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In the Dark We Forget

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A jolting psychological suspense novel from an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer about missing parents, a winning lottery ticket and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive. Some things are better left forgotten . . . When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her pa A jolting psychological suspense novel from an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer about missing parents, a winning lottery ticket and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive. Some things are better left forgotten . . . When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her parents have disappeared—not long after her mother bought a winning $47 million lottery ticket. As her memories painfully resurface and the police uncover details of her parents’ mysterious disappearance, Cleo Li finds herself under increasing suspicion. Even with the unwavering support of her brother, she can’t quite reconcile her fears with reality or keep the harrowing nightmares at bay. As Cleo delves deeper for the truth, she cannot escape the nagging sense that maybe the person she should be afraid of...is herself. With jolting revelations and taut ambiguity, In the Dark We Forget vividly examines the complexities of family—and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive.


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A jolting psychological suspense novel from an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer about missing parents, a winning lottery ticket and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive. Some things are better left forgotten . . . When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her pa A jolting psychological suspense novel from an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer about missing parents, a winning lottery ticket and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive. Some things are better left forgotten . . . When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her parents have disappeared—not long after her mother bought a winning $47 million lottery ticket. As her memories painfully resurface and the police uncover details of her parents’ mysterious disappearance, Cleo Li finds herself under increasing suspicion. Even with the unwavering support of her brother, she can’t quite reconcile her fears with reality or keep the harrowing nightmares at bay. As Cleo delves deeper for the truth, she cannot escape the nagging sense that maybe the person she should be afraid of...is herself. With jolting revelations and taut ambiguity, In the Dark We Forget vividly examines the complexities of family—and the lies we tell ourselves in order to survive.

30 review for In the Dark We Forget

  1. 4 out of 5

    Krista crone

    First, I have to say the cover is everything 😍. It is just gorgeous and it matches the book so well! This is a great thriller debut! It starts out with a 💥 with Cleo waking up with amnesia on the side of the road! It slowly builds up momentum but is a great psychological suspense/whodunnit mystery! I loved all of the cultural elements scattered through and the Canadian setting. The family dynamic was so raw, painful, and emotional but really made the plot so suspenseful. Without giving anything a First, I have to say the cover is everything 😍. It is just gorgeous and it matches the book so well! This is a great thriller debut! It starts out with a 💥 with Cleo waking up with amnesia on the side of the road! It slowly builds up momentum but is a great psychological suspense/whodunnit mystery! I loved all of the cultural elements scattered through and the Canadian setting. The family dynamic was so raw, painful, and emotional but really made the plot so suspenseful. Without giving anything away, I will say that during the big reveal, my spidey senses were going off and I was on edge, goosebumps and heart racing! Now that is great writing and a major page-turner. The ending was kind of vague but it left you thinking, which I loved! If you are looking for a great psychological suspense, definitely add this to your TBR! I cannot wait to see what Sandra SG Wong comes up with next! ***** Many thanks to Harper Collins, Harper 360, and Sandra SG Wong for the gifted copy as it was provided to me in turn for my honest opinion.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heather Adores Books

    3.5⭐ rounded up for this debut. A lady wakes up in a ditch and has no clue who she is or how she got there. She makes it to a police station, gives her statement, gets an exam by a physician and finds out she was drugged. As the police investigate what happened to her they learn that her name is Cleopatra the same time they learn her parents are missing. Luckily they find a piece of paper with a man's name on it, which turns out to be Cleo's brother, Cassius. Since Cleo's memory is shot and her b 3.5⭐ rounded up for this debut. A lady wakes up in a ditch and has no clue who she is or how she got there. She makes it to a police station, gives her statement, gets an exam by a physician and finds out she was drugged. As the police investigate what happened to her they learn that her name is Cleopatra the same time they learn her parents are missing. Luckily they find a piece of paper with a man's name on it, which turns out to be Cleo's brother, Cassius. Since Cleo's memory is shot and her brother, Cass, was somewhat estranged from their parents there is a lot of speculation as to what might have happened to Stephen and Glinda Li. Does it have anything to do with Glinda recently winning $47 million in the lotto? Or is there something more dark going on? Is Cleo really the terrible person her ex co-workers are making her out to be? The story is told solely by our unreliable narrator, Cleo, in 3 parts. 1 & 2 were a little on the slow side for me, but the story really picked up with some suspenseful moments in the final part. I'm not too sure about the ending, but that's the clever writing of the author's doing. It was interesting to me that the author felt the need to let readers know each characters ethnicity, especially when someone was white. Was that to really make the cultural aspects of the Chinese Canadian heritage stand out? I did like learning about their culture, though, and it gave me a better understanding of the Li family Anyway, this was a solid psychological debut that will make you wonder whodunit until the chilling end. *Many thanks to Sophia at Harper Collins 360 for sending me a paperback ARC. I am voluntarily leaving my honest review* More reviews here ➡ Heather Adores Books

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel the Page-Turner

    I was hesitant going into this one, because it could have been really cheesy, but it turned out to be better than I expected! The synopsis was true to form; a woman awakens near a highway in Canada, with no idea of her name, where she is, and why she has obviously been attacked. After going to the police, she finds out who she is … and also finds out her parents are missing. They’ve recently won a ton of money in the lottery, so immediately suspicion turns to everyone surrounding them - including I was hesitant going into this one, because it could have been really cheesy, but it turned out to be better than I expected! The synopsis was true to form; a woman awakens near a highway in Canada, with no idea of her name, where she is, and why she has obviously been attacked. After going to the police, she finds out who she is … and also finds out her parents are missing. They’ve recently won a ton of money in the lottery, so immediately suspicion turns to everyone surrounding them - including their own daughter, who is still suffering from amnesia. The book obviously is about finding out what happened, so the rest would be verging into spoiler territory, but it was good. It didn’t blow me away and there were a couple of things that annoyed the hell out of me, so I was planning on giving it 3.5 stars. The rounding would depend upon the end, and as I got there, I decided I’d round down to three stars. THEN … I read the last few pages and generously decided to round up instead! This was a fun story and while not truly a solid four stars from me, it was still a very entertaining read. (Thank you to Harper 360, Sandra SG Wong, and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my review.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kellye

    In the Dark We Forget is a much, much, much needed entry into the psychological suspense genre about a Chinese-Canadian woman who wakes up to find her parents are missing and her memories are gone. The wonderfully talented Sandra SG Wong gives us everything a book lover could want–brutally honest social commentary, rich cultural details, deft psychological suspense, and often heartbreaking family dynamics. The result is a story that will stay with you long after you get to the last word. I could In the Dark We Forget is a much, much, much needed entry into the psychological suspense genre about a Chinese-Canadian woman who wakes up to find her parents are missing and her memories are gone. The wonderfully talented Sandra SG Wong gives us everything a book lover could want–brutally honest social commentary, rich cultural details, deft psychological suspense, and often heartbreaking family dynamics. The result is a story that will stay with you long after you get to the last word. I couldn’t stop reading. Definitely add it to the top of your TBR lists.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This debut novel by Sandra SG Wong is a good psychological suspense novel,and not a thriller. Cleo wakes up by the side of the Trans-Canada Highway in British Columbia--and doesn't know how she got there. She has amnesia. As she tries to regain her memory, she discovers that her parents are missing. I like a good psychological story like this, although it does get intense. That's the reason I don't read very many of this type of story! It moved a little slowly in the second half of the book an This debut novel by Sandra SG Wong is a good psychological suspense novel,and not a thriller. Cleo wakes up by the side of the Trans-Canada Highway in British Columbia--and doesn't know how she got there. She has amnesia. As she tries to regain her memory, she discovers that her parents are missing. I like a good psychological story like this, although it does get intense. That's the reason I don't read very many of this type of story! It moved a little slowly in the second half of the book and I read fast to push through to the end and find out whodunit and what happened. I also liked that it was set in Canada, involving Canadian characters. I realize that I have read many more stories set in England or France-- or Africa or Asia-- than in Canada. I do want to read more about our northern neighbor! THANKS to HarperCollins for this Advanced Reading Copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tammie

    Thank you to HarperCollins Canada for sending me an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review! 3.75 stars Overall, I have to say that I really enjoyed this book a lot. It's a page-turner, which is exactly what I want my thrillers to be like, and the premise and the narrative voice really made me question which characters I could trust all the way through to the end. I think it has all the elements that make domestic psychological thrillers so enjoyable and such a popular genre, while also bri Thank you to HarperCollins Canada for sending me an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review! 3.75 stars Overall, I have to say that I really enjoyed this book a lot. It's a page-turner, which is exactly what I want my thrillers to be like, and the premise and the narrative voice really made me question which characters I could trust all the way through to the end. I think it has all the elements that make domestic psychological thrillers so enjoyable and such a popular genre, while also bringing much more to the table than your typical (white) domestic thriller. In this book, we follow our main character, Cleo, as she wakes up on the side of a highway without any idea who she is or any memories of her past. She soon finds out that her parents are missing, and the suspicious circumstances around their disappearance coupled with her memory loss puts her in a precarious position, and she needs to regain her memories in order to figure out the truth behind what happened. I found myself relating to Cleo a lot, even in the ways that are not necessarily the most positive. I think Wong did a great job with Cleo's character - as you learn more about her, there are things about her that make her seem like a "difficult" person (a bitch, as the people in her life often describe her), but you also can't help but understand where she comes from and why she is the way that she is. Wong also does a great job at weaving in social commentary and showing some of the microaggressions that Chinese-Canadians often face in our day-to-day lives, and it does make you question whether or not Cleo really is as difficult as everyone makes her out to be, or if it's partially because of racism and misogyny. At times, I did find the social commentary to be a bit too on the nose, but overall I still thought it was well done. I was surprised at how emotional the last quarter of this book was for me. There's a big focus throughout the book on Cleo's relationships with both her parents and her brother, and at times, these complicated family dynamics were extremely heartbreaking. There's discussion of emotional and domestic abuse/trauma, in case that is a trigger for anyone. These family dynamics were definitely what made the book memorable for me, and even made me cry a little. All in all, I'm really impressed with this thriller. It's suspenseful and keeps you on your toes, but also gives you a lot to think about in terms of social and cultural commentary. The ending is kind of vague, and Wong definitely doesn't spoon feed you or tie everything up in a neat little package for you, which I personally really love in a book, but I also know that this isn't something that everyone will enjoy. If you are into psychological and/or domestic thrillers at all, I definitely recommend this one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Remarkablylisa)

    I just didn't like this one because everything was being discovered too conveniently and while I love the Asian representation in this one, it threw me off. I just didn't like this one because everything was being discovered too conveniently and while I love the Asian representation in this one, it threw me off.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    2.5 stars. This debut novel was OK but for me it didn’t live up to being a thriller at all. In fact towards the end I skim read as it dragged on. I love trying debut novels as you might find a new fav but sadly this one wasn’t for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily Christopher

    In the Dark We Forget ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Genre: Psychological Thriller Format: Kindle eBook Date Published: 6/21/22 Author: Sandra S.G. Wong Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Pages: 355 Goodreads Rating: 3.33 I requested a digital advanced readers copy from NetGalley and HarperCollins Publishers and providing my opinion voluntarily and unbiased. Synopsis: When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her parents have disapp In the Dark We Forget ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Genre: Psychological Thriller Format: Kindle eBook Date Published: 6/21/22 Author: Sandra S.G. Wong Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Pages: 355 Goodreads Rating: 3.33 I requested a digital advanced readers copy from NetGalley and HarperCollins Publishers and providing my opinion voluntarily and unbiased. Synopsis: When a woman wakes up with amnesia beside a mountain highway, confused and alone, she fights to regain her identity, only to learn that her parents have disappeared—not long after her mother bought a winning $47 million lottery ticket. As her memories painfully resurface and the police uncover details of her parents’ mysterious disappearance, Cleo Li finds herself under increasing suspicion. Even with the unwavering support of her brother, she can’t quite reconcile her fears with reality or keep the harrowing nightmares at bay. As Cleo delves deeper for the truth, she cannot escape the nagging sense that maybe the person she should be afraid of...is herself. My Thoughts: I was immediately drawn to this book by the cover and pretty much I knew I wanted to read without really knowing what the story was. For a debut thriller, just amazing! The story opens up with a firework, then does some back building, and slowly building up the plot, with twists along the way. The story is divided up into three parts and narrated by Cleo, as an unreliable narrator, from her POV. The storytelling of the culture was extremely descriptive and detailed, an aspect that I loved. The characters were very well developed with depth, cultural exploration, mysterious, and just worked so well for this novel. The author’s writing style was complex, with more layers of complexity, suspenseful, tense on the edge of your seat moments, and family dynamics that tear at your heart. The author did a fantastic job at building the characters, layering in the twists while building up to the plot, while the ending was a little vague, I do believe this is just the brilliant writing of the author. I cannot wait to see future novels from Wong. I highly recommend you go pick up this page turning psychological thriller that was released last month.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This was a frustrating one for me. There were things I really liked about the book, like having a Chinese Canadian protagonist and LGBTQ representation. That said, the book really dragged for me. Wong describes everything with such detail that it almost felt like a writing exercise. I don't know if I would have finished the book if I weren't reading it for review and if I didn't really want to find out what happened to Cleo. That brings me to my biggest problem with the book. You don't really fin This was a frustrating one for me. There were things I really liked about the book, like having a Chinese Canadian protagonist and LGBTQ representation. That said, the book really dragged for me. Wong describes everything with such detail that it almost felt like a writing exercise. I don't know if I would have finished the book if I weren't reading it for review and if I didn't really want to find out what happened to Cleo. That brings me to my biggest problem with the book. You don't really find out what happened. WTH? The ending is so ambiguous and I hate ambiguous endings. The main premise is that Cleopatra Li comes to in a desolate part of Canada all banged up with no memories. She makes her way to the police and eventually finds out who she is and that her parents are missing. They determine that she's been drugged with rohypnol, but that doesn't explain the lack of her long term memories. We then go with Cleo and she tries to figure out what happened to her and to her parents, and accompany her as she finds out what a terrible person she used to be. I appreciated the social commentary that others have noted. I don't have any experience as a Chinese Canadian woman and this really helped me see a lot of the culture and her family dynamics. But the ending left me with no less than 12 unanswered questions, most of them very big ones. That was a real disappointment for me. In the end, it felt more like a really long character study with shades of unresolved mystery thrown in. I read a digital ARC of this book for review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marie Barr

    3.5 stars rounded up. Great debut from a Canadian author. Loved how this was a story of a Chinese Canadian, and describes the struggles she has faced all her life, both from family and others. There needs to be more on these topics. Felt the book slow to start but loved how brother/ sister always had each other’s backs. Hope to see more from this author. Eye opening look behind the curtains of this fictional family, wouldn’t be surprised to see if this parallels real instances.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I was really hoping to love this debut psychological suspense book featuring an Asian Canadian family and the daughter who wakes up with memory loss and is found wandering around the forest in B.C. Slowly we learn what happened to bring Cleo to the woods, there is a lot of commentary on microaggressions and anti-Asian racism. I liked the complex relationship between Cleo and her brother and Cleo and the sole Asian policewoman on the investigation. Overall though I found the story dragged a bit a I was really hoping to love this debut psychological suspense book featuring an Asian Canadian family and the daughter who wakes up with memory loss and is found wandering around the forest in B.C. Slowly we learn what happened to bring Cleo to the woods, there is a lot of commentary on microaggressions and anti-Asian racism. I liked the complex relationship between Cleo and her brother and Cleo and the sole Asian policewoman on the investigation. Overall though I found the story dragged a bit and could have been more suspenseful - at least for my tastes. I will still be eagerly waiting to read what's next by this talented Canadian author though! Much thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for an early digital copy in exchange for my honest review!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hannah McKinnon

    With IN THE DARK WE FORGET, Sandra SG Wong delivers a heart-pounding must-read amnesia mystery. Chilling, timely, and deeply atmospheric, you'll question everything and everyone throughout as you race to the end. Masterful! With IN THE DARK WE FORGET, Sandra SG Wong delivers a heart-pounding must-read amnesia mystery. Chilling, timely, and deeply atmospheric, you'll question everything and everyone throughout as you race to the end. Masterful!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Thanks to Harper Collins Canada for providing me with a free advance copy of In the Dark We Forget in exchange for an honest review. I don't read a lot of mystery books, but I was really excited for this one because it's by a Canadian author and set in the Canadian Rockies! The premise of the book is very intriguing. A young Asian-Canadian woman wakes up in the woods with no memory of where she is or how she got there. As she starts to remember some of the details, including that her name is Cle Thanks to Harper Collins Canada for providing me with a free advance copy of In the Dark We Forget in exchange for an honest review. I don't read a lot of mystery books, but I was really excited for this one because it's by a Canadian author and set in the Canadian Rockies! The premise of the book is very intriguing. A young Asian-Canadian woman wakes up in the woods with no memory of where she is or how she got there. As she starts to remember some of the details, including that her name is Cleo, we learn that her parents recently won the lottery and that they are now missing too. As the police delve deeper and find little information, we begin to question Cleo's relationship to both her parents and their disappearance. Sadly the premise was the most compelling part of the book. This is being sold as a mystery-thriller, but I think it would have worked a lot better as literary fiction (and to be honest, I think that's what the author was going for as well). Wong had some great ideas in terms of theme and characters, but the plotting of the book really just didn't work for what I felt she was trying to accomplish. This could have been a moderately interesting book about diaspora and Asian-Canadian culture if it had been further and better developed, but instead it's a poor mystery novel that bogs itself down with poor writing. I do really hate to rag on the book because it is a debut, but I can't deny the writing wasn't strong. I was expecting this to be really fast paced, but it's actually incredibly slow and boring because the author insists on taking us on an almost totally linear trajectory, with no time jumps between scenes to move the story along. While everything before Cleo's accident is foggy in her memory, every second after is accounted for in great detail. I felt like there was a lot of pointless filler and it really made the book drag. It took way too long for us to find out anything meaningful about Cleo. If you're going to center a mystery around a family dynamic, you can't waste 100 pages before even revealing who any of the characters are. I honestly felt like barely anything happened in the entire book. The author gives up absolutely nothing in terms of the mystery element, which is why I questioned why it's shelved as mystery. You have to give your reader some details to keep them interested and guessing, but this book presents the scenario and then does almost nothing to advance the details. It has a very ambiguous ending, which can work in a literary fiction, but I thought felt very out of place in a mystery. It's not ambiguous in the way that it leaves me wondering which of 2 scenarios might have occurred, but ambiguous in the way that I have literally no idea what actually happened. I feel that there should be some kind of payout at the end of the book, but I didn't even get that, so it really left me frustrated at why I had invested so much time in the book when absolutely none of the questions presented in the synopsis of the book are answered. Anyways, I don't want to go on and on. It was a disappointing read for me, but others might like it. Go into this knowing it's definitely not a thriller and only partially a mystery. If I'd taken a different approach I might have liked it a bit more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    As much as I wanted to love this book, it missed the mark for me. The premise is great, though as some others have already pointed out, it's more of a mystery than a thriller since so much of the book takes place after the crime. There are sporadic flashbacks as Cleo regains her memory, but not enough to be a full-on thriller. What I struggled with was the writing. There was no connecting to Cleo for me. I found her too bitter and angry which, of course, is to be expected given her situation, bu As much as I wanted to love this book, it missed the mark for me. The premise is great, though as some others have already pointed out, it's more of a mystery than a thriller since so much of the book takes place after the crime. There are sporadic flashbacks as Cleo regains her memory, but not enough to be a full-on thriller. What I struggled with was the writing. There was no connecting to Cleo for me. I found her too bitter and angry which, of course, is to be expected given her situation, but that bitterness laced everything including things aside from the plot. There was just an overall edge to the narration that rubbed me the wrong way and didn't make for pleasant reading. As far as the plot goes, I would have enjoyed it more had we been able to follow Cleo as her predicament was happening. I do love the amnesia angle, it just didn't have the same urgency having everything said and done to start. My best takeaway was Cleo reconnecting with her brother. That part was very sweet. Thanks to HarperCollins/Harper 360 for sending me a free copy of the book to read and review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Thank you to HarperCollins for the ARC of this book! Cleo Li wakes up on side of a road, not knowing what happened to her, how she got there, or who she is. Her amnesia means she fails to remember where she lives, who her relatives are, or anything else about herself. She is confused and feels alone. When she enters a lodge one day, trying to figure out what happened to her, she meets an employee there who knows who she is; but that employee has some terrible news. Her parents are missing. With t Thank you to HarperCollins for the ARC of this book! Cleo Li wakes up on side of a road, not knowing what happened to her, how she got there, or who she is. Her amnesia means she fails to remember where she lives, who her relatives are, or anything else about herself. She is confused and feels alone. When she enters a lodge one day, trying to figure out what happened to her, she meets an employee there who knows who she is; but that employee has some terrible news. Her parents are missing. With the help of her brother, and the police, they are determined to find out what happened to Cleo and what happened to her parents. She soon learns her mother won a $47 million lottery, but had yet to claim the money. As Cleo’s memories begin to resurface, she remembers the details of her relationship with her mother. Cleo soon finds herself under suspicion of her parents’ disappearance, but was she the cause? This is a fantastic debut novel! It starts out with a bang, and the suspense as to the whodunit is kept throughout. I, of course, had my own suspicions, but I was very, very wrong! That is exactly what I want in a thriller novel. Wong did a great job of scattering cultural references and discriminations within the novel; as I admit, not very many thriller novels involve Asian characters. It was a nice change, and a much needed one. I also enjoyed that this took place in Canada, as most books I read take place in Europe. Wong has entered the scene with a fresh, new voice that is missing and much needed. The ONLY reason I didn’t give this book a 5 star rating, is that I wish the end was cleaned up a little better – it was left slightly open ended and I wanted a little more resolution.

  17. 4 out of 5

    theliterateleprechaun

    I’ve made it a priority this year to read more books written by Canadian authors. I’m excited to have found Sandra SG Wong, an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer. Her most recent book, In The Dark We Forget, is listed on CBC’s Canadian fiction must reads. Can you imagine waking up on the side of the road (yes, your cheek on the pavement!) on a deserted mountain highway, confused, alone and not knowing who or where you are? You have no wallet and no cell phone. After fighting to regain h I’ve made it a priority this year to read more books written by Canadian authors. I’m excited to have found Sandra SG Wong, an up-and-coming Chinese-Canadian crime writer. Her most recent book, In The Dark We Forget, is listed on CBC’s Canadian fiction must reads. Can you imagine waking up on the side of the road (yes, your cheek on the pavement!) on a deserted mountain highway, confused, alone and not knowing who or where you are? You have no wallet and no cell phone. After fighting to regain her memory, ‘Jane Doe’ discovers that her parents are missing after they’ve won $47 million in the lottery. Readers will follow this woman through every step of the process as she struggles to uncover details of her identity. I was hooked right from the beginning. Was it curiosity? A skilled writer? Both? Regardless, I followed along as if the woman in question was me and I was fighting to regain memories. I was clenching my teeth, sitting on my leg (and it was tingling from numbness), and oblivious to everything around me….completely absorbed in this tale! I loved that my hometown was mentioned in the book as well as many places that I’ve travelled to in my province. It was refreshing to read about a Chinese protagonist in a crime novel and I appreciated the nods to her culture, the tension filled family dynamics, and the added stress a huge lottery win and mysterious disappearances brought to the narrative. Even as I settled down after the final twist and read the last sentence, I still wasn’t convinced that I knew what happened. This will be with me for quite some time and I’ll definitely read another book by this author. I was gifted this advance copy by Sandra SG Wong, HarperCollins Canada, and NetGalley and was under no obligation to provide a review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Dang

    Amnesia, a mystery, and missing family members. Cleo wakes up in the woods with injuries and no memory of what has happened to her. She soon discovers that her parents are missing and that their disappearance isn’t as normal as she thought and it might be connected to her missing memory. Soon she finds herself trying to find out what happened to them and regain her memories. cleo isn’t exactly a likable character and you learn that she is a bit of a bitch as people in her life would describe her Amnesia, a mystery, and missing family members. Cleo wakes up in the woods with injuries and no memory of what has happened to her. She soon discovers that her parents are missing and that their disappearance isn’t as normal as she thought and it might be connected to her missing memory. Soon she finds herself trying to find out what happened to them and regain her memories. cleo isn’t exactly a likable character and you learn that she is a bit of a bitch as people in her life would describe her. The story also has a lot of social commentary and shows some of the micro-aggressions that Chinese-Canadians face as well as the way abuse and toxic family works. There was emotional and discussion on domestic abuse and trauma. The author weaves in experiences of BIPOC and members of the LGBTQ community. The thriller aspect was a bit slower for my liking and the mystery was okay and it definitely felt like more of a family based drama with a touch of forgotten identity. The ending felt ambiguous which I wish it had more of a solid ending. *Thank you Harper360 for sending me an arc in exchange for an honest review*

  19. 5 out of 5

    Penelope

    "In the Dark We Forget" is a slow burn that seems to rest somewhere between mystery and thriller. Who is Chloe? Is she hiding something? Does she really not remember who she is? Who can be trusted? There were many things I like about this book, such as the setting, the premise, and the clean writing. I also enjoyed that I wasn't always rooting for the main character - I am a sucker for an unreliable narrator, especially one that keeps secrets from the reader. I would have liked this book to pick a "In the Dark We Forget" is a slow burn that seems to rest somewhere between mystery and thriller. Who is Chloe? Is she hiding something? Does she really not remember who she is? Who can be trusted? There were many things I like about this book, such as the setting, the premise, and the clean writing. I also enjoyed that I wasn't always rooting for the main character - I am a sucker for an unreliable narrator, especially one that keeps secrets from the reader. I would have liked this book to pick a lane in terms of genre, however. It was too dialogue-driven and slow-paced to be my ideal thriller, but didn't contain enough of an "aha!" reveal to qualify as the kind of mystery I personally enjoy. I would recommend this title for readers who like family-based dramas and "forgotten-identity" reads. It is also a book I'd suggest for readers looking for a uniquely Canadian setting and perspective.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ceylan (CeyGo)

    ✖️ an unlikeable narrator ; a lot of repetitive dialogue ; amnesia and inconclusive ending ..there’s a lot more I could say about this book but I will keep it to myself Needless to say it really didn’t work for me

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mehva

    This is a very well written slow burn thriller. It was sometimes hard to read as the main character struggled with amnesia and for part of the story not much was happening but the build up. Who is she, is she a good person, a victim, a perpetrator and is anyone just one thing. The ending was ambiguous, so left with questions about what happened, which isn't my favorite 4.5 This is a very well written slow burn thriller. It was sometimes hard to read as the main character struggled with amnesia and for part of the story not much was happening but the build up. Who is she, is she a good person, a victim, a perpetrator and is anyone just one thing. The ending was ambiguous, so left with questions about what happened, which isn't my favorite 4.5

  22. 4 out of 5

    Char

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you very much to Harper Collins Canada for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is my very first ARC. Overall I enjoyed the book. I will not recap the synopsis as that can be easily found and read. I loved the setting in Field, BC. I have been to Takkakaw Falls many times and I always stop to see the confluence and the spiral tunnels. The story moved at a fast pace, which I always appreciate. Wong has some social commentary throughout the book, which w Thank you very much to Harper Collins Canada for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is my very first ARC. Overall I enjoyed the book. I will not recap the synopsis as that can be easily found and read. I loved the setting in Field, BC. I have been to Takkakaw Falls many times and I always stop to see the confluence and the spiral tunnels. The story moved at a fast pace, which I always appreciate. Wong has some social commentary throughout the book, which was all on point. As far as it being a “thriller”, I’m not so sure as I didn’t believe Cleo, the protagonist, was in imminent danger. I think it would qualify as more of a “mystery”. There were several things in the story that requires suspended disbelief, for example the RCMP travelling from Kelowna to Edmonton, and Cleo’s relationship with Naomi (this was hard to accept). Also, I had a tough time wrapping my head around Cleo not sharing the identity of her attacker when her memories came back, it took her approximately the last 1/3 of the book before she shared this information. Wong ticked as many boxes as possible regarding the race of her characters (this pulled me out of the story) as well as ticking a few LGBTQ+ boxes. The ending is ambiguous which is not the case for a traditional mystery.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Twisty and fascinating. I wish the ending had been somewhat less ambiguous but eh. Overall a fun read. Full review on my blog: https://literarytreats.com/2022/06/03... Twisty and fascinating. I wish the ending had been somewhat less ambiguous but eh. Overall a fun read. Full review on my blog: https://literarytreats.com/2022/06/03...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you for the ARC of this, just in time for the long weekend. In the Dark We Forget put a twist on the unreliable narrator by giving her amnesia. Cleo wakes up battered and with no memory at the foot of the mountains in BC. While learning who she is and how she got there, she discovers that her parents are missing and her own assault is likely connected. I agree with other reviewers, this is more of a mystery than thriller. It had plenty of twists and turns and it kept me engaged right until Thank you for the ARC of this, just in time for the long weekend. In the Dark We Forget put a twist on the unreliable narrator by giving her amnesia. Cleo wakes up battered and with no memory at the foot of the mountains in BC. While learning who she is and how she got there, she discovers that her parents are missing and her own assault is likely connected. I agree with other reviewers, this is more of a mystery than thriller. It had plenty of twists and turns and it kept me engaged right until the end. But it still fell a little flat. A few things seemed unresolved, like Cleo’s relationship with one of the constables and how she ended up in BC. Other things seemed like they would be important, but were never explained, such as Cleo speaking aloud without realizing it. All and all, a fun easy read for the summer, though.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kori Potenzone

    How is this a debut novel? Sandra SG Wong, delivers! In the Dark We Forget, was so well done I kept going back to google this author to make sure I had not missed any previous work. I was completely consumed from page one until the very last page. The narration was done with perfection. The pace was done so well and kept me engaged and interested in what was going to happen next. This book is classified perfect as a thriller and had me on the edge of my seat, chewing at my finger tips the entire How is this a debut novel? Sandra SG Wong, delivers! In the Dark We Forget, was so well done I kept going back to google this author to make sure I had not missed any previous work. I was completely consumed from page one until the very last page. The narration was done with perfection. The pace was done so well and kept me engaged and interested in what was going to happen next. This book is classified perfect as a thriller and had me on the edge of my seat, chewing at my finger tips the entire time. I fell in love with Cleo, she was a multi-dimensional character that just seemed "oh so real" . The development over time made her even more realistic. In the Dark We Forget is destined for the bestsellers list and many kudos to the author for starting out her career with such a bang. You made a lifetime fan out of me

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Johnson

    Intellectually stimulating, explosive, Compelling, griping, exhilarating & intense! This story brought out all the feels & the emotions! On top of all that this phenomenal Asian Canadian author has had the courage to write about many topics that need much more light shed on them, due to the general public's lack of knowledge (with knowledge comes not only understanding but hopefully compassion, caring & acceptance) so I for one thank you Sandra! In the dark we forget, is this a reference to what Intellectually stimulating, explosive, Compelling, griping, exhilarating & intense! This story brought out all the feels & the emotions! On top of all that this phenomenal Asian Canadian author has had the courage to write about many topics that need much more light shed on them, due to the general public's lack of knowledge (with knowledge comes not only understanding but hopefully compassion, caring & acceptance) so I for one thank you Sandra! In the dark we forget, is this a reference to what Cleo's mother did to her, how her father was to afraid to stop it? The behind closed doors and all deal? Or subjectively could this be in reference to how we as a society treat people who have emigrated to Canada? (and I'm ashamed that this is true I wish with all my heart that it were not) I would love to sit down with Sandra SG Wong and ask her about the title of the book because it's the first thing that drew me in, but then her amazing, flowing, dramatic, precise writing style hooked me in chapter one and boy did I hang on with everything that I had right till the end of the epilog! I absolutely loved the issues that were brought up in this book such as the way Asian Canadians are treated and or looked upon in society (which is disgraceful), how the female children are treated in an Asian family (I can't imagine how damaging that must be to self esteem & mental health) LGBTQIA issues in general are an iffy topic because it's hard not to offend people and I think this author had to be brave to write about how the Asian community reacted years ago as well as how they react now and it was brilliant to show both sides of how that made the siblings in this story feel, what it was like being disowned also how hard it was to explain not having your parents at your wedding. There were a lot of twists & turns in the story that were shocking, dramatic & heart wrenching and of course I just wanted more more more. I would recommend this book to anyone who dislikes injustice, prejudice or racism that enjoys a good on the edge of your seat mystery or psychological thriller. I sincerely thank @NetGalley, @HarperCollinsCa and @S_G_Wong for THE ARC of this fantastic book. #IntheDarkWeForget

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pirkko

    Sandra SG Wong: In The Dark We Forget book review: Thank You to Harper Collins, Canada, for an ARC of this book. Closing the eyes and asking the darkness to reveal where you are and who you are. There is no answer when the mind has shut down the reality that was born with Unknown trauma. The story tells the journey of a woman who has experienced unexplained memory Loss. She is taken to the RCMP, who in turn took her to the hospital to find out the Severity of her injuries. The situation that she is in, Sandra SG Wong: In The Dark We Forget book review: Thank You to Harper Collins, Canada, for an ARC of this book. Closing the eyes and asking the darkness to reveal where you are and who you are. There is no answer when the mind has shut down the reality that was born with Unknown trauma. The story tells the journey of a woman who has experienced unexplained memory Loss. She is taken to the RCMP, who in turn took her to the hospital to find out the Severity of her injuries. The situation that she is in, causes some behaviour manners that might not be her true Nature. Reading and learning about cultures different from my own is interesting and eye opening. Chinese, and all Asian as well, have been discriminated and looked down, even in this story, By some law officers. I am getting an impression that RCMP was not too eager to help Cleo in her case, except Aoki, who tried to follow the process set by the RCMP procedures. I felt that she was not Happy that she could not do more for Cleo. Cleo, an angry individual. Brought up with parents who wanted the best for her, in a way that Was emotionally damaging. Belittling and complaining was Cleo’s experience of motherly love, Which was not helped by the father. All in all, this is an interesting story, and will make some adjustments in attitudes towards Our fellow citizens. Especially for those who do not necessarily fit the thoughts and manners of White generation. We do have a lot to learn, and this story is a very good example of the differences in our society. I recommend this book highly and have no problem giving 5 stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gurjyot

    Be ready to question everything in this “who done it” type of story. I swear I had questions from the first page up until the last sentence. Still so many questions… I’m not sure how I feel about a book having so many unanswered questions especially when this doesn’t seem like a sequel type of novel. But nonetheless, this was overall a good read. The ways the author weaves in experiences of BIPOC, second generation Canadians, and members of the LGBTQ+ community and raises awareness of the micro Be ready to question everything in this “who done it” type of story. I swear I had questions from the first page up until the last sentence. Still so many questions… I’m not sure how I feel about a book having so many unanswered questions especially when this doesn’t seem like a sequel type of novel. But nonetheless, this was overall a good read. The ways the author weaves in experiences of BIPOC, second generation Canadians, and members of the LGBTQ+ community and raises awareness of the micro aggressions faced by these communities, is amazing. The social commentary in this book makes it worth the read and includes some great representation/diversity. The descriptive writing helps illustrate the scene but seems a little drawn out at times. The entire novel is a continuous timeline instead of a new chapter acting as a scene or time change which might have had a hand in feeling that way. Some may enjoy this style of writing more than I did. With the narrator, Cleo, experiencing amnesia, It’s understandable that there’s a lot of talk about her thoughts. But there are few stretches of description that don’t always seem necessary to the story. I found myself skimming through certain sections of Cleo’s thought processes. I am however glad I still got to part 3 of 3 because that’s when this story really picks up! ⭐️ 3.5/5 Thank you Harper Collins for the ARC

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Thank you Harper Collins Canada, Killer Crime Club and Net Galley for the ARC of In The Dark We Forget. This book covers so many topics - a look into the Canadian Chinese community, domestic and workplace abuse, and LGBQT - all tied up as a psychological thriller. Approached from a different point of view, the protagonist has totally lost her memory. Lost memories, lost parents and the search for who she really is takes Cleo on a not so pleasant journey. Often dark and always questioning In The Thank you Harper Collins Canada, Killer Crime Club and Net Galley for the ARC of In The Dark We Forget. This book covers so many topics - a look into the Canadian Chinese community, domestic and workplace abuse, and LGBQT - all tied up as a psychological thriller. Approached from a different point of view, the protagonist has totally lost her memory. Lost memories, lost parents and the search for who she really is takes Cleo on a not so pleasant journey. Often dark and always questioning In The Dark We Forget takes us down a path most of us would not want to travel. #InTheDarkWeForget#NetGalley#HarperCollinsCanada#KillerCrimeClub

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    ARC Kindle Copy from Review from Net Galley, HarperCollins Canada and Killer Crime Club. I received a free, advance copy of this book and this is my unbiased and voluntary review. A woman wakes up with amnesia in a deserted mountain highway. She is confused and alone as she tries to regain her memory as she soon remembers her parents disappeared after her mother won a huge lottery. Is it coincidental or is it? Slowly she starts to remember bit as she becomes afraid as nightmares start to consume he ARC Kindle Copy from Review from Net Galley, HarperCollins Canada and Killer Crime Club. I received a free, advance copy of this book and this is my unbiased and voluntary review. A woman wakes up with amnesia in a deserted mountain highway. She is confused and alone as she tries to regain her memory as she soon remembers her parents disappeared after her mother won a huge lottery. Is it coincidental or is it? Slowly she starts to remember bit as she becomes afraid as nightmares start to consume her. Soon she wonders if she should be afraid of herself instead. A gripping turns of the page as we watch the intricate of family dynamics and the lies we tell.

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