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The Rocking-Horse Winner

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The Rocking-Horse Winner" is a short story by D. H. Lawrence. The story describes a young middle-class Englishwoman who "had no luck." Though outwardly successful, she is haunted by a sense of failure; her husband is a ne'er-do-well and her work as a commercial artist doesn't earn as much as she'd like. The family's lifestyle exceeds its income and unspoken anxiety about m The Rocking-Horse Winner" is a short story by D. H. Lawrence. The story describes a young middle-class Englishwoman who "had no luck." Though outwardly successful, she is haunted by a sense of failure; her husband is a ne'er-do-well and her work as a commercial artist doesn't earn as much as she'd like. The family's lifestyle exceeds its income and unspoken anxiety about money permeates the household. Her children, a son Paul and his two sisters, sense this anxiety; moreover, the kids even claim they can hear the house whispering "There must be more money." Paul tells his Uncle Oscar Cresswell about betting on horse races with Bassett, the gardener. He's been placing bets using his pocket money and has won and saved three hundred twenty pounds. Sometimes he says he is "sure" of a winner for an upcoming race, and the horses he names do in fact win, sometimes at remarkable odds. Uncle Oscar and Bassett both place large bets on the horses Paul names. After further winning, Paul and Oscar arrange to give the mother a gift of five thousand pounds, but the gift only lets her spend more. Disappointed, Paul tries harder than ever to be "lucky." As the Derby approaches, Paul is determined to learn the winner. Concerned about his health, his mother rushes home from a party and discovers his secret. He has been spending hours riding his rocking horse, sometimes all night long, until he "gets there," into a clairvoyant state where he can be sure of the winner's name. Paul remains ill through the day of the Derby. Informed by Cresswell, Bassett has placed Paul's bet on Malabar, at fourteen to one. When he is informed by Bassett that he now has 80,000 pounds, Paul says to his mother: "I never told you, mother, that if I can ride my horse, and get there, then I'm absolutely sure - oh absolutely! Mother, did I ever tell you? I am lucky!" "No, you never did," said his mother. The boy dies in the night and his mother hears her brother say, "My God, Hester, you're eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil of a son to the bad. But, poor devil, poor devil, he's best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking horse to find a winner.


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The Rocking-Horse Winner" is a short story by D. H. Lawrence. The story describes a young middle-class Englishwoman who "had no luck." Though outwardly successful, she is haunted by a sense of failure; her husband is a ne'er-do-well and her work as a commercial artist doesn't earn as much as she'd like. The family's lifestyle exceeds its income and unspoken anxiety about m The Rocking-Horse Winner" is a short story by D. H. Lawrence. The story describes a young middle-class Englishwoman who "had no luck." Though outwardly successful, she is haunted by a sense of failure; her husband is a ne'er-do-well and her work as a commercial artist doesn't earn as much as she'd like. The family's lifestyle exceeds its income and unspoken anxiety about money permeates the household. Her children, a son Paul and his two sisters, sense this anxiety; moreover, the kids even claim they can hear the house whispering "There must be more money." Paul tells his Uncle Oscar Cresswell about betting on horse races with Bassett, the gardener. He's been placing bets using his pocket money and has won and saved three hundred twenty pounds. Sometimes he says he is "sure" of a winner for an upcoming race, and the horses he names do in fact win, sometimes at remarkable odds. Uncle Oscar and Bassett both place large bets on the horses Paul names. After further winning, Paul and Oscar arrange to give the mother a gift of five thousand pounds, but the gift only lets her spend more. Disappointed, Paul tries harder than ever to be "lucky." As the Derby approaches, Paul is determined to learn the winner. Concerned about his health, his mother rushes home from a party and discovers his secret. He has been spending hours riding his rocking horse, sometimes all night long, until he "gets there," into a clairvoyant state where he can be sure of the winner's name. Paul remains ill through the day of the Derby. Informed by Cresswell, Bassett has placed Paul's bet on Malabar, at fourteen to one. When he is informed by Bassett that he now has 80,000 pounds, Paul says to his mother: "I never told you, mother, that if I can ride my horse, and get there, then I'm absolutely sure - oh absolutely! Mother, did I ever tell you? I am lucky!" "No, you never did," said his mother. The boy dies in the night and his mother hears her brother say, "My God, Hester, you're eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil of a son to the bad. But, poor devil, poor devil, he's best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking horse to find a winner.

30 review for The Rocking-Horse Winner

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cecily

    The opening words sound like a fairy story “There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck.” But it is immediately clear that this is more Grimm than Disney: “She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them.” It was intended to be a ghost story, but there are no ghosts - just supernatural voices and premonitions, and the metaphorical ghost of an off-sta The opening words sound like a fairy story “There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck.” But it is immediately clear that this is more Grimm than Disney: “She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them.” It was intended to be a ghost story, but there are no ghosts - just supernatural voices and premonitions, and the metaphorical ghost of an off-stage, useless father: “Though he had good prospects, those prospects never materialised.” It is as haunting as any ghost story because of the combined effects of lack of love and whispering walls on the boy, Paul: “The house became haunted by the unspoken phrase: There must be more money!’” The heart of the story is luck, money, and the absence of both. The heart of Paul longs for love from the empty heart of his mother. Luck Paul asks why they don’t have a car. His mother says it’s because they’re poor (this is relative - they have a large house and several servants, but live beyond their means). When he asks why, she says, “slowly and bitterly, ‘it’s because your father has no luck.’” She fails to mention her own compulsive spending. “Is luck money, mother?” “No, Paul! Not quite. It’s what causes you to have money… That’s why it’s better to be born lucky than rich.” So does dying rich mean dying lucky (or just that you have a bad accountant?!)? Tragedy or triumph? Make Your Own? The idea of making your own luck is a cliché. But if you “make” it, surely it’s skill, effort, and persistence, rather than luck? Rationalists like me can’t manufacture luck and can’t hope for Paul’s paranormal solution. That leaves us with a delicate balancing act: to accept and enjoy what we have right now, even as we reach out and up, striving for more and better lives, more and better selves. Ad Astra As a child, I named my own rocking horse Pegasus because I knew he had wings. Their invisibility was part - confirmation, even - of their magic. Like Paul, my riding was sometimes frantic, mesmeric, dangerous. Pegasus flew me to many and wondrous places. I won no money, but I lived to tell the tales and to see my own, loved, child ride Pegasus as I had done. I saw my own Winner’s Enclosure. Read as part of Selected Short Stories. Image source for word “Lucky” with horseshoe U: https://previews.123rf.com/images/vip...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tamoghna Biswas

    **4.5 stars** “Although they lived in style, they felt always an anxiety in the house. There was never enough money. The mother had a small income, and the father had a small income, but not nearly enough for the social position which they had to keep up. ” Lawrence is mainly noted for his longer works like Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Sons and Lovers, which were once proclaimed ‘obscene’ but actually were quite ahead of their time, even for now. Considering the genre he usually wrote in, thi **4.5 stars** “Although they lived in style, they felt always an anxiety in the house. There was never enough money. The mother had a small income, and the father had a small income, but not nearly enough for the social position which they had to keep up. ” Lawrence is mainly noted for his longer works like Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Sons and Lovers, which were once proclaimed ‘obscene’ but actually were quite ahead of their time, even for now. Considering the genre he usually wrote in, this tale is of completely different themes, a masterful blend of fantasy and melancholy which is narrated in a fable-ish way. Quite a deviation from the usual, and for good. The story can be summed up as: a kid born of an unloving mother, in a down and out family starts betting on horse races, desperate to win his mother’s love and attention, and also wealth. However, he does all of these in an incomprehensible, mystical way that doesn’t, obviously end well. The loneliness, which a kid can suffer with no fault at all from his part, and how, actually money can control one’s emotions, are among the non-farcical themes of the story. The rest is ambiguous, and even though it’s never to be told a tale of magic-realism, it can well surpass many popular tales from that genre in terms of readability. The story shows one thing to us, towering above all, and that is it’s never enough even for a kid. Greed really is something that can reveal itself from the youngest age. Though different in almost all aspects that can be spoken of, even this tale has that common theme from Lawrence’s usual: dehumanisation and deterioration of human values as a result of industrialisation and modernity. I don’t think it can be categorised as horror, though. Definitely, it can be told haunting, even more so for me as I read it on a depressing day (last day of school). However, you can overthink the obvious, if you don’t care about a good night’s sleep. Can you guess how it ends? Yeah. I bet you can. But you will most probably end up loving this story. As for me, if it weren’t for this story, I won’t have read any more of his works, probably. You can read the story here. “"I don't know. Nobody ever knows why one person is lucky and another unlucky." "Don't they? Nobody at all? Does nobody know?" "Perhaps God. But He never tells." "He ought to, then. And are'nt you lucky either, mother?" "I can't be, it I married an unlucky husband." "But by yourself, aren't you?" "I used to think I was, before I married. Now I think I am very unlucky indeed."”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Helga

    This is a tragic story about how humans are never satisfied with what they have and enough is never enough for them. The story is so strong and real, it makes you take a good look at the things you value in your life and ask yourself are they worth the sacrifices you make to gain them. You can read the short story here: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/... This is a tragic story about how humans are never satisfied with what they have and enough is never enough for them. The story is so strong and real, it makes you take a good look at the things you value in your life and ask yourself are they worth the sacrifices you make to gain them. You can read the short story here: http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    A haunting story that sent a shudder through me at the end. This would have made a perfect episode of the old TV series "The Twilight Zone". Nevertheless, it was a first class fun read. A haunting story that sent a shudder through me at the end. This would have made a perfect episode of the old TV series "The Twilight Zone". Nevertheless, it was a first class fun read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    D.H. Lawrence's 1926 classic short story, The Rocking Horse Winner pulls at your heartstrings from the get-go and refuses to let go until its tragic culmination. As seen below, the opening paragraph does more than make for an emotional first impression, Lawrence's impressive and somehow beautiful prose sucks you in immediately, making it impossible to put down. "There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck. She married for love, and the love D.H. Lawrence's 1926 classic short story, The Rocking Horse Winner pulls at your heartstrings from the get-go and refuses to let go until its tragic culmination. As seen below, the opening paragraph does more than make for an emotional first impression, Lawrence's impressive and somehow beautiful prose sucks you in immediately, making it impossible to put down. "There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck. She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them. They looked at her coldly, as if they were finding fault with her. And hurriedly she felt she must cover up some fault in herself. Yet what it was that she must cover up she never knew. Nevertheless, when her children were present, she always felt the centre of her heart go hard. This troubled her, and in her manner she was all the more gentle and anxious for her children, as if she loved them very much. Only she herself knew that at the centre of her heart was a hard little place that could not feel love, no, not for anybody. Everybody else said of her: "She is such a good mother. She adores her children." Only she herself, and her children themselves, knew it was not so. They read it in each other's eyes." From there, it only gets better. The dialogue is spot-on, relevant, and lifelike. The pictures that Lawrence delivers to the reader is incredibly vivid, increasingly compelling (I couldn't finish it fast enough, really,) and though there are little details like the protagonist's "uncanny blue eyes" that are emphasized for whatever reason, every word serves a purpose. It never felt verbose or unnecessary. On the contrary, literally every word is essential. I have no more to say, other than read it for yourself if you haven't. Even if you have (this was a re-read for me,) give it another go, it's totally worth it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    SheAintGotNoShoes

    I must have been around 15 when I read this story and I remember it blowing my mind. I have not read it since, and while knowing practically nothing about psychology then, even though as an adult I went into social work, it is a great story with some psy elements and a certain 'creepiness ' about it. Time to re-discover it after over 40 years. A++++++++ I must have been around 15 when I read this story and I remember it blowing my mind. I have not read it since, and while knowing practically nothing about psychology then, even though as an adult I went into social work, it is a great story with some psy elements and a certain 'creepiness ' about it. Time to re-discover it after over 40 years. A++++++++

  7. 4 out of 5

    Petra X thanks everyone for their good wishes xxx

    I 'read' this on audio. I'm getting used to the medium and can see that the acting ability of the narrator is what makes all the difference. More difference that the actual text written by the author. This narrator, a woman, chose to give the little boy a thin, reedy voice, almost laughable, but written, I could see that this had considerably greater depth. No matter what I read and hear, I have to say that still to me listening to an audio book is entirely synonymous to listening to a radio play I 'read' this on audio. I'm getting used to the medium and can see that the acting ability of the narrator is what makes all the difference. More difference that the actual text written by the author. This narrator, a woman, chose to give the little boy a thin, reedy voice, almost laughable, but written, I could see that this had considerably greater depth. No matter what I read and hear, I have to say that still to me listening to an audio book is entirely synonymous to listening to a radio play and in no way has the depth of a written book - after all th e characterisation and emphasis have all been taken out of my hands and, like with a film, its someone else's interpretation that is feeding my brain.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Ted

    I read this during my BA at University, and then again during the MA, when it was called upon again. As ever, I remember exactly where I was: I was bombing towards C. on a train from W. and as this haunting, almost terrifying, little story unfolded, the rocking and jolting train beneath me became all the more part of the narrative... A brilliant short story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kels

    Let me just start off by saying that I'm fiercely unafraid of criticizing and rejecting a classic. I'm not all that impressed by antiquity, nor do I feel the need to rate something highly just because it is a lauded piece of literature. So now that we have gotten that out the way, I must say that The Rocking Horse Winner is a lackluster tale, more akin to a fable, that blatantly and obtrusively tries to weave in morality within its plot with all the elegance of a T-Rex trying to make up a bed. ( Let me just start off by saying that I'm fiercely unafraid of criticizing and rejecting a classic. I'm not all that impressed by antiquity, nor do I feel the need to rate something highly just because it is a lauded piece of literature. So now that we have gotten that out the way, I must say that The Rocking Horse Winner is a lackluster tale, more akin to a fable, that blatantly and obtrusively tries to weave in morality within its plot with all the elegance of a T-Rex trying to make up a bed. (just picture it!) The narrative suffers greatly from being depthless and of course, I do realize that this is a short story. Yet even shorts can do a good job of adding layers and profundity to a story, but this short decidedly doesn't put the slightest effort into accomplishing that feat. The writing was colorless, the characters went unexplained, and the plot and moral of the story was so obvious, really, it need not be written.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    "And so the house came to be haunted by the unspoken phrase: There must be more money! There must be more money! The children could hear it all the time though nobody said it aloud. They heard it at Christmas, when the expensive and splendid toys filled the nursery. (...) And the children would stop playing, to listen for a moment. They would look into each other’s eyes, to see if they had all heard. And each one saw in the eyes of the other two that they too had heard. “There must be more money "And so the house came to be haunted by the unspoken phrase: There must be more money! There must be more money! The children could hear it all the time though nobody said it aloud. They heard it at Christmas, when the expensive and splendid toys filled the nursery. (...) And the children would stop playing, to listen for a moment. They would look into each other’s eyes, to see if they had all heard. And each one saw in the eyes of the other two that they too had heard. “There must be more money! There must be more money!” Escrito em 1926 e ainda a fazer sentido quase 100 depois, esta história sobre a ânsia ter de mais dinheiro e mais bens materiais, em que essa pressão passa para as crianças da família, sobretudo para um rapazinho que tem um cavalo de balouço muito especial.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shayantani

    A short story rendered to perfection. It’s about how a parent’s greed and dissatisfaction can affect their children and rob them of their innocence. Lots of symbolism in the story and I really liked it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    This remains my favorite short story of all time. In that I will follow my dictum of when I was 15 and suggest that writing about it would damage the beauty of it. My English teachers were not impressed by my appeal to aesthetics. This story is about how greed overwhelms and isolates and alienates us from what is truly valuable in life, a constant theme within Lawrence. The topic is treated masterfully and the end is tragic. To me this wonderful story will always be hauntingly beautiful with a mo This remains my favorite short story of all time. In that I will follow my dictum of when I was 15 and suggest that writing about it would damage the beauty of it. My English teachers were not impressed by my appeal to aesthetics. This story is about how greed overwhelms and isolates and alienates us from what is truly valuable in life, a constant theme within Lawrence. The topic is treated masterfully and the end is tragic. To me this wonderful story will always be hauntingly beautiful with a moral to which the modern world has not paid sufficient attention.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kay Pelham

    It was a good read. Four stars because I'm uncertain about how to feel about the ending. Now I wait for Tuesday's The Literary Life podcast episode on it. It was a good read. Four stars because I'm uncertain about how to feel about the ending. Now I wait for Tuesday's The Literary Life podcast episode on it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    more of a 3.5 or 3.75 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    You know I don't regularly recommend music with my book reviews but Led Zeppelin's Stairway To Heaven seems almost scarily appropriate here and I will offer it in place of my usual opening quote. This story highlights the sometimes sad circumstance that can happen when a child feels (or is forced to feel/be) obligated for the well-being of his/her family. In this case the child without the knowledge of his mom feels called to this to relieve the hard circumstance of his family and it ends in the You know I don't regularly recommend music with my book reviews but Led Zeppelin's Stairway To Heaven seems almost scarily appropriate here and I will offer it in place of my usual opening quote. This story highlights the sometimes sad circumstance that can happen when a child feels (or is forced to feel/be) obligated for the well-being of his/her family. In this case the child without the knowledge of his mom feels called to this to relieve the hard circumstance of his family and it ends in the way that you think a young child taking financial matters in his own hand behind his parent's back would but the plot...is not what you thought it was going to be. This book has a lot of interpretations from economic to social to feminist. It makes you really have to think who or what is bad here, there is an antagonist but where do I look for the antagonist at? I for one would think a combination of greed, bad communication, and indifference combine to be the real antagonist in this story, but I will let you read and tell me if I'm right. HEY! I THOUGHT OF ANOTHER SONG! XD Very dark humor.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I studied D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner in my creative writing class some time ago and it has always been a piece of his work that I greatly admire. The story appears to be very average on a surface level, but upon analyzing the many different possible interpretations that can be drawn from it, one begins to respect the amount of thought that was put into its conception. Needless to say to those who have read The Rocking Horse Winner, Freud would have a field day with this. Symbolism I studied D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner in my creative writing class some time ago and it has always been a piece of his work that I greatly admire. The story appears to be very average on a surface level, but upon analyzing the many different possible interpretations that can be drawn from it, one begins to respect the amount of thought that was put into its conception. Needless to say to those who have read The Rocking Horse Winner, Freud would have a field day with this. Symbolism is so prominant here, and it is when you slowly begin to decipher the true meanings behind the commonplace objects that Lawrence mentions that you will fully understand the story. I would wager that it was since reading this story that I have been so suspicious of that which I read, always searching for hidden connotations and expecting the unexpected at each turn. I no longer read a story and accept all of the details for face value. What a marvelous thing Lawrence has instilled in me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    You may read online here. Opening lines: There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck. She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them. You may read online here. Opening lines: There was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck. She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laurajean

    This story continues to haunt me. Sometimes when I'm paying bills, I can hear myself chanting "There must be more money. There must be more money." This story continues to haunt me. Sometimes when I'm paying bills, I can hear myself chanting "There must be more money. There must be more money."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Perla

    "A short story about a boy and his quest to be "lucky". The boy knows that his family is struggling with money and he asks his mother how other people have more than they do. She says that some people are simply more "lucky" than others, and that their father was in fact, very unlucky. The boy begins searching for luck, and finds it while he's riding his rocking horse. Through some unknown force, the boy is able to predict the winner of the next horse race, after riding his rocking horse. The st "A short story about a boy and his quest to be "lucky". The boy knows that his family is struggling with money and he asks his mother how other people have more than they do. She says that some people are simply more "lucky" than others, and that their father was in fact, very unlucky. The boy begins searching for luck, and finds it while he's riding his rocking horse. Through some unknown force, the boy is able to predict the winner of the next horse race, after riding his rocking horse. The story ends with the boy struggling to keep up with the amount of money that he thinks his mother wants, because she continually desires more and more money. The boy dies one night after riding the rocking horse for a very long time. I suppose that the moral of the story is about the mother's greed. While the boy continually wins races, it isn't enough for his parents, who want more and more expensive items. The boy dies before ever getting what he wanted, which was to be loved by his mother, while she was caught up in a world where she could never have enough. "

  20. 4 out of 5

    Len Evans Jr

    Read this back when I was in college for an English Lit Class and totally loved it. "Master Painting Room" has stuck in my head ever since... Not that I need a special room for my Master Painting LOL Read this back when I was in college for an English Lit Class and totally loved it. "Master Painting Room" has stuck in my head ever since... Not that I need a special room for my Master Painting LOL

  21. 5 out of 5

    Capsguy

    Prime example of how a short story can be done to perfection. Not a single word wasted.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hamza Farouz

    "There must be more money! There must be more money!" ////Money is not the answer to all our problems//// Paul childishly believes that money is the answer to all his problems, when in fact, his problems stem from greed, a lack of intimacy with his mother, Sadly, the money Paul has worked so hard to win doesn’t improve his mother’s spirits—instead, she just wants more. Lawrence demonstrates here that greed is insatiable—as long as the greed itself is still there, no amount of money will truly sat "There must be more money! There must be more money!" ////Money is not the answer to all our problems//// Paul childishly believes that money is the answer to all his problems, when in fact, his problems stem from greed, a lack of intimacy with his mother, Sadly, the money Paul has worked so hard to win doesn’t improve his mother’s spirits—instead, she just wants more. Lawrence demonstrates here that greed is insatiable—as long as the greed itself is still there, no amount of money will truly satisfy it. Quick and fun read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    pennyg

    Well that was creepy and not in a good way. I guess its a story of greed and the need to please. I really don't know what to make of it, maybe a very unhealthy relationship between children and parents and money and luck. Weird. Well that was creepy and not in a good way. I guess its a story of greed and the need to please. I really don't know what to make of it, maybe a very unhealthy relationship between children and parents and money and luck. Weird.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    First read this story either in high school or college and re-read it in the summer of 2019 or 2020.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brennan Wieland

    A short story about a boy and his quest to be "lucky". The boy knows that his family is struggling with money and he asks his mother how other people have more than they do. She says that some people are simply more "lucky" than others, and that their father was in fact, very unlucky. The boy begins searching for luck, and finds it while he's riding his rocking horse. Through some unknown force, the boy is able to predict the winner of the next horse race, after riding his rocking horse. The sto A short story about a boy and his quest to be "lucky". The boy knows that his family is struggling with money and he asks his mother how other people have more than they do. She says that some people are simply more "lucky" than others, and that their father was in fact, very unlucky. The boy begins searching for luck, and finds it while he's riding his rocking horse. Through some unknown force, the boy is able to predict the winner of the next horse race, after riding his rocking horse. The story ends with the boy struggling to keep up with the amount of money that he thinks his mother wants, because she continually desires more and more money. The boy dies one night after riding the rocking horse for a very long time. I suppose that the moral of the story is about the mother's greed. While the boy continually wins races, it isn't enough for his parents, who want more and more expensive items. The boy dies before ever getting what he wanted, which was to be loved by his mother, while she was caught up in a world where she could never have enough.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly

    A young boy (dead by the end of the story), in a family with a tragic pretentions on wealth, discovered that by riding his rocking-horse toy he could sometimes predict the winner of horse races. I read it several times, what the boy's uncle (his mother's brother) told his mother after he (the boy) had died yet I could not get its meaning. The uncle told the boy's mother: "My God, Hester, you're eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil of a son to the bad. But, poor devil, poor devil, he' A young boy (dead by the end of the story), in a family with a tragic pretentions on wealth, discovered that by riding his rocking-horse toy he could sometimes predict the winner of horse races. I read it several times, what the boy's uncle (his mother's brother) told his mother after he (the boy) had died yet I could not get its meaning. The uncle told the boy's mother: "My God, Hester, you're eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil of a son to the bad. But, poor devil, poor devil, he's best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking-horse to find a winner."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Menna Kh.

    One of the best short stories ever. Very beautifully written. This is a comfortably uncomfortable story about how a deadly sin could drive a boy mad. MOOOOORE.... MOOOOORE... I'm not going to say more, you have to read it! One of the best short stories ever. Very beautifully written. This is a comfortably uncomfortable story about how a deadly sin could drive a boy mad. MOOOOORE.... MOOOOORE... I'm not going to say more, you have to read it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    One of the great short stories of all time. A must for all readers, especially those who haven't latched on to the short story genre. Sometimes a short story can stick with you far longer than a full length novel. One of the great short stories of all time. A must for all readers, especially those who haven't latched on to the short story genre. Sometimes a short story can stick with you far longer than a full length novel.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brett

    Was my favorite short story for a very long time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eddie

    This tale solidifies DH Lawrence as one of the greatest short story writers ever.

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