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The Twice-dead King: Ruin

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A Warhammer 40,000 novel Pride is everything for the dynastic kings of the Necron race, who have awakened after millennia to see their empires occupied by foul beasts and simple minds. For the Necron Lord Oltyx, the Ithakas dynasty was his by right, but the machinations of the court see him stripped of his position and exiled to a forgotten world. READ IT BECAUSE See the stru A Warhammer 40,000 novel Pride is everything for the dynastic kings of the Necron race, who have awakened after millennia to see their empires occupied by foul beasts and simple minds. For the Necron Lord Oltyx, the Ithakas dynasty was his by right, but the machinations of the court see him stripped of his position and exiled to a forgotten world. READ IT BECAUSE See the struggles of the Necron court through their own eyes, and discover the lengths one Lord will go to for the status they desire. THE STORY Exiled to the miserable world of Sedh, the disgraced Necron Lord Oltyx is consumed with bitterness. Once heir to the throne of a dynasty, he now commands nothing but a dwindling garrison of warriors, in a never-ending struggle against Ork invaders. Oltyx can think of nothing but the prospect of vengeance against his betrayers, and the reclamation of his birthright. But the Orks are merely the harbingers of a truly unstoppable force. Unless Oltyx acts to save his dynasty, revenge will win him only ashes. And so he must return to the crownworld, and to the heart of the very court which cast him out. But what awaits there is a horror more profound than any invader, whose roots are tangled with the dark origins of the Necrons themselves.


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A Warhammer 40,000 novel Pride is everything for the dynastic kings of the Necron race, who have awakened after millennia to see their empires occupied by foul beasts and simple minds. For the Necron Lord Oltyx, the Ithakas dynasty was his by right, but the machinations of the court see him stripped of his position and exiled to a forgotten world. READ IT BECAUSE See the stru A Warhammer 40,000 novel Pride is everything for the dynastic kings of the Necron race, who have awakened after millennia to see their empires occupied by foul beasts and simple minds. For the Necron Lord Oltyx, the Ithakas dynasty was his by right, but the machinations of the court see him stripped of his position and exiled to a forgotten world. READ IT BECAUSE See the struggles of the Necron court through their own eyes, and discover the lengths one Lord will go to for the status they desire. THE STORY Exiled to the miserable world of Sedh, the disgraced Necron Lord Oltyx is consumed with bitterness. Once heir to the throne of a dynasty, he now commands nothing but a dwindling garrison of warriors, in a never-ending struggle against Ork invaders. Oltyx can think of nothing but the prospect of vengeance against his betrayers, and the reclamation of his birthright. But the Orks are merely the harbingers of a truly unstoppable force. Unless Oltyx acts to save his dynasty, revenge will win him only ashes. And so he must return to the crownworld, and to the heart of the very court which cast him out. But what awaits there is a horror more profound than any invader, whose roots are tangled with the dark origins of the Necrons themselves.

30 review for The Twice-dead King: Ruin

  1. 5 out of 5

    Juliano Dutra

    3.5

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zeki Czen

    An awesome book. I read it straight through in 2 sittings. There's no shortage of generic space marine novels from Black Library, which makes almost every xenos novel a refreshing read. But this book would be a gem regardless. Excellent characterization and credibly explores a narrative from a thoroughly non-human perspective. The main character manages to both be relatable yet alien and the exploration of the characters is one of the best parts of it without ever bogging down the narrative. It's An awesome book. I read it straight through in 2 sittings. There's no shortage of generic space marine novels from Black Library, which makes almost every xenos novel a refreshing read. But this book would be a gem regardless. Excellent characterization and credibly explores a narrative from a thoroughly non-human perspective. The main character manages to both be relatable yet alien and the exploration of the characters is one of the best parts of it without ever bogging down the narrative. It's as tightly written as Crowley's excellent novella Severed. I hope he continues to publish such well written novels for Black Library

  3. 4 out of 5

    AA_Logan

    A magnificent book, one that showcases the potential of the Warhammer 40,000 universe. The Twice Dead King: Ruin is an intelligent piece of science fiction that creates a complex alien society, a fantastic adventure and action blockbuster, a reflection on mortality and familial obligation as well as the first Black Library book that I can recall reading to feature the word ‘silly’. The publisher, for all it’s recent diminished output, is continuing to accompany it’s traditional (good!) fare with A magnificent book, one that showcases the potential of the Warhammer 40,000 universe. The Twice Dead King: Ruin is an intelligent piece of science fiction that creates a complex alien society, a fantastic adventure and action blockbuster, a reflection on mortality and familial obligation as well as the first Black Library book that I can recall reading to feature the word ‘silly’. The publisher, for all it’s recent diminished output, is continuing to accompany it’s traditional (good!) fare with more unusual books, and this is another example of one of these. One of the strengths of Crowley’s previous BL novel, Ghazghkull was the way in which it used orks as a mirror to look at the Imperium; it is every bit as much of a book about humanity as it is their fungoid nemesis. We get glimpses of both these cultures here through yet another set of eyes- Oltyx’ analysis of Astartes is beautifully insightful- but Ruin takes a different tack, fully immersing the reader in Necrontyr culture and society for chapters at a time. Functionally immortal, with individual memories that can be traced back tens of millions of years, yet capable of slowing down time to take advantage of individual nanoseconds, Necrons are potentially very hard to relate to. Yet as with his prior novella Severed, Crowley does achieve this. The novel emphasises their literally alien nature whilst exploring the effects that their translation to their current form has affected their society and individual relationships in all-to-human ways. Yes, as you read you’ll relate to the experiences of impossibly ancient Xenos murder-bots only to be reminded in the next sentence of ways in which they’re still incomprehensible. There are plenty of analogues in the ways in which they communicate- emojis for emphasis, body language conveying messages at odds with what is spoken, an individual with a fascination for cleaning rank upon rank of Necron warriors, but these things are used in ways far removed from humanity. Necrontyr culture, both pre- and post-transference is explored in wonderful detail, and it is illuminating to see what aspects were retained once they’d been granted cursed immortality. Like the Imperium of Man, and indeed the various Eldar factions, the Necrons in 40K are a doomed society in decline, raging against the dying of the light and trying to keep hold of their rapidly fading grandeur, and this novels highlights how, like these ‘peers’, it’s largely their own hubris that puts them in this position. The Necrons in this book dub anything living as part of the ‘Unclean’, which stems from a revulsion of the physical form as much as anything else, though the contempt that they view the lesser races in is palpable. Hidebound by inevitable and necessary(?) hierarchies as much as the Imperium is, Necron society as depicted in this book is a rich playground for storytelling. Tonally different to Crowley’s previous Necron work, as well as Rath’s Necron novel, Ruin has a lightness running throughout it that belies the profound sadness it sometimes has; it’s easy reading but isn’t afraid to get heavy on the pseudo-science or actual emotional heft. It’s not all cerebral storytelling, mind- there’s no way the author wrote, say, the combat scenes in chapter 17, without anything other than a big stupid grin on his face- they’re so deliciously OTT, taking full advantage of the ridiculous capabilities of high-ranking Necrons. Everything is set up really nicely for the story to be continued, but it works well as a stand-alone novel, one where some knowledge of the setting would be desirable but not essential. Had GW not tarried with the delivery of my copy of the special edition (I’m still waiting…), I’d have missed out on the excellent job that Richard Reed does narrating this book- the audio is really very good, and my enjoyment is down in no small to his performance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Unseen Library

    Rating of 4.75. Intriguing new author Nate Crowley presents one of the most complex and fascinating Warhammer 40,000 novels I had the pleasure of reading, The Twice-Dead King: Ruin, an epic and thrilling novel that explores one of the most intriguing races in the canon, the Necrons. In the chaotic and war-striven future of the 41st millennium, many powerful and dangerous races fight for domination and destruction. However, no race is more mysterious or feared than the immortal beings known as the Rating of 4.75. Intriguing new author Nate Crowley presents one of the most complex and fascinating Warhammer 40,000 novels I had the pleasure of reading, The Twice-Dead King: Ruin, an epic and thrilling novel that explores one of the most intriguing races in the canon, the Necrons. In the chaotic and war-striven future of the 41st millennium, many powerful and dangerous races fight for domination and destruction. However, no race is more mysterious or feared than the immortal beings known as the Necrons. The Necrons are an ancient and ruthless race who, thousands of years ago, sacrificed their mortality and humanity to defeat a powerful enemy as well as death itself. Forced into thousands of years of hibernation after their great victory, the Necrons are now slowly awakening to reclaim their empire by destroying all life in the galaxy. However, despite their intense belief in themselves, the Necrons are a dying race, gradually being whittled down by time, madness, and the unceasing tide of organic life they are forced to constantly fight against. None know this better that Oltyx, a bitter and resentful Necron Lord who has been banished to the wretched border world of Sedh. Once heir to the throne of a mighty and glorious dynasty, he now only has control of a small garrison of degraded warriors who are slowly dwindling under constant attacks from Ork raiders attempting to invade the Necron empire. As Oltyx dreams about vengeance and reclaiming his birthright, he finds himself facing an immense threat that could spell the doom of his dynasty and the entire Necron race. The invading Orks are only the precursor of a larger and much more powerful enemy, one his small force has no chance of defeating. With no other option, Oltyx is forced to return to his dynasty’s crownworld and beg for reinforcements from the court who cast him out. However, his return uncovers something far more disturbing than he could have ever imagined. A twisted horror now lies within the heart of Oltyx’s dynasty, bringing only madness and bloodshed with it. To ensure his people’s survival, Oltyx must face the curse of the Necrons and the pure horror of a twice-dead king. To see the full review, click on the link below: https://unseenlibrary.com/2021/11/12/... For other exciting reviews and content, check out my blog at: https://unseenlibrary.com/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Hayward

    What Nate has done here is nothing short of remarkable. There’s no way that my attempts to describe the craft that has gone into this book will do justice to the nuanced, intelligent and sensitive exploration of the reality of *being* Necron within these pages. But - I’ve just put it down and loved it so much I had to come here and talk about it. For me to like a story, I have to care about the protagonist. For me to love a story, it has to genuinely open up my mind to new ways of being, and new What Nate has done here is nothing short of remarkable. There’s no way that my attempts to describe the craft that has gone into this book will do justice to the nuanced, intelligent and sensitive exploration of the reality of *being* Necron within these pages. But - I’ve just put it down and loved it so much I had to come here and talk about it. For me to like a story, I have to care about the protagonist. For me to love a story, it has to genuinely open up my mind to new ways of being, and new realities of existing. And the Twice Dead King does this - I was immediately hooked into the pride, the fear, the horror of existing throughout the cold expanse of aeons - who you are when your physical self has gone, and who the others are that you knew before. Nate tells a story on an epic scale with humour, reality and respect for the Necron protagonists - they are all believable and engaging individuals, and you are immediately drawn into their reality. And the reality Nate has crafted is the really impressive thing here. It would be absolutely wrong to say that this book humanises Necrons, because it doesn’t. That would do a disservice to the care Nate has taken to craft a reality and lived experience that is uniquely Necron, in the way the characters perceive the world, their plight, their past, their future and how they communicate, the memories and emotions that remain and how they process them. In summary - I loved it to bits and Necrons are now my fave.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jon Wilson

    A genuinely superb book. I've never really beem terribly interested in Necrons as a 40k faction - felt they lacked character and ecisted as sort of motivation-free generic bad guys (albeit with a cool origin story). I only picked this up on the strength of Nate's games journalism. I'm so glad I did. It's funny, full of evocative writing and neat turns of phrase, wonderful characters, and it's surprisingly touching. It makes the space skeletons relatable, which is no mean feat, and I really loved A genuinely superb book. I've never really beem terribly interested in Necrons as a 40k faction - felt they lacked character and ecisted as sort of motivation-free generic bad guys (albeit with a cool origin story). I only picked this up on the strength of Nate's games journalism. I'm so glad I did. It's funny, full of evocative writing and neat turns of phrase, wonderful characters, and it's surprisingly touching. It makes the space skeletons relatable, which is no mean feat, and I really loved it. Might start a Necron army, once I've finished my other armies, some time in the next three decades.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    The Twice Dead King grabbed me right from the beginning and was a treat all the way through. Much like the also excellent The Infinite and the Divine, the story fleshes out the Necrons both in the past and in galaxy's current situation. It also gives a fair bit of development to the Flayed Ones and how this particular dynasty of Necrons handles their curse. I am enthusiastically waiting for the next book! The Twice Dead King grabbed me right from the beginning and was a treat all the way through. Much like the also excellent The Infinite and the Divine, the story fleshes out the Necrons both in the past and in galaxy's current situation. It also gives a fair bit of development to the Flayed Ones and how this particular dynasty of Necrons handles their curse. I am enthusiastically waiting for the next book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    John McDonnell

    A good story and gives the viewpoint of the Necrontyr. Certainly seems to be some inconsistency with older lore but on the whole I enjoyed this story and hope that some "mortality" shows itself in the Necrontyr. Well worth reading, better as a listen. A good story and gives the viewpoint of the Necrontyr. Certainly seems to be some inconsistency with older lore but on the whole I enjoyed this story and hope that some "mortality" shows itself in the Necrontyr. Well worth reading, better as a listen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sunlogix

    The story feels a bit like a storm in a tea cup with very limited impact on the wh40k universe, or even the Necrons themselves. The MC is a bore and he seems quite resistant to the "life lessons" he experiences. The story feels a bit like a storm in a tea cup with very limited impact on the wh40k universe, or even the Necrons themselves. The MC is a bore and he seems quite resistant to the "life lessons" he experiences.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laurence

    Absolutely loved this, at times moving, epic and hysterical. Not sure you actually need to know anything about the setting to enjoy the scifi weirdness. Captures the heartbreak of being billion year old beings with poor interpersonal relationship skills. Wonderful from start to finish.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Sacco

    After Severed, Nate Crowley keeps writing excellent Necron stories with interesting characters and great world building.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alpharius(Possibly)

    My god this was good. Possibly one of the best Warhammer books out there, it appears Nate Crowley can do no wrong

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mal

    A crackingly good Necron story. More of this please Nate!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael James Dillon

  15. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  16. 4 out of 5

    Travis Hoffman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex Smith

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cory Rathbun

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Han

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reinis

  21. 5 out of 5

    jiga wa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Mellado

  23. 4 out of 5

    Primafacia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tichey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Arvid Hallman

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael de Mauregne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christer Dørmænen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kamil Polus

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steven Baldwin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aleksander

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