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Summary Judgment: A Lawyer's Memoir

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Everyone leaves death row. Few leave it alive. During the summer of 1984 twenty-year-old Tommy Hamilton, the product of a deprived childhood in rural Alabama, shoots and kills his boss. Convicted of murder, Tommy is sentenced to death. Before facing the electric chair, one final appeal offers the chance to save Tommy’s life, if only his two Chicago-based lawyers and a nun Everyone leaves death row. Few leave it alive. During the summer of 1984 twenty-year-old Tommy Hamilton, the product of a deprived childhood in rural Alabama, shoots and kills his boss. Convicted of murder, Tommy is sentenced to death. Before facing the electric chair, one final appeal offers the chance to save Tommy’s life, if only his two Chicago-based lawyers and a nun from Alabama can prove he is not legally guilty…even if he is not truly innocent. Tommy fears an incarcerated life more than the electric chair. As limited as his intellect is, he realizes that even a reduced life sentence without the possibility of parole is—like electrocution—a death in prison sentence. If his lawyers are unable to get him out, Tommy professes a willingness to be executed. Despite a material witness allegedly committing suicide and their client escaping from jail during the court proceedings, the lawyers present evidence that perjury tainted both Tommy’s conviction and death sentence. Nevertheless, the judge assigned to determine Tommy’s fate maintains that, “Hamilton may deserve the death penalty and he may yet receive it.” Summary Judgment is the fascinating true crime story told by one of Tommy’s lawyers that reveals how this life-and-death case unfolded in real time.


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Everyone leaves death row. Few leave it alive. During the summer of 1984 twenty-year-old Tommy Hamilton, the product of a deprived childhood in rural Alabama, shoots and kills his boss. Convicted of murder, Tommy is sentenced to death. Before facing the electric chair, one final appeal offers the chance to save Tommy’s life, if only his two Chicago-based lawyers and a nun Everyone leaves death row. Few leave it alive. During the summer of 1984 twenty-year-old Tommy Hamilton, the product of a deprived childhood in rural Alabama, shoots and kills his boss. Convicted of murder, Tommy is sentenced to death. Before facing the electric chair, one final appeal offers the chance to save Tommy’s life, if only his two Chicago-based lawyers and a nun from Alabama can prove he is not legally guilty…even if he is not truly innocent. Tommy fears an incarcerated life more than the electric chair. As limited as his intellect is, he realizes that even a reduced life sentence without the possibility of parole is—like electrocution—a death in prison sentence. If his lawyers are unable to get him out, Tommy professes a willingness to be executed. Despite a material witness allegedly committing suicide and their client escaping from jail during the court proceedings, the lawyers present evidence that perjury tainted both Tommy’s conviction and death sentence. Nevertheless, the judge assigned to determine Tommy’s fate maintains that, “Hamilton may deserve the death penalty and he may yet receive it.” Summary Judgment is the fascinating true crime story told by one of Tommy’s lawyers that reveals how this life-and-death case unfolded in real time.

30 review for Summary Judgment: A Lawyer's Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    EAN

    From its tone, voice, and legal rigor, Summary Judgment is a book that is clearly written by an attorney. But, it is also a great story, told well. In typical true crime fashion, its first pages contain a murder. This murder, which takes place in rural Alabama, would turn out to be a life-changing event for the author, a successful corporate litigator and family man in Chicago, Illinois, who was actively seeking greater fulfillment than just “winning” cases. He was also looking for opportunities From its tone, voice, and legal rigor, Summary Judgment is a book that is clearly written by an attorney. But, it is also a great story, told well. In typical true crime fashion, its first pages contain a murder. This murder, which takes place in rural Alabama, would turn out to be a life-changing event for the author, a successful corporate litigator and family man in Chicago, Illinois, who was actively seeking greater fulfillment than just “winning” cases. He was also looking for opportunities to give back. The author’s quest led to several pro bono defenses, one of which involved a minister who had been arrested for allegedly soliciting an undercover policeman. The author’s recounting of his own career, his personal desire to pursue so-called un-winnable cases, the facts of this case, and his litigation strategy provide an excellent preview of the rest of the book. The rest of the book is about the murder, who did it, context and circumstances, the ensuing death-penalty trial, appeals, litigation strategy, the horribly unjust implementation of the death penalty, and the consequences of incompetent legal representation. The author was selected by the ABA Death Penalty Representation Project to represent Tommy Hamilton who killed Lehman Wood in the Bankhead National Forest near Moulton, Alabama. Realizing the obvious difficulties that he would face as a Chicago corporate lawyer interacting with the Alabama courts, the author enlisted, among others, the assistance of Sister Lynn McKenzie, a Benedictine nun, also known as Ninja Nun. To quote the author: “While those of us in law firms catering to corporations were doing well in life, Lynn and her sisters were truly doing good.” The time span of the author’s most intensive involvement in Tommy Hamilton’s case ran from 1984 to 1996. The book provides much detail that may well be best appreciated by legally trained readers. But still, it is riveting. Extensive discussion is devoted to the death penalty. There is no sugar-coating in the recounting of events. Ultimately, this book is a case study that graphically illustrates an important truth: Justice is not merely about exonerating the innocent or simply winning at trial. A lawful result may not be achieved by unlawful means. The legal process, which is too often flawed, matters. Seeking justice is frequently quite messy. ****

  2. 4 out of 5

    True Crime Index

    A thorough and unmitigated view of one death row case in Alabama from a defense attorney’s perspective, Summary Judgement: A Lawyer’s Memoir by Donald Cameron Clark, Jr. (Girl Friday Productions 2021) is a startling look at just how far the justice system in the United States has to go in reforming prisons, court proceedings, and abolishing the death penalty. Clark’s memoir focuses on the death row case of Tommy Hamilton. Hamilton grew up in rural Alabama in a horribly troubled and abusive home, A thorough and unmitigated view of one death row case in Alabama from a defense attorney’s perspective, Summary Judgement: A Lawyer’s Memoir by Donald Cameron Clark, Jr. (Girl Friday Productions 2021) is a startling look at just how far the justice system in the United States has to go in reforming prisons, court proceedings, and abolishing the death penalty. Clark’s memoir focuses on the death row case of Tommy Hamilton. Hamilton grew up in rural Alabama in a horribly troubled and abusive home, and later became a victim of substance abuse as a young adult. In the summer of 1984, Hamilton shot and killed his boss along the side of a road next to a stretch of woods. After he was convicted of capital murder, Hamilton was sentenced to die in Alabama’s electric chair. This is where Clark enters the story. A Chicago-based lawyer, Clark, alongside a colleague and a Catholic nun/attorney from Alabama arrive to attempt to prove that Hamilton is not legally guilty, despite the fact that he is not factually innocent. However, Hamilton knows that, even if his lawyers are able to have his death sentence repealed, he will instead die in prison serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. As a result, Hamilton insists that he would prefer the electric chair. Presented with this challenge, as well as many others, including a witness’s alleged suicide and their own client’s escape from custody, Hamilton’s lawyers, Clark included, began the arduous task of combing through Hamilton’s original trial and sentencing hearing to prove that he did not receive a fair trial. This book was an excellent account of a true crime case that may never have received any literary treatment if not for the shocking circumstances of the trial and Hamilton’s subsequent death row appeals. However, Clark warns us throughout that the substance of this case is both Hamilton’s particular circumstances and the circumstances of hundreds of death row inmates (incarcerated and already executed) around the country. Though he honestly expresses his own fraught relationship with the death penalty, Clark points out that not only is the punishment inordinately harsh and cruel, but the justice system also works very hard to make sure that once prisoners are sentenced to death, they stay on death row: “Most people know that criminal defendants have the constitutional right to have an attorney appointed for them at trial and during direct appeals if they are unable to afford one. Few people, however, are aware that additional legal remedies—known as collateral remedies—remain available to those convicted of crimes even after they have unsuccessfully exhausted all direct appeals of their convictions. And fewer still know that indigent convicts are orphaned as far as having legal representation provided so that they can meaningfully pursue these collateral remedies.” (17) By impeding their right to counsel, the justice system limits a death row inmate’s contact with the legal system and the outside world. Clark expertly points out that, in the case of Tommy Hamilton, a young person who suffered from intellectual and emotional disabilities, and with little financial recourse of his own, this legal “orphaning” can be catastrophic. Clark’s memoir is a fascinating look into the life of a defense attorney as much as it is a discussion of the death penalty in general. An experienced lawyer, Clark contemplates the dominating perceptions/stereotypes about his profession, his own reasons for working as an attorney, and the duty he feels he has to the general public to represent them, whatever their circumstances may be. “Lawyers defending the condemned have always played a pivotal role in the determination of which criminal defendants are sentence to death. Indeed, the call for a lawyer to defend the most heinous among us, and the accompanying scorn for those lawyers who do so, has been with the profession since the founding of this country. … Defending those that society has condemned is not an easy choice for any attorney, and it can have real consequences for themselves and their families.” (256-7). The cast of “characters” in this text is almost too good to be true: two big city Chicago lawyers, a close-knit, Alabama family, and a Catholic nun who is also a practicing attorney. Their experiences, all told from Clark’s perspective, are thought-provoking and illuminating. Each person approaches the case with a moral obligation to help, rather than to harm. Clark and his team take on the Alabama justice system in order to save one man from dying, but Clark uses Hamilton’s case to point out that death row is a complicated, outdated, and extremely flawed element of the prison system (a horrifically flawed institution as a whole). Clark also acknowledges that although victims deserve justice, factually guilty people also deserve rights, and there is a balance to be found between these two concepts: “To defend against the death penalty is not to be dismissive of crime. It is not to be callous toward victims. Tommy Hamilton was not innocent, but he was unconstitutionally sentenced to death. Our arguments in Tommy’s case had a sound constitutional basis, while accounting for the needs of law enforcement and the protection of the public. … I was not so much defending the man and what he had done as I was defending the law under which he should have been tried in the first place. This may be a difficult duty for a lawyer in the case of the factually guilty client, but it is necessary for our free society nonetheless.” (265) Clark’s memoir is a brilliant true crime text told from a perspective that we do not often hear from: the defense attorney. Thoroughly relayed and well-written, I highly recommend this book. If you would like to read more about the death penalty in the United States and those organizations who work to abolish it, please visit The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. Additionally, “7 Organizations Working To End The Death Penalty,” an article from Bustle, provides a short list of current organizations in the USA working to abolish executions and also addresses some current concerns around death penalty cases in 2021. Please add Summary Judgement to your Goodreads shelf. Don’t forget to follow True Crime Index on Twitter @TrueCrimeIndex and please visit our Goodreads for updates on what we’re reading! You can find Rachel on her personal @RachelMFriars or on Goodreads @Rachel Friars. About the Writer: Rachel M. Friars (she/her) is a PhD student in the Department of English Language and Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She holds a BA and an MA in English Literature with a focus on neo-Victorianism and adaptations of Jane Eyre. Her current work centers on neo-Victorianism and nineteenth-century lesbian literature and history, with secondary research interests in life writing, historical fiction, true crime, popular culture, and the Gothic. Her academic writing has been published with Palgrave Macmillan and in The Journal of Neo-Victorian Studies. She is a reviewer for The Lesbrary, the co-creator of True Crime Index, and an Associate Editor and Social Media Coordinator for PopMeC Research Collective. Rachel is co-editor-in-chief of the international literary journal, The Lamp, and regularly publishes her own short fiction and poetry. Find her on Twitter and Goodreads. A digital copy of this book was graciously provided to True Crime Index from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    "I was not so much defending the man and what he had done as I was defending the law under which he should have been tried in the first place. This may be difficult duty for a lawyer in the case of the factually guilty client, but it is necessary for our free society nonetheless." Clark's book starts off with one very clear fact: his client Tommy Hamilton was guilty of murder. He was on death row in Alabama (a state that today "continues to sentence more people to death per capita [...] than any "I was not so much defending the man and what he had done as I was defending the law under which he should have been tried in the first place. This may be difficult duty for a lawyer in the case of the factually guilty client, but it is necessary for our free society nonetheless." Clark's book starts off with one very clear fact: his client Tommy Hamilton was guilty of murder. He was on death row in Alabama (a state that today "continues to sentence more people to death per capita [...] than any other state") and Clark was chosen to represent him through the Death Penalty Representation Project. Clark's book gives readers a look at his early life as a lawyer before jumping into his retelling of his work on Tommy's post-conviction hearings. His detailed history of the death penalty in America was fascinating and well researched. And his efforts on behalf of his client give me hope for the justice system. Clark's retelling of this case is mixed in with helpful explanations of his actions for readers (like me) who are not well-versed in law, court cases, and legal strategy. I was worried I wouldn't be able to follow along with all the ins and outs of a case like this, but Clark does a great job of detailing his thoughts and actions which helped me really experience the ups and downs he did during the trial. Overall, this was a fascinating story of one counselor-at-law who fights to make sure his client gets the fairest representation, regardless of his actions. As a fan of true crime, I really enjoyed getting a firsthand look at the legal aspect of a case like this. Clark clearly took his role in these proceedings very seriously and his passion and commitment to his client and justice as a whole is incredibly inspiring.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    As a person with a longtime interest in abolishing the death penalty and a legal degree from the school of tv courtroom dramas :), I was intrigued to read this story of two Chicago lawyers and a Southern nun lawyer taking on the archaic and prejudicial legal system of Alabama on behalf of a death row inmate. I am grateful for Donald Clark documenting this story, as it probably would never have made it into a Hollywood script. Movie stories involving the death penalty inevitably focus on defendin As a person with a longtime interest in abolishing the death penalty and a legal degree from the school of tv courtroom dramas :), I was intrigued to read this story of two Chicago lawyers and a Southern nun lawyer taking on the archaic and prejudicial legal system of Alabama on behalf of a death row inmate. I am grateful for Donald Clark documenting this story, as it probably would never have made it into a Hollywood script. Movie stories involving the death penalty inevitably focus on defending what Clark terms the "factually innocent." This story reflects the more common reality, the shades of gray involving seeking justice for someone who committed the crime. This is where we truly begin to understand the importance of the law and dig deeper into what justice really means. Clark takes you into the lives of the characters in this story in a way that helps the reader understand the multitude of life circumstances and decisions that led them to the scene of the crime. It is also clear that if it were not for lawyers of integrity like Clark who are willing to take on these cases, our at times barbaric legal system could simply toss away these human lives. As Clark points out, Alabama continues to sentence people to death at an astounding rate. While Hollywood may continue to focus on the factually innocent wrongly convicted, those who seek a deeper understanding of the law should instead be focusing on stories like this one of Tommy Hamilton and the lawyers of integrity dedicated to seeing that he received legal (and morally) appropriate justice. Yes this book includes learning "legalese" as one reviewer put it, as you wind through the story. But isn't it about time that those of us casting judgment on our fellow citizens who commit crimes begin to actually understand the principles our judicial system is built on, and the myriad of ways it must be protected to actually serve us? Clark takes us through those many laws and previous rulings in the context of this case, and these humans involved in the case and their stories. At the end, the reader is a better, more educated citizen for having taken the journey through this story. Lawyers will love this book as a highly interesting case study, and non-lawyers will love the story as told by Clark and can benefit by learning more about the law along the way. And if Hollywood were to take on this story... we'd all be better off for it. Justice must be for all of us, not just the factually innocent. If it isn't, then we fail as a society.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Girl Friday Productions for providing me with a copy of this eARC in exchange for an honest review. Summary Judgment was a really interesting book, which introduced the reader to the intricacies of death row appeals through one particular case. Tommy is convicted of murder and sentenced to death. He did it, but it’s eye opening to learn of how the appeals process works and why it’s needed. I found the story engaging and informative. Living in a non death penalty coun Many thanks to NetGalley and Girl Friday Productions for providing me with a copy of this eARC in exchange for an honest review. Summary Judgment was a really interesting book, which introduced the reader to the intricacies of death row appeals through one particular case. Tommy is convicted of murder and sentenced to death. He did it, but it’s eye opening to learn of how the appeals process works and why it’s needed. I found the story engaging and informative. Living in a non death penalty country, it was fascinating to read how the process works, how it can go wrong, and what is in place to mitigate that. I also felt for Tommy, who’d had a very short lifetime of making bad and impulsive decisions before he made the ones that led him to kill a man. I also liked the way the chapters were set out, so you knew what was going to be in each one. There was a lot of law jargon, test cases, and arguments which some may find a bit much, but I really loved how Clark really dug down into why he raised the appeals and arguments he did and how it all pulled together. I felt it really gave a deeper understanding of how the system works. This book is perfect for anyone who is interested in what happens after a conviction or who is interested in how death sentence appeals work. It’s definitely one I will recommend to all my true crime friends!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Although Summary Judgment is a nonfiction criminal case story, it reads like an intense, fast-paced, page-turning, first-rate novel. It provides an articulate and poignant view into the legal world of defending the rights of a known criminal on death row. Years of thankless, heart-wrenching, professional work by a dedicated, truly compassionate, detail-oriented, two-person team of attorneys working pro-bono on his behalf are condensed into an easy, invigorating read. There are many deeply emotio Although Summary Judgment is a nonfiction criminal case story, it reads like an intense, fast-paced, page-turning, first-rate novel. It provides an articulate and poignant view into the legal world of defending the rights of a known criminal on death row. Years of thankless, heart-wrenching, professional work by a dedicated, truly compassionate, detail-oriented, two-person team of attorneys working pro-bono on his behalf are condensed into an easy, invigorating read. There are many deeply emotional and touching components to this unique story. The demonstration of such concern for an individual like the lead character is so foreign to most of us in our everyday lives. This book highlights attention to those in society less fortunate than ourselves. Thank goodness for real life heroes such as the author Donald Clark and Sister Lynn McKenzie. I encourage you to read this 5-star book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Summary Judgement is the true story of Tommy Hamilton, convicted of murder and sentenced to death in rural Alabama, written by his appeals attorney. Meticulously researched, the book does get bogged down at times as the author delves into the history of the death penalty, and at other points when he cites specific court rulings to support his appeal briefs. While there is no doubt of Tommy’s guilt, there are valid questions as to how fair the sentencing process was, and that constitutes the bulk Summary Judgement is the true story of Tommy Hamilton, convicted of murder and sentenced to death in rural Alabama, written by his appeals attorney. Meticulously researched, the book does get bogged down at times as the author delves into the history of the death penalty, and at other points when he cites specific court rulings to support his appeal briefs. While there is no doubt of Tommy’s guilt, there are valid questions as to how fair the sentencing process was, and that constitutes the bulk of this story. While I don’t necessarily agree with the author’s POV on the death penalty or his client’s culpability, it’s an interesting insider look at the process, one we rarely see, and that makes this a worthwhile read. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Summary Judgement is complete, concise, insightful and educational. Interesting the lengths some will go to in order to challenge that a person is innocent until proven guilty, and how being in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong attorney can lead to the death penalty. This book shares the story of someone who was coerced into committing a murder--and yet even though a life was taken, it's possible to empathize with the murderer when justice was not served--aka--does the punishment Summary Judgement is complete, concise, insightful and educational. Interesting the lengths some will go to in order to challenge that a person is innocent until proven guilty, and how being in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong attorney can lead to the death penalty. This book shares the story of someone who was coerced into committing a murder--and yet even though a life was taken, it's possible to empathize with the murderer when justice was not served--aka--does the punishment fit the crime? Attorneys Clark, DeGrand and Sister Lynn are able to see past the guilty verdict and recognize justice has not been done and work together to change a life. Good, solid read--once you've read the entire book go back and read chapter 10 again--you'll appreciate it even more!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicki Kendall

    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review. An in depth, thought provoking memoir by a defense attorney. It delves into one of his cases where he was trying to fight to keep the defendant from remaining on death row. For all those people who don't understand how defense attorney's can defend the guilty, this memoir goes into explain what motivates defense attorney's to take a side that many people find abbohrent and hard to comprehend. ⭐⭐⭐#donaldcameronclark #summar Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review. An in depth, thought provoking memoir by a defense attorney. It delves into one of his cases where he was trying to fight to keep the defendant from remaining on death row. For all those people who don't understand how defense attorney's can defend the guilty, this memoir goes into explain what motivates defense attorney's to take a side that many people find abbohrent and hard to comprehend. ⭐⭐⭐#donaldcameronclark #summaryjudgment #netgalley #tea_sipping_bookworm #litsy #goodreads #thestorygraph #truecrime #memoir #bookqueen #bookstagram #amazonkindle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sinder

    Don Clark has written a compelling first-hand account of his efforts to convince the Alabama courts to overturn the conviction and death sentence of Tommy Hamilton. He meticulously and methodically recounts the facts, legal issues and the critical events of the case. And, he raises important ethical and moral questions about capital punishment. In addition, Don makes it a very personal story by including details about Tommy's life and family. I recommend this fascinating page turner for lawyers Don Clark has written a compelling first-hand account of his efforts to convince the Alabama courts to overturn the conviction and death sentence of Tommy Hamilton. He meticulously and methodically recounts the facts, legal issues and the critical events of the case. And, he raises important ethical and moral questions about capital punishment. In addition, Don makes it a very personal story by including details about Tommy's life and family. I recommend this fascinating page turner for lawyers and non-lawyers alike.

  11. 4 out of 5

    James

    This is the nuts and bolts of a death penalty challenge. That probably what it had to be since the client wasn't sympathetic. You can't always pick your client. It might also explain why this book didn't come to my attention for some time. There might be a more compelling story of the attorney nun, that's what actually brought me to the book. But, if you are interested in innocent projects or challenging the death penalty, this is a good book to read. I rounded up to 4 stars. It didn't reach that This is the nuts and bolts of a death penalty challenge. That probably what it had to be since the client wasn't sympathetic. You can't always pick your client. It might also explain why this book didn't come to my attention for some time. There might be a more compelling story of the attorney nun, that's what actually brought me to the book. But, if you are interested in innocent projects or challenging the death penalty, this is a good book to read. I rounded up to 4 stars. It didn't reach that.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Debra McMaster

    Fascinating Written in understandable terms, this is the author’s account of last ditch efforts to see that his death row client received the full benefits of the law. Prior cases are cited, extensive background and documentation given to guide the reader through the whys and wherefores of his defense. The definitions and ramifications of factual guilt and legal guilt were especially interesting. An excellent read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Larry A.

    This book has it all. Its an unbelievably compelling true story, that is told in a wonderful way. This isn't a genre that I normally gravitate toward, but I picked this up on a recommendation. Wow, am I glad I did. I was hooked! The twists and turns that this case took were amazing. I especially enjoyed how the author used the actual court transcripts to share this real-life drama. It captivated my curiosity, challenged my thinking, and stirred my emotions. This book has it all. Its an unbelievably compelling true story, that is told in a wonderful way. This isn't a genre that I normally gravitate toward, but I picked this up on a recommendation. Wow, am I glad I did. I was hooked! The twists and turns that this case took were amazing. I especially enjoyed how the author used the actual court transcripts to share this real-life drama. It captivated my curiosity, challenged my thinking, and stirred my emotions.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Burns

    Good read, but in my opinion, some of not legal past items could have been cut I liked the part, where they first started trying to defend Tommy. As stated above, too much legal past, that I felt could have been skipped. Really liked the end, where he let us know what happened to me main players.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Donald Clark, Jr. is a lawyer who takes on the case of Tommy Hamilton, who is on death row for murdering a man. He joins a team of appeal lawyers that include a Benedictine nun named Lynn. I found this book bogged down in all the legalese and historical background. If handled differently, it might have been a compelling read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Maylath

    This book was a page turner! I expected to learn about criminal law and death penalty cases, and that was certainly true. I didn’t expect it to read like a best selling crime novel. I couldn’t put it down. Loved it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Donald Cameron Clark Jr. writes a story within a story. We get to learn so much history as this unbelievable tale unfolds. We learn a lot about Don and his growth as a lawyer and a human being. A wonderful book with so many layers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    Well written and informative! Well written and informative! Reads like a novel with historical facts and stories sprinkled in for added entertainment. Great read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Hund

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charlene R. Antonelli

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Villines

  22. 5 out of 5

    JOHN

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette Dunham

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vikki Bullock

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Cuccaro

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chasity and the Never ending Want to read list

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan S. Godwin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Barbara Helleman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie Rasabi

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