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The Simulated Multiverse: An MIT Computer Scientist Explores Parallel Universes, the Simulation Hypothesis, Quantum Computing and the Mandela Effect

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Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that is rendered around us, then many of the complexities and baffling characteristics of our reality start to make more sense. In particular the two most popular interpretations of quantum mechanics, the Copenhagen Interpretation and the Many Worlds interpretation, which are thought to be mutually exclusive, can be unified in an information based framework. Quantum computing lets us simulate complex phenomena in parallel, allowing the simulation to explore many realities at once to find the most "optimum" path forward. Could this explain not only the enigmatic Mandela Effect but provide us with a new understanding of time and space? Bringing his unique trademark style of combining video games, computer science, quantum physics and computing with lots of philosophy and science fiction, Virk gives us a new way to think about not just our universe, but all possible timelines in the multiverse!


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Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that is rendered around us, then many of the complexities and baffling characteristics of our reality start to make more sense. In particular the two most popular interpretations of quantum mechanics, the Copenhagen Interpretation and the Many Worlds interpretation, which are thought to be mutually exclusive, can be unified in an information based framework. Quantum computing lets us simulate complex phenomena in parallel, allowing the simulation to explore many realities at once to find the most "optimum" path forward. Could this explain not only the enigmatic Mandela Effect but provide us with a new understanding of time and space? Bringing his unique trademark style of combining video games, computer science, quantum physics and computing with lots of philosophy and science fiction, Virk gives us a new way to think about not just our universe, but all possible timelines in the multiverse!

41 review for The Simulated Multiverse: An MIT Computer Scientist Explores Parallel Universes, the Simulation Hypothesis, Quantum Computing and the Mandela Effect

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brock Mclaughlin

    Interested in learning more about the Multiverse? Rizwan Virk has created a very accessibly and captivating book all about it. It's geeky, full of sci-fi references and interesting theories and is worth your time if you've ever wondered, are there other versions of you out there in the universe. Interested in learning more about the Multiverse? Rizwan Virk has created a very accessibly and captivating book all about it. It's geeky, full of sci-fi references and interesting theories and is worth your time if you've ever wondered, are there other versions of you out there in the universe.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Are we living within a huge computer simulation? Does it work like a video game that can be replayed, over and over again, to attain a better conclusion? Is that replay effect giving many of us deja vu? In The Simulated Multiverse, a MIT computer scientist tries to untangle the truth from the fiction. Okay, first of all, this is not just pop science. It helps to be well-educated or just plain smart to follow along on the wild ride down the possibility slide contained within this book. Does the au Are we living within a huge computer simulation? Does it work like a video game that can be replayed, over and over again, to attain a better conclusion? Is that replay effect giving many of us deja vu? In The Simulated Multiverse, a MIT computer scientist tries to untangle the truth from the fiction. Okay, first of all, this is not just pop science. It helps to be well-educated or just plain smart to follow along on the wild ride down the possibility slide contained within this book. Does the author scientifically prove anything? No. But he does present some very intriguing possibilities that aren’t disproven by known facts. I find science, especially new theories, fascinating. The Simulated Multiverse is an eye-opener on multiple levels. If you liked A Glitch in the Matrix, or The Matrix itself, this book goes even deeper into those same rabbit holes. This book would also be great for science fiction writers who want to add some unusual plot points or settings to their novels. For me, The Simulated Multiverse is easily worth 5 stars and is a favorite! Thanks to Bayview Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindee Ketches

    Rizwan Virk tackles some complex, multifaceted ideas and explains them very well; (no simple task). This book is by no means an easy read; but it is a rewarding one. I feel that my mind has been opened up to things that I had only skimmed before. The writing has very good flow. A good 4.5/5 stars for the technical readers among us. My one complaint: there were more references to the author’s previous book (the Simulation Hypothesis) than were necessary. It came across as giving it too much of a Rizwan Virk tackles some complex, multifaceted ideas and explains them very well; (no simple task). This book is by no means an easy read; but it is a rewarding one. I feel that my mind has been opened up to things that I had only skimmed before. The writing has very good flow. A good 4.5/5 stars for the technical readers among us. My one complaint: there were more references to the author’s previous book (the Simulation Hypothesis) than were necessary. It came across as giving it too much of a plug. The book explores scientific areas such as physics, computer science, quantum physics, and quantum computing; with science fiction as inspiration to investigate the idea of the simulated multiverse. There is the “idea that we live in a virtual garden of forking paths”; (a quote from Jorge Luis Borges). Starting with the works of Philip K Dick, there are many movie, story, and TV series references used to help explain different people’s thoughts and approaches on the subject; and just how much these ideas have permeated present day culture. Explanations are very well done. A favourite quote of mine explaining quantum computing: “a qubit is a classical bit that has, for lack of a better analogy, gotten drunk and can’t decide whether its value should be 0 or 1”. Scientific reading rarely makes one laugh out loud, but the author managed this in a few places while still taking the topic very seriously.

  4. 4 out of 5

    M. K. French

    Rizvwan Virk is a successful entrepreneur, investor, bestselling author, video game industry pioneer, and indie film producer. Virk currently runs Play Labs @ MIT, leading to a unique experience able to explore the idea of parallel worlds and multiple simulated realities. With the media dealing with multiverses, it's definitely a hot topic right now. Riz had previously spoken on the topic and wrote the book "The Simulation Hypothesis," outlining the hypothesis that our reality is a simulation, r Rizvwan Virk is a successful entrepreneur, investor, bestselling author, video game industry pioneer, and indie film producer. Virk currently runs Play Labs @ MIT, leading to a unique experience able to explore the idea of parallel worlds and multiple simulated realities. With the media dealing with multiverses, it's definitely a hot topic right now. Riz had previously spoken on the topic and wrote the book "The Simulation Hypothesis," outlining the hypothesis that our reality is a simulation, rather like the Matrix. This book goes further than that, outlining at first how he came to research this book, then the theory of the Mandela effect and what the simulation hypothesis is. From there, Virk moves on to the concept of multiverses, quantum worlds as a way to create multiverses, how to build digital worlds, and the algorithms necessary to run the simulations for each digital world. This background draws from philosophy, the famous Platonic shadows in the cave, as well as how philosophers thought about consciousness, to more modern attempts at explaining digital worlds and the possibility that our world is a simulation. It's a theme brought up by multiple people over time and isn't quite the crackpot theory that it first sounds like. At first, I highlighted my copy of the book, and it felt like when I used to read books on string theory for fun. (Yes, I'm a nerd and used to read more scientifically than just sci-fi and fantasy.) This does involve mention of string theory in the section of quantum mechanics, as string theory posits multiple dimensions beyond the four we're used to. (length, width, height, and space-time) These other dimensions exist mathematically and involve geometry and physics beyond easy understanding. This kind of reality is currently involved in cutting-edge computing, and our technology is making great strides in virtual and augmented reality. Many movies for various reasons use virtual backgrounds and sometimes even characters in shots, which can be nearly indistinguishable from reality for the average viewer. What if our reality is the same way? What if we're all in a really complex simulation? Trying to define reality and consciousness is a difficult question and one that occupied many great minds for centuries. New discoveries in math and science force new interpretations to concepts once held to be inviolate, and Virk is doing the same with our sense of reality. This is a fascinating book to read, and it's laid out in easy-to-understand language, even if you didn't read string theory for fun! The concepts build on each other, laying out the framework of the theory and what evidence there is behind it. Even if you don't believe that we're living in a computer simulation, this is a start to understanding the theory and the concepts that are being played around with in the media today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Gilmour

    Excellent book to stretch the imagination about physics multi-person/multi-verse theory. It helped me to solidify some of my own theories about how God intends to save all created beings (both humans and angels) in simulated universes and versions of ourselves, both while flesh and blood, and even in the afterlife!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stanley

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jhludwig

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chitauri

  9. 4 out of 5

    Venkata Kesav

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brad Feld

  11. 5 out of 5

    burhan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Web

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jean

  14. 5 out of 5

    RK Cobb

  15. 4 out of 5

    Goosce

  16. 5 out of 5

    Owen Coleman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ammar

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bibliophilist Indian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michella Andersen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mar

  21. 4 out of 5

    Remo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaz Garewal

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Garcia

  24. 4 out of 5

    *Tau*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  26. 5 out of 5

    Yuriy V

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ash Solomon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ani Moller

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eldritch Reading Reindeer 2021 In Cobwebs

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  31. 4 out of 5

    Lo

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Garcia

  33. 4 out of 5

    Derek Callahan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cathie Ward

  35. 4 out of 5

    Astrid Galactic

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  37. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  38. 4 out of 5

    Steven Myers

  39. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  40. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Jackson

  41. 5 out of 5

    John

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