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Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be

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The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker hats), as told by award-winning Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss. It was only two decades ago, but, for the women of country music, 1999 seems like an entirely different universe. With Shania Twain, country’s biggest award winner and star, and The Chicks topping every chart, country music was a woman’s world: specifically, country radio and Nashville’s Music Row. Cut to 2021, when women are only played on country radio 16% of the time, on a good day, and when only men have won Entertainer of the Year at the CMA Awards for a decade. To a world where artists like Kacey Musgraves sell out arenas but barely score a single second of airplay. But also to a world where these women are infinitely bigger live draws than most male counterparts, having massive pop crossover hits like Maren Morris’s “The Middle,” pushing the industry to confront its deeply embedded racial biases with Mickey Guyton’s “Black Like Me,” winning heaps of Grammy nominations, banding up in supergroups like The Highwomen and taking complete control of their own careers, on their own terms. When the rules stopped working for the women of country music, they threw them out and made their own: and changed the genre forever, and for better. Her Country is veteran Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss’s story of how in the past two decades, country’s women fought back against systems designed to keep them down, armed with their art and never willing to just shut up and sing: how women like Kacey, Mickey, Maren, The Chicks, Miranda Lambert, Rissi Palmer, Brandy Clark, LeAnn Rimes, Brandi Carlile, Margo Price and many more have reinvented the rules to find their place in an industry stacked against them, how they’ve ruled the century when it comes to artistic output—and about how women can and do belong in the mainstream of country music, even if their voices aren’t being heard as loudly.


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The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker hats), as told by award-winning Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss. It was only two decades ago, but, for the women of country music, 1999 seems like an entirely different universe. With Shania Twain, country’s biggest award winner and star, and The Chicks topping every chart, country music was a woman’s world: specifically, country radio and Nashville’s Music Row. Cut to 2021, when women are only played on country radio 16% of the time, on a good day, and when only men have won Entertainer of the Year at the CMA Awards for a decade. To a world where artists like Kacey Musgraves sell out arenas but barely score a single second of airplay. But also to a world where these women are infinitely bigger live draws than most male counterparts, having massive pop crossover hits like Maren Morris’s “The Middle,” pushing the industry to confront its deeply embedded racial biases with Mickey Guyton’s “Black Like Me,” winning heaps of Grammy nominations, banding up in supergroups like The Highwomen and taking complete control of their own careers, on their own terms. When the rules stopped working for the women of country music, they threw them out and made their own: and changed the genre forever, and for better. Her Country is veteran Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss’s story of how in the past two decades, country’s women fought back against systems designed to keep them down, armed with their art and never willing to just shut up and sing: how women like Kacey, Mickey, Maren, The Chicks, Miranda Lambert, Rissi Palmer, Brandy Clark, LeAnn Rimes, Brandi Carlile, Margo Price and many more have reinvented the rules to find their place in an industry stacked against them, how they’ve ruled the century when it comes to artistic output—and about how women can and do belong in the mainstream of country music, even if their voices aren’t being heard as loudly.

30 review for Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nev

    I absolutely loved this book. I’m not really someone who likes country music, but I love reading about different genres and the music industry. So this book being focused on how women went from being some of the biggest stars in country music in the 90s to barely getting played on modern country radio was super fascinating. Her Country focuses on three women (Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton) and how they’re making music that is critically acclaimed yet still isn’t embraced by th I absolutely loved this book. I’m not really someone who likes country music, but I love reading about different genres and the music industry. So this book being focused on how women went from being some of the biggest stars in country music in the 90s to barely getting played on modern country radio was super fascinating. Her Country focuses on three women (Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton) and how they’re making music that is critically acclaimed yet still isn’t embraced by the powers that be in the country mainstream. I appreciated how this book pointed out different artists who fall outside of the white or straight mold that is most prevalent in country artists. Getting a history of different people and seeing artists who are coming out now during the midst of their careers was great to see. This is one of those books that will probably frustrate you because of the misogynistic practices it talks about. Like record companies being like “well we already have one girl, we don’t need another” or radio stations refusing to play music from women back to back. If this book sounds interesting to you then I definitely recommend checking it out. I was so engrossed by it that I ended up listening to the whole audiobook in one day. I think that even if you aren’t a fan of country music it’s a great read about sexism and racism in the music industry and artists who are trying to forge their own path outside of what was traditionally seen as the way to do things in the genre. Thank you to the publisher for providing an advance copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    raquel (taylor's version)

    Taylor Swift has the most awarded country album of all time, she changed the country industry and she's not even mentioned once? I'm suing Taylor Swift has the most awarded country album of all time, she changed the country industry and she's not even mentioned once? I'm suing

  3. 5 out of 5

    Natalie (readswithnatalieb)

    4.5 rounded up! If you’re a country music lover, this is for you. But not specifically a country music lover, a fan of the women of country music. Depending on when you started to listen to country music, you’ve probably noticed men dominate the airwaves. This book not only does a deep dive into the reasons why, but Moss goes deeper into the gender issues of country music. And yes, this absolutely runs parallel with every other aspects of life, not just the music industry. As a country lover and 4.5 rounded up! If you’re a country music lover, this is for you. But not specifically a country music lover, a fan of the women of country music. Depending on when you started to listen to country music, you’ve probably noticed men dominate the airwaves. This book not only does a deep dive into the reasons why, but Moss goes deeper into the gender issues of country music. And yes, this absolutely runs parallel with every other aspects of life, not just the music industry. As a country lover and someone from Texas, I vividly remember The Chicks being disowned by country music. This was the most monumental moment of change based on social media, TV, radio, etc. (There were plenty of women before them who made similar statements, but I mean this based on ability of outreach due to the excessive amount of platforms). I was young enough to remember this moment, but not old enough to truly understand the reasons why. Truth be told, this happening began the political conversations in my household to where I was learning more about the world (I was 11, mind you). It was truly fascinating learning how much these ladies were connected to not only changing the ways of country music, but the people and places around them. This review could be a whole lot longer, but you’d be better off reading the book! Big thank you to Henry Holt for the gifted copy and Macmillan Audio for the ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thank you, NetGalley, for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is a challenging review to write. Partially because I have so many thoughts about what I read, and partially because most of those thoughts are very critical. As someone who grew up listening to country music and considers Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris to be two of my favorite singers, I wanted to like this book a lot more than I ultimately did. It’s hard to write a negative review when Thank you, NetGalley, for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is a challenging review to write. Partially because I have so many thoughts about what I read, and partially because most of those thoughts are very critical. As someone who grew up listening to country music and considers Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris to be two of my favorite singers, I wanted to like this book a lot more than I ultimately did. It’s hard to write a negative review when so much of the response is overwhelmingly positive, but I still want to be honest. As the author herself points out time and again, honesty is part of what makes country music great. But first, the positives. Her Country is at its strongest when it lets its protagonists—mainly Kacey, Maren, and Mickey Guyton—speak for themselves. Most of the women here come across as likable and interesting people when left to their own devices, and I enjoyed learning about their childhoods, career paths, and creative processes. Author Marissa Moss details the sexism and double standards prevalent within the music industry, while also reminding the audience of just how female-forward country music has been in the past. Radio play for female country artists is at a critical low, and I vividly remember a years-long period of time when the only women whose voices you’d hear were Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, and occasionally Miranda Lambert. At the same time, country had periods where it was the most feminine genre in the industry, particularly during the 90s, and Moss never fails to recount the many women who found success on the country airwaves for the better part of the 20th Century. She also speaks about the role empathy plays in country music, and why it’s what makes the genre so compelling. The best parts of the book were when the curtain was pulled back on the songwriting process, and we were shown the many partnerships and inspirations behind singles both iconic and overlooked. As a New Yorker, I especially appreciated how Moss took the time to shine a light on the huge yet little-known country music fan base in my state. There are technical issues in Her Country, especially towards the beginning. Moss spends a lot of time making lists, describing every detail of what concert goers are wearing or what a particular artist listened to growing up. There’s also a great deal of repetition, with many stories being dug up again and again (the blacklisting of the Dixie Chicks, Tomatogate, etc). A lot of the language is crafted to appeal to the Twitter crowd more so than the average reader, such as her use of the word “Latinx” (a term that polling has shown to be overwhelmingly unpopular among Hispanics). I often found myself questioning who this book’s target audience was—certainly not traditional country fans, at the very least. Then I realized that Her Country was probably intended for someone like me: a twenty-something woman from a blue state who loves many of the women profiled here. But as much as I enjoyed learning more about the stars of this book, there were other, more worrisome aspects of Her Country that got in the way of its strengths, and illuminated the cultural divide within this country more than they bridged it. There are numerous times in this work when details are twisted or omitted to fit a particular narrative. Moss claims that Taylor Swift was eventually demonized as a public figure, which she argues is par for the course in country music, yet she fails to mention that Taylor’s short-lived downfall happened several years after she officially departed country music for pop, and concerned a feud between her, a rapper, and a reality TV star. She points out the double standards in Leann Rimes’ and Jason Aldean’s respective cheating scandals—her career was ruined, his remains untouched—but doesn’t take note of Miranda Lambert’s numerous affairs with married men, which also did little to damage her career. George W. Bush is panned for not supporting gay marriage when he was president, even though most politicians at the time were against it, including Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Singers like Maren and Taylor are praised for embracing their creativity by going pop, but the unspoken truth that pop music also tends to pay better is just that—unspoken. The most egregious example is the blacklisting of the Dixie Chicks (now just “The Chicks”), who were met with outrage after they publicly criticized Bush and the Iraq War. There’s no denying that the Chicks were unfairly treated, but in all the pages Moss dedicates to the scandal, there’s no reflection about why their stance garnered so much controversy besides sexism. Moss never considers how the collective trauma of the most brutal attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor stoked the public’s response, or that the enormity of this catastrophe is was prompted such extreme reactions (despite all her remarks about how country singers are told to just “shut up and sing,” none have ever faced this magnitude of backlash when they spoke about other contested issues, which lends credence to the uniqueness of this situation). Nor does she factor in the role of xenophobia—though Moss includes one throwaway line about how “some people” were upset that the Chicks spoke against the president on foreign soil, she does not consider how strong anti-American sentiment was in Europe during the War on Terror (which was profound enough that European scholars have written entire theses about it), thus adding insult to injury. Here, in a book published twenty years after the fact, is the perfect opportunity for this kind of reconsideration. But there’s none of that; instead, it’s simplified as a character assassination by ignorant rednecks. Which brings us to the second issue: Her County is the ultimate liberal good/conservative bad story. What makes the women of this book exceptional—and therefore worthy of mainstream attention—is their rejection of traditionalism and embrace of what country considers taboo. They’re not like those rednecks, see? They’re good liberals like us, just with a twang! I agree that inclusion and the acceptance of marginalized groups is undoubtedly a good thing, but the sentiment runs deeper than that. By claiming that artists like Kacey and Maren are the “true” artists of country music and the inevitable future of the genre, unlike those bros in trucks or crooners who sing about why they love their hometowns, Moss promotes the belief that conservatism is inherently wrong and that conservatives shouldn’t have any cultural influence or spaces of their own. Bush and Trump are both skewered, while Mickey’s chance to perform for the Obamas and Maren’s fundraising for Biden are considered, respectively, an incredible honor and a sign of integrity. Almost every male country singer mentioned is written off for one perceived flaw or another, with the exception of the very-publicly liberal Jason Isbell, who is showered with praise multiple times throughout the book. This goes without further explanation or justification because Her Country is written with the assumption that the audience already shares these beliefs. Moss even praises Kacey for “evolving” politically, unlike the simpletons who were “unable to.” Conservative singers are corporate, uninteresting, and cheap, while liberal ones are the only hope to save the genre. Country music is one of the few cultural areas where conservatives have any real influence, but even that is too much to permit. But while Her Country explores the hurdles faced by marginalized groups in the industry and in society at large, it completely overlooks the role of wealth and class. In addition to learning about Kacey, Maren, and Miranda’s childhood talent and ambition, we also learn about their privileged upbringings—all had families that supported their dreams from the time they were old enough to sing and devoted the girls’ formative years to building their careers, booking gigs, and getting them record deals. Moss focuses on how hardworking and determined they are, but not their material advantages. Perhaps no singer emulates this better than Taylor Swift, who is portrayed as a victim when “critics” panned one of her massively successful and critically acclaimed albums (no mention of who these critics were though), and is applauded for having the self-possession as a teenager to turn down a record deal where she wouldn’t be given full control of her music. What Moss doesn’t mention is that Taylor grew up in a mansion and that her father was a shareholder at the record label she eventually signed with. And herein lies the issue at the heart of Moss’ argument that singers shouldn’t be told to just “shut up and sing.” Country singers make millions of dollars pretending to be poor. They write songs about life on the farm and struggling to make ends meet from penthouses in Nashville and palatial estates in Georgia. People who actually face these predicaments in real life let them do it—and get rich off of their pain—in exchange for entertainment. What they didn’t sign up for is for these same people to practice what journalist Michael Lind calls “celebrity imperialism”: a moralizing from the rich and famous about how the working class should be as ethically pure as them. Maren Morris can sing about defunding the police (and she has), but she does so from her gated community guarded by private security. She’s not one of the tens of millions of people who would suffer from these policies. (If you want to know what crime is like for regular people, well, take a look at New York). Kacey Musgraves can tweet about how racist and awful her fellow Americans are (and she has), but she’s doing it from an iPhone that some of those same people paid for. No, country singers don’t have to shut up and sing. They don’t owe us anything beyond what they sell to consumers. But you can’t begrudge people for not wanting to be preached to by the same people who capitalize on their suffering.* I love both Maren and Kacey’s work and hope they continue to put out great music. I hope Mickey’s career takes off. Maybe Her Country will bring in some new fans who are currently unfamiliar with these talented women, but I doubt it will do much to win over fans of mainstream country music. Her Country simply misses the mark too many times. *In fairness to Maren, she recently put out an album/song called “Humble Quest” which seems to indicate that she’s aware of this dynamic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Holly R W

    Several years back, I became a country music fan. I must have been in my 50's at the time. This country music was different than the country music of my childhood - it was less twangy, a bit leaning towards pop, and at least the women artists were singing songs that I could relate to. (Although there were still plenty of songs about cheating, beer, etc.) I grew to like the music of the Dixie Chicks, Kelly Clarkson, Miranda Lambert, and so many others, including the legendary singers who had come Several years back, I became a country music fan. I must have been in my 50's at the time. This country music was different than the country music of my childhood - it was less twangy, a bit leaning towards pop, and at least the women artists were singing songs that I could relate to. (Although there were still plenty of songs about cheating, beer, etc.) I grew to like the music of the Dixie Chicks, Kelly Clarkson, Miranda Lambert, and so many others, including the legendary singers who had come before. Not to overlook the male stars, I also listened to Brad Paisley, Eric Church, Toby Keith, etc. After a lifetime of listening to folk, rock and pop music, I couldn't have been more surprised by my new interest. My husband and I even traveled to Nashville to take in all of the sights and sounds of Music City, U.S.A. A few years back, my interest in country music waned. Recently I spied this book in the library and checked it out. In reading, I saw that there are now exciting new female stars I'm unaware of. Soon I was watching videos of them on Youtube. I was re-acquainting myself about artists I had forgotten about. The book itself looks at the difficulties female country musicians have had in pursuing their careers in a male dominated industry. As an example, women are played on country radio only 10 % of the time. The book also looks at the special challenges that LGBTQ women artists and artists of color have with achieving commercial success. Here are some of the music videos that I've discovered and enjoyed. Brandi Carlile, who is married to a woman, sings about being a mother. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLNr9... Kacey Musgraves singing her signature song, "Follow Your Arrow". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYsll... A duet with Kacey and pop star Katy Perry singing "Merry-Go-Round". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTZod... Not really a country song "If I Aint Got You", but beautifully sung by country artist Maren Morris in a duet with pop star Alicia Keyes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeFaT...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    As a longtime country music fan, 'Her Country' was one of my most anticipated books of 2022. I was not disappointed. Clearly writing as someone who loves country music, Moss uses the stories of 3 female contemporary country singers-Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton-to trace the story of women in country music over the last 25 years. While things have never been exactly equal between men and women in country music, it was a lot better in the 90s-we had Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, As a longtime country music fan, 'Her Country' was one of my most anticipated books of 2022. I was not disappointed. Clearly writing as someone who loves country music, Moss uses the stories of 3 female contemporary country singers-Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton-to trace the story of women in country music over the last 25 years. While things have never been exactly equal between men and women in country music, it was a lot better in the 90s-we had Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, Martina McBride, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, The (Dixie) Chicks, and more getting plenty of airplay on the radio. But then, over the past 20 years, women stopped getting played on the air as much, to the point that now country stations won't play two female artists back to back, & their programming software is literally set to play 1 female song to every 9 male songs. What happened? How did we get here? Moss explains how the conglomeration of radio stations, the jingoist patriotism of the post 9/11 era, and the Nashville music industry has come together to exclude women from being played on the radio, and not just women: people of color and queer people too. For as little space as country radio has for women, women that aren't white or straight have so much less. And yet, they're still out here, trying. Making music. Selling out stadiums. In Mickey's case, trying for literally decades to break into the industry, before finally getting some recognition for 'Black Like Me' in the wake of the BLM protests in 2020 (if you haven't heard the song, go listen to it, it's stellar). Moss skillfully weaves together a cultural narrative as well as the individual narratives of these 3 women, while also talking about so many other artists (famous and less so) that very much should be mentioned. This book is infuriating, in that it lays bare so much of the sexism, racism, and bigotry of the industry-but it's hopeful too, telling the stories of people who just refuse to quit, who did it their way, and noting how while slow, change is happening. I loved this book so much, and even if you’re not a huge country music fan, you should definitely read it anyway. 5/5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I want to love this! Great interviews with amazing artists I admire but I felt that it was a bit overwritten and the chapters weren’t cohesive.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    i was honestly surprised how much i enjoyed this. i've never been a huge fan of country music (i was raised by an "anything but country" mother lol), but sing along to the Iconic Tunes (i.e. Before He Cheats, Jolene, and Man! I Feel Like A Woman) and have enjoyed quite a few country artists over the past few years - particularly Kacey Musgraves, whose album Golden Hour has been one of my favorites for years and whose inclusion in this book was the initial draw for me. this book is incredibly wel i was honestly surprised how much i enjoyed this. i've never been a huge fan of country music (i was raised by an "anything but country" mother lol), but sing along to the Iconic Tunes (i.e. Before He Cheats, Jolene, and Man! I Feel Like A Woman) and have enjoyed quite a few country artists over the past few years - particularly Kacey Musgraves, whose album Golden Hour has been one of my favorites for years and whose inclusion in this book was the initial draw for me. this book is incredibly well-researched and well-interviewed, and provides an amazingly in-depth account of how country radio (and country music as a whole) has treated women since the 1990s. being so disconnected from country, i had only heard of the issues within country radio but hadn't looked into them much. and goodness do i know so much now!! this is a book that will leave you angry and frustrated at the injustices in country radio and how little the Powers That Be are willing to change, but also hopeful for the future with these powerful women paving their own paths forward. i was captivated throughout the book, fully invested in Kacey, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton's stories, and actually found some new tunes in the process! i checked out more music from all three women (and a few others mentioned in the book) and have had Maren's GIRL on repeat all week. regardless of your feelings on country music, i highly recommend this to anyone interested in the music industry or gender studies and broader issues of sexism, misogyny, racism, and homophobia. (also this was my first ever ARC and also my first ever giveaway win, so thank you to Henry Holt for sending me this copy!)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    GIRL POWER! I’ll admit right up front- I’ve long appreciated the attitudes of the three women featured in this book (Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves) without actually listening to their music. But now they, and many others mentioned, have their own playlist that’s getting frequent play in my car. Even though I wasn’t already familiar with much of the music discussed here, I was still fascinated by the inside look at Nashville and the machine that is the music business there. Moss GIRL POWER! I’ll admit right up front- I’ve long appreciated the attitudes of the three women featured in this book (Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves) without actually listening to their music. But now they, and many others mentioned, have their own playlist that’s getting frequent play in my car. Even though I wasn’t already familiar with much of the music discussed here, I was still fascinated by the inside look at Nashville and the machine that is the music business there. Moss deftly pulls back the curtain to show the everyday sexism and racism that is embedded into the fabric of the Nashville music business - and vividly portrays the young musicians who have helped begin to change it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Avilov

    Her Country by Marissa R. Moss is a phenomenal look into the "Good Ole' Boys Club" of the Nashville / Country music scene and how the women of today navigate it. The book focuses specifically on Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton but includes their collaborators and friends along the way, too. Being a fan of these artists, and knowing the songs referenced throughout, really personalized the experience of this book for me but at the end of the day is not a pre-req to understanding t Her Country by Marissa R. Moss is a phenomenal look into the "Good Ole' Boys Club" of the Nashville / Country music scene and how the women of today navigate it. The book focuses specifically on Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton but includes their collaborators and friends along the way, too. Being a fan of these artists, and knowing the songs referenced throughout, really personalized the experience of this book for me but at the end of the day is not a pre-req to understanding the key messages shared here. This book expertly navigates how stars like Kacey, Maren, and Mickey took the path less travelled - not because they wanted to but because Country Radio and the Music Industry wouldn't give them a chance otherwise. I have so much respect for these artists, and all artists in general, but to see the ways in which they, and the women who have come before them, have stuck it to the man and stood up for what they believe is right is really inspiring. I loved the inside peek into this industry and will now double down on my support for all of the female country artists that I love. The audio version of Her Country is performed by Kelli Tager and is a great way to take in this powerful story. Thank you to Netgalley and Macmillan Audio for the ARC - Her Country is out 5/10/22. Now I'm off to Listen to Merry Go 'Round on repeat!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura Dvorak

    A must-read for conflicted fans of country music like myself. This book charts the challenging rise of women in country music post-1990s. While focused on the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris specifically, the author references many other artists who pushed the boundaries of country music both on and off stage. Lots of interesting behind the scenes stories and you'll leave with a new appreciation of all the artists profiled. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for A must-read for conflicted fans of country music like myself. This book charts the challenging rise of women in country music post-1990s. While focused on the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris specifically, the author references many other artists who pushed the boundaries of country music both on and off stage. Lots of interesting behind the scenes stories and you'll leave with a new appreciation of all the artists profiled. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing an eARC in exchange for this review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maryjo

    I’ll be adding so many new songs to my playlists because of this book! A smart and angry book with such compelling storytelling!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    Inspiring and disheartening at the same time but the energy around these women is undeniable. And the music it will have you listening to is just the best.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Mellard

    From what I knew of the author and subject, I already knew, before turning the first page, that this was going to be an important book, and a good one. By just a few chapters in, it was evident that it was so much more than that: great, heartfelt, poignant, and an essential, genre-shifting work.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    As a country music fan since basically birth I remember the women artists of the 1980s-1990s and as I grew up and got some disaffected I drifted to more rock and indie music. Returning to country music in my 30s was startling to see what it had became- bro country and hardly any ladies on the radio. Marissa Moss' book is a well researched (and interviewed!) book about the ways that country music has changed since the 1990s and includes interviews and overviews of the the careers of many female ar As a country music fan since basically birth I remember the women artists of the 1980s-1990s and as I grew up and got some disaffected I drifted to more rock and indie music. Returning to country music in my 30s was startling to see what it had became- bro country and hardly any ladies on the radio. Marissa Moss' book is a well researched (and interviewed!) book about the ways that country music has changed since the 1990s and includes interviews and overviews of the the careers of many female artists of late- including Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris. I enjoyed reading the book and it also made me look up lots of other artists that might have slipped past me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rhode

    Excited about this coming out!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin | snappshelfbooks

    I grew up listening to only country music. It was the sound track to my whole childhood and I wrote many articles connecting that in various ways to new songs when I spent a period of time as a writer for a non-Nashville country music website for a fun little side gig. It was during that time when I learned about Marissa Moss and have followed her journalism ever since. I’ve been waiting for this book for years or however long Marissa has been tweeting about working on it and I devoured it in tw I grew up listening to only country music. It was the sound track to my whole childhood and I wrote many articles connecting that in various ways to new songs when I spent a period of time as a writer for a non-Nashville country music website for a fun little side gig. It was during that time when I learned about Marissa Moss and have followed her journalism ever since. I’ve been waiting for this book for years or however long Marissa has been tweeting about working on it and I devoured it in two days. This book has everything that the country music industry doesn’t want you to see but everyone knows is there: misogyny, racism, homophobia, and so much more. It was a fascinating journey through the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton while weaving in all the other women and relevant people of the time. I found myself being reminded of so many things that I saw in real time I had forgotten. It’s honestly inspiring to truly see how women of country music have created their own paths to success while fighting every obstacle against them. I loved the chronological organization of the book, moving year to year through out these two decades. It did take me a little bit to get used to the writing style, there would be a relevant side tangent for a few paragraphs then back to the main point, which is exactly how my mind works. So once I picked up on that, it was super insightful and enriched the main point. I found myself wanting to pause to look up every name, every song, every album, etc. Thankfully there’s a playlist in the back of the book! I did notice that Kacey was not listed in the names of new interviews done for this book, nor was she thanked in the acknowledgments for her time in collaboration - Maren & Mickey were. No cause for concern. I think the research done is thorough and stands alone just fine. I’m just curious why she didn’t participate. Overall, I highly recommend this book. Not just to country music fans, but to fans of all music. Or fans of women beating the odds. Or those looking to understand more about the larger main stream systems of oppression and how straight white women may experience obstacles, but they can still find easier paths to success compared to Black artists, especially Black women and LGTBQIA+ artists. I hope in ten years there’s a sequel to this book that highlights the growth of Black women artists, non binary artists, queer artists, disabled artists, and all other artists that fall outside of the country music status quo. I look forward to watching that shift in real time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Loved this! From Maren to Kacey to Mickey, this book does a really wonderful job of examining why it is that country music does such an atrocious job of uplifting female artists the same way they embrace and support white men. (It shouldn't come as a surprise that a lot of internalized misogyny and racism, coupled with white male radio execs pulling the strings on who gets radio play, is the formula at play here.) There are three main through lines in the book, which are the career trajectories o Loved this! From Maren to Kacey to Mickey, this book does a really wonderful job of examining why it is that country music does such an atrocious job of uplifting female artists the same way they embrace and support white men. (It shouldn't come as a surprise that a lot of internalized misogyny and racism, coupled with white male radio execs pulling the strings on who gets radio play, is the formula at play here.) There are three main through lines in the book, which are the career trajectories of Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton. You learn about each of their individual upbringings, musical influences, introduction to country music and performing, and the entire history of each of their paths to achieving success in the country music world. Spoiler alert- for very different reasons, they each had their own struggles to defeat, and I loved reading about how they each overcame every obstacle thrown their way. Throughout the book, there are also countless references to iconic women in country through the years, and artists like Taylor Swift, The Chicks, Dolly Parton, Miranda Lambert, and Shania Twain are all given significant sections woven into the book as well. The author, Marissa R. Moss, did an impeccable job of researching and organizing the book structurally to include ALL women in country-- not just the popular ones or the ones you've heard of, but all women, including women of color and queer women in country, who have been historically left out of the conversation entirely, regardless of talent or ability. Mickey Guyton's story, for instance, is a perfect example of a woman playing all of the right cards and checking every single box-- but was, until recently, pushed aside and erased simply due to her being a Black woman. Fortunately, Mickey is finally beginning to get the recognition she deserves, and I hope more marginalized women in country are able to get their careers off the ground as well. A side note- I felt SO seen by the digs at Jason Aldean! Everything he does annoys me, and to have someone validate everything I feel about him in writing was truly *chef's kiss*. (In particular, the media's obsession and casting aside of LeAnn Rimes because of her affair, meanwhile, Jason did the exact same thing and suffered absolutely zero consequence because of it. This has always bothered me endlessly and I'm glad someone said it!)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I received an advance reading copy of Her Country and I really enjoyed Marissa Moss' book regarding women and country music and the success they have but shouldn't because of the closed minds and misogynic views of those who don't want them to have it. Ms. Moss addresses the publicity junkets that are just an excuse for the radio execs to get drunk and try to take advantage of these spectacular women who not just can sing but can write some of the best damn music in the country genre and beyond. I received an advance reading copy of Her Country and I really enjoyed Marissa Moss' book regarding women and country music and the success they have but shouldn't because of the closed minds and misogynic views of those who don't want them to have it. Ms. Moss addresses the publicity junkets that are just an excuse for the radio execs to get drunk and try to take advantage of these spectacular women who not just can sing but can write some of the best damn music in the country genre and beyond. A big part of Her Country is how you hardly hear a country song sung by a woman on the country music stations unless it's a duet with a male country singer and you know what its true. I work in an antique store one day a week and the radio is set to a local country station and week in and week out it's the same old tune and none of it is a woman...it's all men. How I wish I had the money to have a station that played the music that these woman write and sing. God forbid if a woman should sing about a subject that's taboo in the county industry but it's okay for a man to do so. A woman is vilified for doing so. And then there's the country singers who are subjected to racism because of the color of their skin or their sexual orientation. I wonder how many of these male executives are in the closet....really think about it. And why is it okay for a male country singer to get away with committing adultery but not a woman? Think about what happened at the super bowl any years ago...who suffered the most and got all the blame??? It wasn't the male who suggested the move that shocked the audience. It was the woman and shame on those who vilified her for that but never took the male to task. At the end of the book Ms. Moss includes a list of songs and the artist who sings it. It's a great list and most if not all of the songs are well worth the listen. Ranging from the late, great Patsy Cline to Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Tanya Tucker, Mickey Guyton, the Chicks, Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, Shania Twain and so many more it's worth the effort to listen to their songs and music and the stories that they tell. And Her Country is well worth the read and think about how more women and their music needs to be on the radio. The music industry has made and continues to huge missteps in this genre and other genres as well.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sam - Read & Buried

    Her Country tackles the unspoken, backward rules of the country music industry with regard to female artists, and does so by tracking the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton. I'm from the same hometown as Kacey Musgraves, and while prior to reading this book I was only vaguely familiar with her music, she's always been an artist I've rooted for as a local inspiration. Morris and Guyton I had no previous knowledge of, but I'm glad that this book has changed that! It shouldn Her Country tackles the unspoken, backward rules of the country music industry with regard to female artists, and does so by tracking the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton. I'm from the same hometown as Kacey Musgraves, and while prior to reading this book I was only vaguely familiar with her music, she's always been an artist I've rooted for as a local inspiration. Morris and Guyton I had no previous knowledge of, but I'm glad that this book has changed that! It shouldn't be a surprise to anyone, much less those of us who have tuned into country radio in the last decade and a half, that there is a general disinterest within the industry in female/Black/LGBTQ+ artists. Moss does a solid job of examining this through the lens of three artists' careers, and how they each have bucked the trends of the industry. There is background information provided for those of us who either haven't listened to country music since the early aughts - like myself - or those who aren't familiar with the scene at all. That being said, I do think the information could have been organized a little better. It's clear that there is a lot of material Moss could have covered in this book, and it seems like the book can't quite decide whether it wants to analyze the country music industry or follow the careers of Musgraves, Morris, and Guyton. These two strands aren't brought together enough to make it a solid thread, and this can result in sections feeling a little disjointed. There are also parts that feel a little like information overload or seem dry, but I honestly come to expect that from nonfiction at this point, so I'm not counting that against the book. Overall, I'm glad I read this! I have been listening to Kacey non-stop ever since, and have created a playlist with Morris, Guyton, and other artists mentioned in the book that I had either never heard of or had long forgotten. I'd recommend this read for anyone interested in country/Texas music, female artists, or for more information about the country music industry. Thank you to Henry Holt and Co. and LibraryThing Early Reviewers for providing a copy for review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam Hughes

    First of all I wanted thank Henry Holt and Company and Marissa R. Moss for sending me this beautiful Hardcover Copy of Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be. I will forever showcase this on my coffee-table and continue to purchase for my sisters in yall-ternative music interests! Her Country tells the tale of how so difficult it is to be a woman, and especially in an industry such as Country music that is so entirely dominated by men... The First of all I wanted thank Henry Holt and Company and Marissa R. Moss for sending me this beautiful Hardcover Copy of Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be. I will forever showcase this on my coffee-table and continue to purchase for my sisters in yall-ternative music interests! Her Country tells the tale of how so difficult it is to be a woman, and especially in an industry such as Country music that is so entirely dominated by men... The greats like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Jr., and even Willie Nelson have all sang about breaking the law, murder, and outlaw-ship, but god-forbid when The Chicks sing about combatting domestic violence with their radio-banned hit "Goodbye Earl" (which is still one of my favorites to this day and my husband jams along in the car with me when it comes on the radio!) But like seriously why is the Country Music Industry so sexist, but taking that further why are they so homophobic, racist, and so averse to progressive values??? Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Patsy Cline, and so many other of my idols help to start the foundation of Women in Country, but its young, liberal women of today's country scene that have worked to access change and open up doors for those who don't identify as the industry's traditionalist artists. Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton and so many more fantastic women are standing up for social change and backing marginalized groups who need the support of women with a real platform. I feel so empowered after reading this beauty of a book and can't wait to tune into the playlist that's listed in the back of the book, starting off with Shania Twain's "Man, I Feel Like a Woman!"

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    SMASH THE PATRIARCHY! just kidding (sorta). Hey, Mickey, the good-ol'-boy system of Country Radio/Music Row isn't burned to the ground, but I see smoke! Her Story covers the inequalities in country music faced by women. The 'stand still, look, pretty, don't have an opinion' model for women to abide by is a real thing. This model is fading or at least on the right trajectory thanks to strong female voices in the industry who refuse to conform to the idea that country music looks and sounds a certa SMASH THE PATRIARCHY! just kidding (sorta). Hey, Mickey, the good-ol'-boy system of Country Radio/Music Row isn't burned to the ground, but I see smoke! Her Story covers the inequalities in country music faced by women. The 'stand still, look, pretty, don't have an opinion' model for women to abide by is a real thing. This model is fading or at least on the right trajectory thanks to strong female voices in the industry who refuse to conform to the idea that country music looks and sounds a certain way without any room for individuality. Her Story also touches on race inequality in country music and the uneasiness(?) surrounding LGBTQ+ artists in a genre that is not known for inclusivity. It took a while for me to get through this book because I would find myself going down a rabbit hole of music listening sessions during each chapter or watching (rewatching for the millionth time) the amazing collaboration of Beyonce and The Chicks on the CMA Awards. There's a kick-ass playlist at the end of the book. A lot of the artists make my play rotation regularly (Ashley McBryde!), but there are some new ones that I'm happy to be introduced to: Reyna Roberts, Margo Price, Sturgill Simpson (hell yeah!). It's unfortunate to read about the practices of the Country Music Industry related to artistic suppression. I do hope it changes for the better especially with influential voices not willing to Shut Up, but who will Sing/Write/Talk/Tweet/Post/Create/Perform. Hey all, go see a live show! Go early to see the opening act(s). Go to a Festival, enjoy the second stage as well as the main one :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    christines-to-be___

    As a huge fan of what I call alternative country, meaning music that has a country sound but is not played on country radio, I was excited to hear that Marissa Moss was going to tackle this issue of the extreme lack of diversity on country radio which reinforces why I gave up on country radio a long time ago. This book is much needed, and I really hope that it changes a few (hundred or thousand or tens of thousand) minds about this stupid metaphor of women being the tomato in the country salad. U As a huge fan of what I call alternative country, meaning music that has a country sound but is not played on country radio, I was excited to hear that Marissa Moss was going to tackle this issue of the extreme lack of diversity on country radio which reinforces why I gave up on country radio a long time ago. This book is much needed, and I really hope that it changes a few (hundred or thousand or tens of thousand) minds about this stupid metaphor of women being the tomato in the country salad. UGH! My fear, though, is that the men (and women who sidle up to these men to get/maintain the smallest shred of power they have) who really need to read this won't. In fact, they will no doubt attack Marissa for being a "New York Jew who doesn't know real country:" a typical attack on anyone that dares question the status quo in Nashville. Don't get me started on the misogyny and racism that is rampant in a lot of entertainment genres, not just country music, but the focus here is the women of country and how their careers and lives are affected by the people at the top. Moss focuses on Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves, but Miranda Lambert and others play a big role in this book. The timelines could get a bit jumbled, and some stories felt like they ended too soon, but overall this is an intriguing behind-the-scenes look at the women trying to share their "three chords and the truth" with the rest of us. Thank you to NetGalley and Henry Holt for the ARC. Now, excuse me while I go buy some music from Margo Price, Rissi Palmer, Brittney Spencer and SO MANY others!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    If you’re a superfan of Maren Morris or think Kacey Musgraves is the second coming, this is the book for you. If you’re looking for a book that delves into Mickey Guyton’s background at all, this isn’t it. Guyton is mentioned throughout but it’s almost always as a footnote after major coverage of Morris or Musgraves. The books sets out (and manages) to highlight the inequalities for women in modern country music and the roadblocks that are (often purposely) put in their way. It’s well researched If you’re a superfan of Maren Morris or think Kacey Musgraves is the second coming, this is the book for you. If you’re looking for a book that delves into Mickey Guyton’s background at all, this isn’t it. Guyton is mentioned throughout but it’s almost always as a footnote after major coverage of Morris or Musgraves. The books sets out (and manages) to highlight the inequalities for women in modern country music and the roadblocks that are (often purposely) put in their way. It’s well researched and well reported, but something about it felt a little too…fannish. Marin and especially Kacey are treated throughout the book as if they’re the saving graces of country music or as if they’re the first women to accomplish anything in the genre, as if no one else could or would ever accomplish anything Kacey Musgraves has done, as if dhe is singlehandedly “saving” country music. That’s just not a realistic take and if you knew nothing about country music other than reading this book, you wouldn’t get a full picture. There’s an odd fascination with the fact that Musgraves proudly smokes weed. It’s mentioned at least eight or nine times. It’s 2022. This isn’t newsworthy. The bones are good, to borrow a Maren Morris lyric, but this could’ve worked better if it was written a little cleaner and without such an obvious stance of putting these women, especially the white ones, up on a pedestal.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I loved this book so much. I grew up listening to country music and country radio with my mom, especially the Chicks. I felt like it wasn’t necessarily for me though as a young girl, who had started counting how many songs passed before they played one by a woman. Reading Her Country felt like someone was listening to the thoughts I’ve been having since middle school. Moss does an amazing job weaving the stories of all these talented artists together, from the shunning and eventual return of the I loved this book so much. I grew up listening to country music and country radio with my mom, especially the Chicks. I felt like it wasn’t necessarily for me though as a young girl, who had started counting how many songs passed before they played one by a woman. Reading Her Country felt like someone was listening to the thoughts I’ve been having since middle school. Moss does an amazing job weaving the stories of all these talented artists together, from the shunning and eventual return of the Chicks, to Maren and Kaceys fight to the top and Mickey’s long journey into the spotlight as well. She deftly weaves in pop culture and political moments, as well as amazing little gems of details. I loved the descriptions of the close knit community created by the “rebels” of Nashville, making their own space in a world that tends to reject them. I would recommend this book to anyone who cares about country music, about the entertainment industry, or about equality on a systemic level. I really appreciated the consistent reminder that of how much more challenging breaking into country music for Black women, queer women, or anyone else that falls outside what’s “acceptable” in the industry.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard D’Orazi

    As someone who is not a country person but has heard a lot about the prevalent sexism in country music, Her Country is a great eye opener into the practices of the country music industry like not playing women often on the radio to typical industry harassment. The author highlights three female artists from the past decade: Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton and how they have found success in the face of industry pushback with all of them becoming some of country’s biggest artists As someone who is not a country person but has heard a lot about the prevalent sexism in country music, Her Country is a great eye opener into the practices of the country music industry like not playing women often on the radio to typical industry harassment. The author highlights three female artists from the past decade: Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton and how they have found success in the face of industry pushback with all of them becoming some of country’s biggest artists without playing much of the industry game. Even without industry support, all three artists have been making their mark with acclaimed albums and songs, winning major award like Kacey winning the Grammy Album of the Year for Golden Hour, making crossover moves with Maren Morris’ Top 5 Zedd EDM collab “The Middle,” and playing to big crowds as if they were regular chart toppers. It’s a look into the modern history of country music in its old fashioned narrow casting that has put women and Black artists at a disadvantage but reading Her Country will make you hopeful for the genre’s future as a more inclusive and diverse place with the leadership and trajectories of the three artists profiled.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maryann

    If you're a county music fan then you'll want to check this one out. Written by an award-winning journalist, this nonfiction dives into the topic of gender and race inequality on the country music scene. Until I read this I never really thought about how most of my favorite genre comes from one group of people - white males. Weather solo artists or groups, that is what dominates country radio. The radio is the way most stars are born. Listen in and you'll be surprised - only one maybe two women f If you're a county music fan then you'll want to check this one out. Written by an award-winning journalist, this nonfiction dives into the topic of gender and race inequality on the country music scene. Until I read this I never really thought about how most of my favorite genre comes from one group of people - white males. Weather solo artists or groups, that is what dominates country radio. The radio is the way most stars are born. Listen in and you'll be surprised - only one maybe two women for every dozen of more male songs are played. Forget about anyone of color or an LGBT+ artist. The author brought so many new artists to light for me. A few I had heard of for a single. But many more I had to look up. Strong, poetic, beautiful voices I had never heard. Why? Just because they're not part of the "good ol boys" club? It's 2022, you'd think we were farther than that. Sadly, we are not. Pick up Her Country to learn more about the country music industry, the artists that haven't gotten the spotlight they deserve and to add to your playlist.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abra Kurt

    Extensively researched and with dozens upon dozens of personal interviews and firsthand accounts, Moss delivers a vividly drawn portrait of three iconic women breaking the rules of country music. While putting under a microscope the sexism and endless other forms of inherent bias that seek to marginalize progressive artists and sabotage promising careers, Her Country also explores the artifice of patriotism and common man-ness constructed by an industry that makes its living by unconsciously sto Extensively researched and with dozens upon dozens of personal interviews and firsthand accounts, Moss delivers a vividly drawn portrait of three iconic women breaking the rules of country music. While putting under a microscope the sexism and endless other forms of inherent bias that seek to marginalize progressive artists and sabotage promising careers, Her Country also explores the artifice of patriotism and common man-ness constructed by an industry that makes its living by unconsciously stoking the flames of division and "otherness." This would have been five stars for me if Moss had gone further to shine a light on the next generation of artists coming up in the wake of the trailblazers featured here - and maybe offered a something in the way of a call to action for readers. How can readers and country music fans help to change things? And, photos would have added another dimension. Moss's writing is solid and clever in unexpected ways, but there can be a bit of repetitiveness to some of her points and supporting evidence. Where I'd offer the most critique, however, is with the publisher's decision to go with such a binary title in a book that's so heavily focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Overall, this is an important read and lifts the veil for readers who may unfamiliar with how the music business - and specifically country music - operates and wields its power. I received a digital pre-publication copy of this book in exchange for an honest review, and I'll be including it in a TBR round-up for Women's History Month in March.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    I grew up listening to 90s country, which was full of powerful women's voices: Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, The Dixie Chicks (now The Chicks), and many more. Although I no longer regularly listen to country music--other than attending some bluegrass concerts in my area--I was intrigued by this look at the major disparities and difficulties modern female country singers, especially those who are Black and/or LGBTQ+, face. Moss has a rich narrative writing style that immediately pulls you in as yo I grew up listening to 90s country, which was full of powerful women's voices: Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, The Dixie Chicks (now The Chicks), and many more. Although I no longer regularly listen to country music--other than attending some bluegrass concerts in my area--I was intrigued by this look at the major disparities and difficulties modern female country singers, especially those who are Black and/or LGBTQ+, face. Moss has a rich narrative writing style that immediately pulls you in as you follow these enormously talented and hardworking performers through ups and downs. Although country music fans who are concerned about the current state of mainstream country music are its primary audience, this will be enjoyed by anyone interested in books covering the entertainment industry. Many thanks to Henry Holt and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book looks at the country music industry and how except for a brief period in the 90s women have essentially been shut out, especially if they don't want to play by the rules that the men in charge have made for them. It mostly focuses on Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris and how they have created careers for themselves by not playing by the rules. For Musgraves and Guyton that has mostly meant living on the outside of the traditional country music machine while Morris has ma This book looks at the country music industry and how except for a brief period in the 90s women have essentially been shut out, especially if they don't want to play by the rules that the men in charge have made for them. It mostly focuses on Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris and how they have created careers for themselves by not playing by the rules. For Musgraves and Guyton that has mostly meant living on the outside of the traditional country music machine while Morris has managed to be one of the few women to break in despite trying to do her own thing. I don't know that I learned a whole lot from the book other than stuff about their early lives, but it was a really well written and engaging book that shines yet another spotlight on how messed up the country music industry is. As someone who grew up and fell in love with country music during the hey day of women's country, I sincerely hope things can get back there one day.

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