept that most would agree with (we'd all like our lives to count for something, to make a difference in some small way) and show how you can define those goals, remove the distractions, and progress toward those goals. The chapters that helped me the most was the section I'm a big fan of Joshua Becker having taken one of his minimalism courses, so I expected to enjoy this book. I was surprised to find that not only did I enjoy it, but I found it to be very applicable. Joshua manages to take a concept that most would agree with (we'd all like our lives to count for something, to make a difference in some small way) and show how you can define those goals, remove the distractions, and progress toward those goals. The chapters that helped me the most was the section on fear (that was a big surprise) and the prevalence of digital distractions (not a surprise, but still super helpful). Highly recommend. Note: Joshua was previously a pastor and has a strong faith background, but this book would be helpful to anyone, regardless where they are in their faith journey.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shani Williams

    This is the first book that I’ve read by Joshua and it’ll be the last book that I’ll read by Joshua. I don’t know what reality this man is living, but it must not be this one. The section on money I found offensive. This man told us if you have more money than someone else then you’re not struggling. And if you pursue money you’re greedy. According to him, people over save for rainy days that will never happen, you don’t need retirement saving just work til you die and then if you can afford to This is the first book that I’ve read by Joshua and it’ll be the last book that I’ll read by Joshua. I don’t know what reality this man is living, but it must not be this one. The section on money I found offensive. This man told us if you have more money than someone else then you’re not struggling. And if you pursue money you’re greedy. According to him, people over save for rainy days that will never happen, you don’t need retirement saving just work til you die and then if you can afford to donate five dollars a week and still have food on your table when you’re fine. This book wasn’t written for the average person. Even though Americans have more money than a lot of the world this country is capitalistic, struggling with inflation and we’re paying double the amount that we used to pay for things. People are losing their homes because rent is doubling and tripling in areas, people can’t afford their medicine, gas prices are crazy and a lot of people can no longer afford food. This is advice is easy for him to give considering he’s a millionaire and he seems to forget that most Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Holly G

    I really enjoyed this book, and I can say there are a lot of small moments of wisdom that really snuck up on me. The author is willing to use himself as an example in ways that make his points even more accessible and human. The chapters on money and finances are really wonderful, and they contain the kinds of reminders I will return to frequently. Becker shares a lot about himself without making it about him, and this is a rare skill for an author. I was happy to have a chance to read the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    Wonderful book about what really matters in life, not material things but relationships

  7. 4 out of 5

    kinereads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. - i took a good chunk of notes while reading this, and i think they’ll be helpful - i want to say that this book is so straightforward and organized, i like how the chapters are done - this was an easy but helpful read, it made me think twice about some things - many great tips, and i liked that they were quite easy to understand - this will definitely be a book i will visit back and forth, because there was definitely things that i think i would like to adapt and keep on reminding myself from time - i took a good chunk of notes while reading this, and i think they’ll be helpful - i want to say that this book is so straightforward and organized, i like how the chapters are done - this was an easy but helpful read, it made me think twice about some things - many great tips, and i liked that they were quite easy to understand - this will definitely be a book i will visit back and forth, because there was definitely things that i think i would like to adapt and keep on reminding myself from time to time - motivating - i would highly recommend this book if you’re looking for some wisdom and to get a newer perspective on life maybe?? honestly it was great and i’m really glad i read it, because i’m not the person to read a lot of self help books!! I really liked this “When a distraction becomes a lifestyle, we lose control over the life we are living” 🤍

  8. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Capeci

    Ever since reading Joshua Becker’s first book, The More of Less, I’ve continued to follow his blog and social media posts. His is a voice I’ve learned to trust. So when I had a chance to read Things That Matter, I jumped on it. The book doesn’t disappoint: it’s an easy read, yet thought provoking. I chose to take it a chapter every day or two, and examine each of the distractions he outlines to see which ones I need to work on most in order to live a life that truly matters, a life with few regr Ever since reading Joshua Becker’s first book, The More of Less, I’ve continued to follow his blog and social media posts. His is a voice I’ve learned to trust. So when I had a chance to read Things That Matter, I jumped on it. The book doesn’t disappoint: it’s an easy read, yet thought provoking. I chose to take it a chapter every day or two, and examine each of the distractions he outlines to see which ones I need to work on most in order to live a life that truly matters, a life with few regrets. I’ve got a long way to go, but the examples and encouragement he provides demonstrate it’s possible and worth the effort. Do yourself a favor. Read Things That Matter. You won’t regret it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    It is said that a car delaer is capable of selling anyone a car. It is the good dealer who is able to sell someone multiple cars. To do that, service has to be grand. How many cars have you purchased from the same dealer? I've read Becker before. I watch his YouTube video every Friday. Generally, I have a good impression of him. I invested in this book. I won't buy another. My 119 notes are public. Take exception with them all you want. There was absolutely nothing of substance at all here for me. It is said that a car delaer is capable of selling anyone a car. It is the good dealer who is able to sell someone multiple cars. To do that, service has to be grand. How many cars have you purchased from the same dealer? I've read Becker before. I watch his YouTube video every Friday. Generally, I have a good impression of him. I invested in this book. I won't buy another. My 119 notes are public. Take exception with them all you want. There was absolutely nothing of substance at all here for me. Time and time again his points contradicted a point that was previously made. It seemed like Becker has this POV and he is incapable of seeing that not everyone approaches these topics in the same manner he does. What I took away is that Becker is full of pride and judgment. I found that surprising. Constantly, Becker spoke of better decisions, better paths, more of this and more of that. I found it offputting. It all seemed to roll into wanting to be on one's deathbed and then feel proud of the choices he made to get there. I get it, but take a far different path. I relish that I am. I get to be. Behold what life has provided me. That is enough. My choices are my choices. What I find valuable/meaningful today may be folly tomorrow. But I still am. That is what matters to me. I'll continue to watch, I suspect, the Friday YouTube video. I'll read a blog post here and there. But I'll never spend another penny in this ecosystem.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paulette

    I have followed Josh, read his books, and read his newsletter. Agree with him mostly, and although this was a decent book, it just didn't hit me hard or motivate me, move me, or inspire me in any way. Lots of good stories about the changes minimalism effected in their lives but seemed far from me. I don't want to get rid of all my stuff and travel. I like staying home with my hobbies!! I have followed Josh, read his books, and read his newsletter. Agree with him mostly, and although this was a decent book, it just didn't hit me hard or motivate me, move me, or inspire me in any way. Lots of good stories about the changes minimalism effected in their lives but seemed far from me. I don't want to get rid of all my stuff and travel. I like staying home with my hobbies!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Sumlar

    This was my first book by this author. At first glance I thought the ideas weren’t anything I hadn’t heard and considered before, but then the author added questions for consideration at the end of each chapter and I realized that I while I may have *thought* the idea wasn’t new to me, I clearly was not living in alignment with my values in several areas. It definitely provoked a lot of careful re-evaluation. The book was a light read and set up in a way to make it easy to read a bit, think on it This was my first book by this author. At first glance I thought the ideas weren’t anything I hadn’t heard and considered before, but then the author added questions for consideration at the end of each chapter and I realized that I while I may have *thought* the idea wasn’t new to me, I clearly was not living in alignment with my values in several areas. It definitely provoked a lot of careful re-evaluation. The book was a light read and set up in a way to make it easy to read a bit, think on it and come back. Although the author and I disagree with some underlying perspectives in certain areas, I still found the book approachable and was able to pick up applicable insights from it. Thank you to the publisher for providing an ARC to review through NetGalley

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marlene Linkhart

    The publisher provided a copy for review. Joshua Becker has been an inspiration since 2016 when I took his first “Uncluttered Course”. His teaching and words changed my way of living. Things That Matter, rises from minimalism to a discovery in purposeful living. Becker offers a guide in self-awareness revealing and tying our gifts, values and passions toward an intentional life. Reducing the distractions, honing in on what matters offer insight and wisdom into unveiling the meaningful. Becker con The publisher provided a copy for review. Joshua Becker has been an inspiration since 2016 when I took his first “Uncluttered Course”. His teaching and words changed my way of living. Things That Matter, rises from minimalism to a discovery in purposeful living. Becker offers a guide in self-awareness revealing and tying our gifts, values and passions toward an intentional life. Reducing the distractions, honing in on what matters offer insight and wisdom into unveiling the meaningful. Becker continues to guide us into the exploration of ‘what’s enough’ while posing questions to deepen our connection to ourselves, to others and to the world. Things That Matter, is another great read and powerful way to rethink and recommit to what matters in our lives. May you too be inspired by his latest book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Edgerly

    This book was absolutely excellent. I will be honest, I am NOT one to finish books. When I initially signed up to read this book in exchange for a review, I was a little nervous that I may not be able to finish it (I have three young kids and have been working a lot, needless to say, my spare time has been limited!). I can honestly say that this book was so good I actually looked forward to reading it every night while I was putting my kids down for bed. Joshua has done an outstanding job articu This book was absolutely excellent. I will be honest, I am NOT one to finish books. When I initially signed up to read this book in exchange for a review, I was a little nervous that I may not be able to finish it (I have three young kids and have been working a lot, needless to say, my spare time has been limited!). I can honestly say that this book was so good I actually looked forward to reading it every night while I was putting my kids down for bed. Joshua has done an outstanding job articulating his thoughts in this book. As I read it, one thought kept continually coming to my mind - these are the same things I have been thinking over and over for the past few years but have never been able to put into words. I could see how some people might say this stuff is the stuff we already know but don’t put into action. While that’s true, the way in which he communicates these ideas and values is what makes this book so great. He talks about all of the things that distracts us and takes away from our life even when we think those things are adding to it… the truth is, they aren’t. This book helps you open your eyes to see the truth behind the distractions. It gives you the tools you need to start living a life of purpose and meaning. To quote the author, “You don’t have to live like everyone else. In fact, you’ll probably be happier if you don’t.” This book has truly changed the way I view my life and as a result, I have begun to make changes that have positively impacted myself, my family, and my friends - hopefully soon those changes will begin to impact those I don’t even know as well. One of my favorite ideas he imparts is living in a way that builds up the people around you instead trying to build yourself up - because if you do live that way, you will naturally build yourself up in the process but it’s done in a way that brings recognition to others instead. It’s such a simple concept but he presents it in a way that makes it safe to lose the pull to look out for our own interests first. We live in a very me centered culture. This book pushes you to live your life outside of yourself. To see the greater purpose in all of it. I cannot recommend this book enough (and I don’t say that lightly). This is one that I will be personally purchasing for myself to read again in the future, as well as for my husband and other family members. Well done, Joshua. Your words and wisdom are greatly needed and I truly believe that this book will make a positive impact in the world. This book is definitely worth your time and I cannot recommend it enough. Do yourself a favor and buy the book. You’ll be happy you did.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    Things That Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life by Joshua Becker Published April 19th 2022 <3 Chapter #7 made this well worth the read/listen. #HD #CD Do you want to live a meaningful life—with very few regrets—and make a positive difference in the world? But is culture distracting you from doing so? Perhaps moments, days, and years go by without you stopping to ask yourself, Am I living out my true purpose? Even if that question whispers to you, are you brushing it as Things That Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life by Joshua Becker Published April 19th 2022 <3 Chapter #7 made this well worth the read/listen. #HD #CD Do you want to live a meaningful life—with very few regrets—and make a positive difference in the world? But is culture distracting you from doing so? Perhaps moments, days, and years go by without you stopping to ask yourself, Am I living out my true purpose? Even if that question whispers to you, are you brushing it aside because you don’t know what to change in life’s busyness? In Things That Matter, Joshua Becker helps you identify the obstacles—such as fear, technology, money, possessions, and the opinions of others—that keep you from living with intention, and then he provides practical ideas for letting go of those distractions today so you can focus on what matters most. He uses practical exercises and questions, insights from a nationwide survey, and success stories to give you the motivation you need to • identify the pursuits that matter most to you • align your dreams with your daily priorities • recognize how money and possessions keep you from happiness • become aware of how others’ opinions of you influence your choices • embrace what you’re truly passionate about instead of planning that next escape • figure out what to do with all those emails, notifications, and pings • let go of past mistakes and debilitating habits Things That Matter is a book about living well. It’s about overcoming the chatter of a world focused on all the wrong things. It’s about rethinking the common assumptions of today to find satisfaction and fulfillment tomorrow. How do we get to the end of our lives with minimal regrets? We set aside lesser pursuits to seek lasting meaning. And we discover the joy of doing it every day.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gail Williamson

    4.75stars #JoshuaBecker's book is so much more than removing physical and mental clutter (his established expertise), it is about looking within for those unsatisfied places we hide to the public but more importantly to ourselves. It is not only about living with less (less house, less distraction, less fear) but about finding more - of ourselves. He suggests 'making choices to take you off the path of the ordinary and onto the path of intentionality'. He call you to be brave, to confront your fea 4.75stars #JoshuaBecker's book is so much more than removing physical and mental clutter (his established expertise), it is about looking within for those unsatisfied places we hide to the public but more importantly to ourselves. It is not only about living with less (less house, less distraction, less fear) but about finding more - of ourselves. He suggests 'making choices to take you off the path of the ordinary and onto the path of intentionality'. He call you to be brave, to confront your fears of feeling anxious in the unknown, and to not let past mistakes hold you back to try again. Becker reminds us to be selfless in our pursuit for contribution, to not horde our wealth/time/creativitiy for later use as the time we have is limited. And we don't know how much we have of it to spend on fruitless activities. Keep faith with the important things in your life - family, service, talents/skills. One of the key points that reached me was our propensity to let our distraction (ie. catch up on a series on television) become our lifestyle. We all have either experienced or have been witness to the 'binge'. A helpful, valuable book to digest, ponder and study for its merits. Who among us does not want a fulfilling life? #ThingsThatMatter refers to being a consumer or a contributor. It is easy to be a consumer, it is passive, it passes the time, watch, scroll, click. It takes spirit, commitment and agency to be a contributor. Being a contributor builds bridges, creates community, and leaves a legacy. In spite of the depth of the words found in this book, it is still an easy read meant for all. I also appreciated the extensive list of acknowlegments that were included. Bravo to Becker for the authenticity which appears to be a tad more rare these days with other authors. A highly recommend this book and thank #NetGalley and #WaterBrook&Multnomah for the opportunity to read an advance copy for my review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Life is long if you know how to use it. Choose well. Set aside lesser pursuits to seek meaning in your life. Do this every single day. Sometimes you just have to jump without hesitation. Live life on purpose. No more time to waste. Run toward the problem. Everyone is minimalizing something, whether it is possessions, money, time or potential. Everything is either a trophy, a toy or a tool. First own less, then want less. Live your mission for the purpose not the praise. The goal of work isn't more rest. Life is long if you know how to use it. Choose well. Set aside lesser pursuits to seek meaning in your life. Do this every single day. Sometimes you just have to jump without hesitation. Live life on purpose. No more time to waste. Run toward the problem. Everyone is minimalizing something, whether it is possessions, money, time or potential. Everything is either a trophy, a toy or a tool. First own less, then want less. Live your mission for the purpose not the praise. The goal of work isn't more rest. The goal of rest is better work. The goal of work is for purpose not to amass a nest egg to retire. Technology can quickly move from tool to toy to distraction. What do you want to have control of your time and your attention? You don't have to live like everyone else. You will be happier if you don't.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Convicting in a non-accusatory way. The goal is not just decluttering, but getting rid of all kinds of distractions (pursuit of money, reputation, technology and more) in order to make room in your LIFE for the great, instead of just the good. A higher focus — to allow us to give to the world; the world needs the things that only our unique selves can give, and we can’t give them properly when we’re distracted by the lesser things in life. Yes, we have daily practical things that need to be done Convicting in a non-accusatory way. The goal is not just decluttering, but getting rid of all kinds of distractions (pursuit of money, reputation, technology and more) in order to make room in your LIFE for the great, instead of just the good. A higher focus — to allow us to give to the world; the world needs the things that only our unique selves can give, and we can’t give them properly when we’re distracted by the lesser things in life. Yes, we have daily practical things that need to be done, but focusing on things that matter helps us to make the most of the rest of our time. A clearly presented, practical approach. Very inspiring!

  18. 5 out of 5

    M

    For one of those cliche self-help books, this was actually pretty good. There was real justification for action with good methods for unplugging and re-engaging to and with people and achievements that matter. It was good to read this, to put 'life' into perspective. Even if you know or practice most of what's in this book already, it is a good reference text that can realign, reassure or remind you about what is important to you. Quite interesting! For one of those cliche self-help books, this was actually pretty good. There was real justification for action with good methods for unplugging and re-engaging to and with people and achievements that matter. It was good to read this, to put 'life' into perspective. Even if you know or practice most of what's in this book already, it is a good reference text that can realign, reassure or remind you about what is important to you. Quite interesting!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yahya Alshukri

    An interesting read. I like how Joshua describes some of life conundrum "distractions". Although, at first, seems his views are based on religious, his thinking is driving by logical minimalism. The book is well structured. Joshua acknowledges that there are different types of distractions; some based on our objectives in life, some based physiological reasoning (Fear, past mistake,,), and other that are based on leisures (happiness, money, possessions, applause,,) I am inspired by this reading bu An interesting read. I like how Joshua describes some of life conundrum "distractions". Although, at first, seems his views are based on religious, his thinking is driving by logical minimalism. The book is well structured. Joshua acknowledges that there are different types of distractions; some based on our objectives in life, some based physiological reasoning (Fear, past mistake,,), and other that are based on leisures (happiness, money, possessions, applause,,) I am inspired by this reading but still facing an intimate dilemma regarding "meaningful life purposes". How can we define the meaningful in human life? Isn't our own existence a meaningful thing by itself? While I respects Joshua definition and his take on "Meaningful life" as well as his volunteering work for the disadvantage, I still have to understand it completely. I would really love to read his book in minimalism.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Schmidt

    This book takes you beyond simple living to identifying and living out your purpose. It was more than I expected. Thank you Joshua Becker.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charly Troff (ReaderTurnedWriter)

    Great reminders to focus on the most important things in life and how to do it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Diulus

    As the title suggests this book offers opinions by the author through easy to read chapters based on real life examples of his own and other people's about things that matter in life. I really enjoyed the stories he included to make the concepts he introduces so relatable to me as a reader. If you're familiar with the author's other works, you know he's a fan of minimalism and seeks to inspire others "to pursue their passions while owning fewer possessions." That sentiment influences this book g As the title suggests this book offers opinions by the author through easy to read chapters based on real life examples of his own and other people's about things that matter in life. I really enjoyed the stories he included to make the concepts he introduces so relatable to me as a reader. If you're familiar with the author's other works, you know he's a fan of minimalism and seeks to inspire others "to pursue their passions while owning fewer possessions." That sentiment influences this book greatly, particularly in how you live your life, spend your time, contribute to your community, and influence those around you. If you are new to practicing minimalism, some statements might come across as blunt - "If you want to live a more meaningful life focused on the things that matter, own less stuff." I'd encourage you to not get discouraged by that and to keep reading because he also writes, "it's important to note that owning less is not about owning nothing. It's about owning the right things and the right number of them." And what he shares about his Grandpa's life and sense of purpose is still resonating in my mind days after finishing the book. He lived a life that mattered and I want to live my life like that too. This book provides you with plenty to think about to help do just that.

  23. 5 out of 5

    CK

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Regarding the form, the main issue is that the book is called « Things that Matter » while it mainly focuses on defining what constitutes « distractions ». It does contain some valuable ideas… which are already well known. A brief summary would be: memento mori and « superfluities in the end deprive us of necessities » (Choderlos de Laclos). There are some very very problematic parts (the chapter about work would transform Reagan into a communist) that give an impression of a somewhat superficial Regarding the form, the main issue is that the book is called « Things that Matter » while it mainly focuses on defining what constitutes « distractions ». It does contain some valuable ideas… which are already well known. A brief summary would be: memento mori and « superfluities in the end deprive us of necessities » (Choderlos de Laclos). There are some very very problematic parts (the chapter about work would transform Reagan into a communist) that give an impression of a somewhat superficial analysis (retirement being bad because politicians/Bismarck invented it … ?!) on real issues. Among other things, it’s a rather interesting choice to tell your readers that they’re richer than most of the planet if they have more than $5 a day and live in a developed country. I’m sure all the Americans without healthcare or any form of social security feel very privileged knowing that they are richer than the majority of the planet… At one point I thought the author was about to remind us that we are indeed able to read (yet another privilege). Overall, it did feel like reading your well-meaning but over-preaching uncle who can’t help but justify every opinion he has with a simple anecdote. The book started well but lost momentum due to excessive repetitions and a lack of depth on important topics (hence the feeling of inconsistency).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Lutz

    Joshua Becker had written several books about minimalism over the last decade as well as a blog and Facebook page. I have enjoyed all of those and was curious as to whether this new book would live up to my expectations. It has. This new offering provides readers with in-depth information that I had been looking for to answer “what now?” After arriving at my perfect place of minimalism (and it is an ongoing lifestyle) I was needing more. This book answered that for me. It provides clear info on Joshua Becker had written several books about minimalism over the last decade as well as a blog and Facebook page. I have enjoyed all of those and was curious as to whether this new book would live up to my expectations. It has. This new offering provides readers with in-depth information that I had been looking for to answer “what now?” After arriving at my perfect place of minimalism (and it is an ongoing lifestyle) I was needing more. This book answered that for me. It provides clear info on why we may be fearful of the next step, assists in working through that and even how to figure out what that next step could be. As with Joshua’s other books, this, too, is like having a conversation with a friend. Easy and open dialogue. I highly recommend this book

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Things that matter started okay, and was going to get a 3-star rating, but then I had some strong disagreements, and some parts of this book felt insulting and insensitive. The author was a pastor, and though he did make sure the book did not have a religious tone, there are parts of the book that read close-minded and with judgmental assumptions. In one chapter, he slut shames and claims that people who have sex with multiple partners are unhappy. In another chapter, he discusses money like peo Things that matter started okay, and was going to get a 3-star rating, but then I had some strong disagreements, and some parts of this book felt insulting and insensitive. The author was a pastor, and though he did make sure the book did not have a religious tone, there are parts of the book that read close-minded and with judgmental assumptions. In one chapter, he slut shames and claims that people who have sex with multiple partners are unhappy. In another chapter, he discusses money like people aren't REALLY struggling financially and just want more money. To elaborate, Chapter 6 is about money, and the author says people living paycheque to paycheque need to do a better job to cut down expenses AS IF people living this way aren't doing that already. I found this chapter to come across as if people don't have bills and debt to pay, and therefore they must have money but are careless with it. The book is new, so there's no reason the author shouldn't be witnessing inflation. The author doesn't show compassion or understanding toward the average person and is ignorant of people's circumstances. Not everyone is a millionaire or had a career when he did back in 2008 to afford a house when it was reasonable. Not everyone has a partner and the benefit of a shared income. Not everyone can afford to buy a home, and the costs make it difficult to save money with a fair income job. People struggle to pay for the costs of their home or upkeep if things happen. Renting prices have increased so much that individuals who want to save to buy a house cannot even achieve this. His solution to being happy if you're financially struggling is this: If you're stressed about money, which is apparently 70%, the quickest way to elevate that stress and change your outlook is to give some money away. Yes, giving makes us feel better. Many of us have no problem spending money here and there on friends and family but still need to make conscious choices on how much. The author doesn't have an understanding of circumstances and has no idea. He comes across as an inconsiderate, ignorant, privileged person who doesn't understand financial struggle because he's in a financial, secure position with his life many will never be able to get to or achieve in their lifetime. This book is not for the average person or the majority born in the 90s or 80s, or without two household incomes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    If you were to die today, what one thing would you be most disappointed you did not complete? (123/3445) Do you want to get off the easy path of the ordinary and immediate and get onto “a more intentional path that leads to a life that satisfies, and resonates beyond your own mortal existence – a life lived well”? (95/3445) Becker has given us a good book to help us live a life that matters, with fewer regrets. He writes about finding our purpose, including an exercise investigating our passions If you were to die today, what one thing would you be most disappointed you did not complete? (123/3445) Do you want to get off the easy path of the ordinary and immediate and get onto “a more intentional path that leads to a life that satisfies, and resonates beyond your own mortal existence – a life lived well”? (95/3445) Becker has given us a good book to help us live a life that matters, with fewer regrets. He writes about finding our purpose, including an exercise investigating our passions and abilities, combining them with meeting the needs of others. He explores the obstacles to a life that matters and helps with strategies to remove them. I like his emphasis on self examination, helping us identify things that keep us from being our best self. I like his reminding us, “Selfless living results in greater overall life satisfaction.” (1120/3445) Becker is passionate about minimalism and it shows in this book. He helps us see how having less stuff really allows us to go after our highest pursuits. He encourages us to be contributing people rather than consuming ones. He suggests we share our journey with others, not keeping hidden our insights to a better life. This is a good book to help us live life with greater intention and fewer regrets. It's not easy. It may take a technology detox. It may take serious self examination regarding time, focus, and energy wasters. If you are willing to make the best of your remaining years, this book will help you get on the right path. I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Thomas

    Things that Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life by Joshua Becker 9780593193976 271 Pages Publisher WaterBrook & Multnomah, WaterBrook Release Date: April 19, 2022 Nonfiction, Self-Help, Minimalism, Health, Mind & Body, Spirit I have been following Joshua’s blog and newsletter, Becoming Minimalist for years. When I saw that he wrote this book, I knew I had to read it. Although there are many mentions of his faith, it is not a religious book. There are many Aha moments through Things that Matter: Overcoming Distraction to Pursue a More Meaningful Life by Joshua Becker 9780593193976 271 Pages Publisher WaterBrook & Multnomah, WaterBrook Release Date: April 19, 2022 Nonfiction, Self-Help, Minimalism, Health, Mind & Body, Spirit I have been following Joshua’s blog and newsletter, Becoming Minimalist for years. When I saw that he wrote this book, I knew I had to read it. Although there are many mentions of his faith, it is not a religious book. There are many Aha moments throughout. I found myself highlighting many sentences in the book repeatedly. The main message in the book is to live without regrets. He does not push the minimalist message, but it makes sense that if you have less, you will worry less, clean less, and spend less. This leaves more time to live. As I write this review, I am aware of previous things that distracted me from writing and habits that affected my quality of life. I have a plan for making the changes permanent and already started implementing some. If you need a gentle push to show you how to make permanent changes to your way or thinking about yourself or the things that you do, this is an excellent book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie Jones

    This book goes into more of a minimal life - but from a whole life overview. This one is less about the stuff, and more about the stuff of life. What we do with our time, how we spend our energy and attention. It’s a fairly typical Joshua Becker book, in that it is easy to read, conversational, full of quotes and anecdotes and examples, and it’s also something new. I think I probably have all of Joshua’s books, and I enjoy reading them. This book was no exception, and has definitely made me think This book goes into more of a minimal life - but from a whole life overview. This one is less about the stuff, and more about the stuff of life. What we do with our time, how we spend our energy and attention. It’s a fairly typical Joshua Becker book, in that it is easy to read, conversational, full of quotes and anecdotes and examples, and it’s also something new. I think I probably have all of Joshua’s books, and I enjoy reading them. This book was no exception, and has definitely made me think more deeply about some of the concepts covered. There are links made to the clutter and level of items in our homes, but that is not the main focus of the book. I highly recommend this, especially if you are feeling overwhelmed with the stuff of life, and don’t know how best to cut it back or prioritise what means the most to you in this season. I received access to an early release of the E-book in exchange for an honest review. This was well worth reading and I will most likely buy the book to maintain access to the content!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    I have been following Joshua Becker for several years now and was super excited when I heard he has written another book. He is very passionate about helping others minimize not only their possessions but also with removing anything that distracts you from your best life. This passion is very obvious in Things That Matter and this book does not disappoint. He dives into different distractions that can prevent you from leading a meaningful and purposeful life and gives practical advice on how to r I have been following Joshua Becker for several years now and was super excited when I heard he has written another book. He is very passionate about helping others minimize not only their possessions but also with removing anything that distracts you from your best life. This passion is very obvious in Things That Matter and this book does not disappoint. He dives into different distractions that can prevent you from leading a meaningful and purposeful life and gives practical advice on how to remove those distractions. Joshua is not only very insightful and inspirational, but he is so relatable and down to earth. This is a book that everyone should read, and I definitely plan on reading this one again and again anytime I need a reminder as to what is truly important. This is a must read! Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Warren

    Since I first read (and reread) the author’s “The More of Less”, I’ve been looking for similar guidance on minimizing the intangible “stuff” in my life that keeps me at times from achieving a personal goal. Becker’s direct approach outlining the objective (pursuing a life with meaning) and the obstacles that may get in the way (distractions) kept me engaged with short chapters and personal narrative drawing from his own experience. I found myself naming my own challenges and outlining what steps Since I first read (and reread) the author’s “The More of Less”, I’ve been looking for similar guidance on minimizing the intangible “stuff” in my life that keeps me at times from achieving a personal goal. Becker’s direct approach outlining the objective (pursuing a life with meaning) and the obstacles that may get in the way (distractions) kept me engaged with short chapters and personal narrative drawing from his own experience. I found myself naming my own challenges and outlining what steps I was going to take to minimize their impact on my larger life goals. I like that this book does not rely on productivity hacks, to do lists or other management techniques to achieve the goal of living with less distraction and more focus. I know that this is another book I’ll be reading again and again. I received a complementary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.

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