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Disconnected: How to Stay Human in an Online World

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Millennials might have grown up online but now they want to log off. And it's not just millennials. A year of lockdowns, Zoom meetings and reduced physical contact has made us more dependent on the internet than ever before - but has it lost its humanity? Our focus on community and real connection has been sent off-course and we're becoming more aware of how the algorithm m Millennials might have grown up online but now they want to log off. And it's not just millennials. A year of lockdowns, Zoom meetings and reduced physical contact has made us more dependent on the internet than ever before - but has it lost its humanity? Our focus on community and real connection has been sent off-course and we're becoming more aware of how the algorithm manipulates us and how our data has made us a product to be sold. So, where do we go from here and how can we get back on track? (Dis)connected examines these topics and offers tangible tips and advice for those of us who might feel a little lost right now and want to find themselves again.


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Millennials might have grown up online but now they want to log off. And it's not just millennials. A year of lockdowns, Zoom meetings and reduced physical contact has made us more dependent on the internet than ever before - but has it lost its humanity? Our focus on community and real connection has been sent off-course and we're becoming more aware of how the algorithm m Millennials might have grown up online but now they want to log off. And it's not just millennials. A year of lockdowns, Zoom meetings and reduced physical contact has made us more dependent on the internet than ever before - but has it lost its humanity? Our focus on community and real connection has been sent off-course and we're becoming more aware of how the algorithm manipulates us and how our data has made us a product to be sold. So, where do we go from here and how can we get back on track? (Dis)connected examines these topics and offers tangible tips and advice for those of us who might feel a little lost right now and want to find themselves again.

30 review for Disconnected: How to Stay Human in an Online World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nisha Joshi

    Do we post every detail of our lives on social media? Have we created a SM alter-ego for ourselves? Why do we reach for the phone the first thing in the morning? Social media has slowly but surely taken over our lives. As someone who was born in the mid-80s in India, I (and my generation) have grown up with the invention and growth of technology. From playing cassettes in Walkmans to burning CDs with our favourite songs to switching to the pen drive (I see I forgot the infamous floppy disk altoge Do we post every detail of our lives on social media? Have we created a SM alter-ego for ourselves? Why do we reach for the phone the first thing in the morning? Social media has slowly but surely taken over our lives. As someone who was born in the mid-80s in India, I (and my generation) have grown up with the invention and growth of technology. From playing cassettes in Walkmans to burning CDs with our favourite songs to switching to the pen drive (I see I forgot the infamous floppy disk altogether!), we have seen it all. Now we create playlists on Spotify and share them for all to see. If the purpose of social media was to bring people together, it did succeed in the initial years. Long-lost friends were found, and NRI relatives were brought back into the fold. But slowly, we are all drifting off again. Because how interested are we really in knowing what some distant friend or relative is doing? The author, Emma Gannon, is a prominent influencer in the Twitter and Instagram space. However, after a few years of popularity, she talks about how she felt the need to connect with a few real people rather than engage with hundreds of unknown ones who don't know (and don't give a damn) about how our lives are. All of them form their opinions based on a photo or a tweet and rarely change them. In fact, we all have become so attuned to these unknown followers' reactions that we think a lot before posting something online - will those people "like" it? With quick prompts, the author encourages us to disconnect: put down the phone and look at the world around us. She has peppered the narrative with anecdotes that could feature any of us. It is a short audiobook (2+ hours) that I finished in an afternoon but it kept me thinking for quite a while. 4.5 stars. Thanks to Netgalley and Andrews McMeel Audio for the audio ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky Loveday-Dewis

    I was really excited to read this book, as I'm very keen to spend less time on my phone and more time 'staying human', as the tagline says. There are some excellent points in this book and Emma has clearly done her research. However, I became far too distracted by the countless grammatical errors and am surprised that this book has been printed when so many sentences simply don't make sense. I also found it distracting when the "quick prompts" were slapped half-way through a sentence... very odd I was really excited to read this book, as I'm very keen to spend less time on my phone and more time 'staying human', as the tagline says. There are some excellent points in this book and Emma has clearly done her research. However, I became far too distracted by the countless grammatical errors and am surprised that this book has been printed when so many sentences simply don't make sense. I also found it distracting when the "quick prompts" were slapped half-way through a sentence... very odd and unnecessary. I will be noting the "quick prompts" and trying to use them in my daily life, but my copy is now full of book darts where so many grammatical errors distracted from the point.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Disconnected provides fantastic insight to finding ways to rediscover ones self in a consistently connected society. It is a joke that we would not know what to do without the internet. Yet, the more connected we are, it is no longer a joke. I work from home, so I'm always plugged in. I mentioned that to someone while connected to Zoom and chatting over the vpn on my college's server. I realized at that moment that it was no longer a joke. I've been so plugged in and completely tuned out the worl Disconnected provides fantastic insight to finding ways to rediscover ones self in a consistently connected society. It is a joke that we would not know what to do without the internet. Yet, the more connected we are, it is no longer a joke. I work from home, so I'm always plugged in. I mentioned that to someone while connected to Zoom and chatting over the vpn on my college's server. I realized at that moment that it was no longer a joke. I've been so plugged in and completely tuned out the world around that Emma's book merely scratches the surface for me. Outside my family, I realized I haven't had human interaction face-to-face in nearly a year. Taking a few prompts from Disconnected, I plan to start reconnecting with the world around me. I hope Emma writes more on this. Her view of how Twitter virtually decided everything for her is exactly how I feel about Instagram now, Thank you to the publisher, Emma Gannon, and Netgalley for the opportunity to review this insightful e-arc.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laur

    I enjoyed Disconnected by Emma Gannon so much! What a brilliant and relevant topic to talk about in such a profound and personal way! As everything is so technologic these days, the vast majority of us, I imagine, would have a hard time going without cell phones, computers, social media accounts, email, etc. Ai is the a wave of the future. Are we becoming like machines? Losing our humanity? Disconnected examines multiple topics regarding many of devices above, and the entrapment many have been co I enjoyed Disconnected by Emma Gannon so much! What a brilliant and relevant topic to talk about in such a profound and personal way! As everything is so technologic these days, the vast majority of us, I imagine, would have a hard time going without cell phones, computers, social media accounts, email, etc. Ai is the a wave of the future. Are we becoming like machines? Losing our humanity? Disconnected examines multiple topics regarding many of devices above, and the entrapment many have been consumed in (even more so since mandated isolation through the pandemic). She offers tangible tips (through prompts in the book) and advice for those of us who might feel a little lost and are looking to find our real-life selves again. Disconnected is an eye-opener. Informative, intuitive, perceptively it's right on point, I found the book to helpful and thought provoking. The author, Emma Gannon, was also the audio book narrator, and her voice was inspiring and a pure joy to listen to. I would listen to anything she would write/narrate. This was a sensational book, relatable on every level! 5 STARS! My thanks to NetGalley, Andrews McMeel Audio, and Emma Gannon for an AAC in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own..

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I was really excited to read this book as I've been spending a lot of time on the internet as a content creator. And I was right! It offers a really good insight on why we might be *a little bit* addicted to the internet and the world of social media and how to reconnect with our daily lives. It definitely has benefited me and if you're looking for something to help you understand more about how it all might affect our lifestyle and why it's important to remember it's like another little world o I was really excited to read this book as I've been spending a lot of time on the internet as a content creator. And I was right! It offers a really good insight on why we might be *a little bit* addicted to the internet and the world of social media and how to reconnect with our daily lives. It definitely has benefited me and if you're looking for something to help you understand more about how it all might affect our lifestyle and why it's important to remember it's like another little world of our own we can make better use of, this book is perfect! The author makes excellent points and you know what I love most about it? It's not judgemental!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle McGrane

    “According to the online magazine “Inc.”, we tap, swipe and click on our phones 2,617 times per day.” Emma Gannon narrates the audiobook version of her latest book, “Disconnected”. She reads flawlessly. The clarity of her diction, her tone and reading speed make for a pleasant listening experience. “Disconnected” is a book which I believe will benefit anyone who spends time on the internet and who has a social media account. It’s not about digital detoxing but rather about making your time on soci “According to the online magazine “Inc.”, we tap, swipe and click on our phones 2,617 times per day.” Emma Gannon narrates the audiobook version of her latest book, “Disconnected”. She reads flawlessly. The clarity of her diction, her tone and reading speed make for a pleasant listening experience. “Disconnected” is a book which I believe will benefit anyone who spends time on the internet and who has a social media account. It’s not about digital detoxing but rather about making your time on social media count so your days and nights are not reduced to endless scrolling. Gannon writes about the importance of living in the present, spending time connecting with your loved ones offline and doing more of the things which make you happy, in order to live a more balanced life. “Disconnect” is wise, considered, practical and well written. It includes frequent prompts, allowing you to reflect on your own use of time. It is food for thought for anyone who experiences internet fatigue and others who are frustrated with the lack of freedom and quality time in their days due to ingrained social media habits. I can’t recommend it highly enough. Synopsis Lockdowns, Zoom meetings, and reduced physical contact have made us more dependent on the internet than ever before—and now we want to log off. “Disconnected” is a little book about reclaiming our humanity in our increasingly digitized, monetized world. Our focus on community and real connection has been sent off-course, and we're becoming more aware of how the algorithm manipulates us and how our data has made us a product to be sold. So, where do we go from here, and how can we get back on track? “Disconnected” examines these topics and offers tangible tips and advice for those of us who might feel a little lost and are looking to find our real-life selves again. Many thanks to @NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Audio for the advanced audiobook.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Marshall-Murray

    Emma Gannon’s Dis-connected brings a re-awakening to the concept of an offline world after the Pandemic lockdowns have ceased. After being forced almost entirely online during the pandemic, Gannon’s latest release prompts us to consider taking time for ourselves, re-connecting with friends and family, and setting boundaries for our e-self. A thought provoking, quick read about the social media we use and how we have moved from less social and more consumption media. This book has great points on Emma Gannon’s Dis-connected brings a re-awakening to the concept of an offline world after the Pandemic lockdowns have ceased. After being forced almost entirely online during the pandemic, Gannon’s latest release prompts us to consider taking time for ourselves, re-connecting with friends and family, and setting boundaries for our e-self. A thought provoking, quick read about the social media we use and how we have moved from less social and more consumption media. This book has great points on ending Cancel culture; how about we use a semicolon and not a full stop? As simple as it seems being told to open dialogue instead of shutting others off - it’s an imperative piece of this book and a very important statement. Have we became too used to an urgency in communication that has also resulted in an urgency to stop communicating? I enjoyed the quick prompts and lists used within this book - I feel it helped break up text and made it more easily consumed - the prompts also allowed for moments of self reflection, which I intend to use in a journal going forward. Thank you, Andrews McMeel Publishing & NetGalley for the Advanced E-copy of this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    liz b

    3/5 stars - When I started reading this, I was completely expecting a "kids these days" or "technology is eating your brain" kind of argument. That's not what I got. Gannon delivered a sobering (but not perfect) description of our digital lives, along with fun, specific prompts for self-reflection. I ironically and unfortunately had to read this book on my phone, basically scrolling through a loooong PDF. I was distracted at least every 5-10 minutes by some kind of notification. It was a little 3/5 stars - When I started reading this, I was completely expecting a "kids these days" or "technology is eating your brain" kind of argument. That's not what I got. Gannon delivered a sobering (but not perfect) description of our digital lives, along with fun, specific prompts for self-reflection. I ironically and unfortunately had to read this book on my phone, basically scrolling through a loooong PDF. I was distracted at least every 5-10 minutes by some kind of notification. It was a little unsettling but spoke to a lot of what I read. I made a point to stop and write several times (with paper and pen instead of my notes app, begrudgingly) in response to the prompts scattered throughout. I don't think the prompts are strictly for writing, but journaling comes naturally to me. It's not for everyone, and it takes quite a bit of time, but this was a really effective way for me to reflect. I loved the prompts and will likely go back to them in the future. My main qualm with this book is that it somewhat lacks awareness of the current state of social media for young people. Gannon talks at length about influencers and the insecurity embedded within one's "like" count, but doesn't acknowledge, for example, the new and dangerous lack of anonymity for content creators on TikTok, or the prospect of having a "finsta." At one point, Gannon suggests that people are widely starting to lose interest in social media entirely. Older millennials might be, but as a middle school teacher I can say confidently that Gen Z-ers are more addicted than ever. This is really specific, but I also took issue with Gannon's explicit definition of a tribe as "a group of people who need you to do certain things in order for them to accept you." I'm Indigenous and referring to your group of friends as a "tribe" is inherently appropriative/just kind of weird. Sorry not sorry. Still, this book is jam-packed with good advice. I'm generally not a self-help reader, but Gannon offered a lot of rich suggestions for community building, reflecting, unplugging, and de-stressing. I recommend this book to anyone concerned about their screen time or general inability to stop scrolling. Thanks NetGalley for allowing me to read this for free.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Manisha

    I'm always excited about content (ugh this word) that deals with being online and reshaping our online ecosystems. I was quite intrigued because this book seemed to recognize that we each have a unique experience on the internet and was seeking to address how we get the best out of it. Anything that does not immediately say "Internet. BAD. Go outside and SMELL the roses" is a perspective i want to hear about! It did however spend a lot of time doing exactly that. I liked the exploration into how h I'm always excited about content (ugh this word) that deals with being online and reshaping our online ecosystems. I was quite intrigued because this book seemed to recognize that we each have a unique experience on the internet and was seeking to address how we get the best out of it. Anything that does not immediately say "Internet. BAD. Go outside and SMELL the roses" is a perspective i want to hear about! It did however spend a lot of time doing exactly that. I liked the exploration into how humans have always wanted to display things they like - be it above their fireplace in stone huts or on Instagram. Wanting our display to be lauded is just something social media has thrown into the mix. The book steers far from a deep dive though. It can be called an elongated essay, maybe. I listened to the audio-book and it wasn't quite clear to me when we moved from one section to the other. Another thing that did not work for me in the audio format were the "quick prompts". These would suddenly pop up out from nowhere and I could not really absorb any of it coherently. My understanding is most people listen to audiobooks while doing some other activity - cooking, walking or cleaning? The prompts being pushed to the end of the chapter, like a summary , would give people a chance to make note of them if they'd like to. Soothing book to listen to, but I did not feel like I learnt much that was new. 2.5 Stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    Megan Chasteen

    Thanks to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel for free digital copy and libro.fm for the educator ALC! This book will be out 5/31! What is your relationship with social media? Obviously, I spend a lot of time on this app, and definitely struggle at times with feeling overwhelmed with Instagram, social media, and my connection to my phone in general. I went into this thinking book thinking it was going to perhaps be...annoying (😂) and I was very pleasantly surprised. I feel like Gannon speaks to all of t Thanks to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel for free digital copy and libro.fm for the educator ALC! This book will be out 5/31! What is your relationship with social media? Obviously, I spend a lot of time on this app, and definitely struggle at times with feeling overwhelmed with Instagram, social media, and my connection to my phone in general. I went into this thinking book thinking it was going to perhaps be...annoying (😂) and I was very pleasantly surprised. I feel like Gannon speaks to all of the issues/struggles I have been seeing/thinking about/dealing with surround the internet and social media. She brings in real-world examples and experiences and offers both quick and longer practices to help you think more critically (in a positive way) about your relationship with social media and the internet in general. I was sort of expecting this book to feel preachy and it didn't feel that way AT ALL. She absolutely does not try to tell the reader that in order to have a more fulfilled life they need to shut off everything/completely disconnect. This book is short, quick, and completely accessible. While I read a little of the ebook, I listened to this primarily on audio, and I do want to get a copy of this book to spend some more time reflecting on the practices and prompts Gannon offers. I definitely recommend if you are feeling blah with social media and/or want to try some things to change your perspective with it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashleah

    Disconnected: How to Stay Human in an Online World is a self-help book by Emma Gannon. The ebook version is 128 pages. I listened to the audiobook, which clocks in at three hours and is narrated by the author. This book is a quick read about how we as humans have become more dependent on the internet--especially during the pandemic--while also reducing physical contact. Gannon does a deep dive into the manipulation of algorithms, our data as salable products, and where we might be able to go fro Disconnected: How to Stay Human in an Online World is a self-help book by Emma Gannon. The ebook version is 128 pages. I listened to the audiobook, which clocks in at three hours and is narrated by the author. This book is a quick read about how we as humans have become more dependent on the internet--especially during the pandemic--while also reducing physical contact. Gannon does a deep dive into the manipulation of algorithms, our data as salable products, and where we might be able to go from here. At the ends of chapters, she provides easy-to-follow "quick prompts" to help remind yourself who you really are outside of the always-connected internet. I was nodding in agreement a lot while listening to this book. I felt very seen by this book, partly because I am also an "elder millennial" like the author. In general, I really liked her prose! I think I'll have to check out her podcast, Ctrl Alt Delete. Special thanks to Andrews McMeel Publishing and NetGalley for providing an audio galley of this book for me to review. All opinions contained herein are my own. The audiobook version of Disconnected: How to Stay Human in an Online World releases on May 31st, 2022.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gemma Marie

    This book made me realize how social media creates an illusion of being well-connected when in fact it can make one feel so disconnected, alone, and lonely. As a teacher in the new normal educational setting, social media is one of the portals I use to connected with my students. It also serves as an alternative learning management system because it's free, accessible to students, and easy to navigate. But it also has its downsides. My students are easoly distracted and has short retention span. This book made me realize how social media creates an illusion of being well-connected when in fact it can make one feel so disconnected, alone, and lonely. As a teacher in the new normal educational setting, social media is one of the portals I use to connected with my students. It also serves as an alternative learning management system because it's free, accessible to students, and easy to navigate. But it also has its downsides. My students are easoly distracted and has short retention span. I also experience the same. Added to this, misinformation is rampant in social media sites. This book gave me ideas through helpful and precise prompts that will enable me to reflect and focus on how I use social media, the Internet in general, to my advantage. Added to this, the author also presented a lot of helpful ideas to make social media work for us and not against us. At the end of each chapter is a journal or writing activity that I am sure my students will enjoy too.

  13. 4 out of 5

    pawsreadrepeat

    As someone who feels like I spend too much time online, I jumped at the chance to listen to this book! I found it interesting how much of our lives revolve around internet use and how quickly it took over without me really realzing it. As a result, I find myself thinking intentionally about my internet use and whether I really need to be online or not. I liked the prompts that are used, they have helped me change my behavior and set better boundaries. I liked the narrator and am enjoying the qui As someone who feels like I spend too much time online, I jumped at the chance to listen to this book! I found it interesting how much of our lives revolve around internet use and how quickly it took over without me really realzing it. As a result, I find myself thinking intentionally about my internet use and whether I really need to be online or not. I liked the prompts that are used, they have helped me change my behavior and set better boundaries. I liked the narrator and am enjoying the quiet space when I'm not mindlessly scrolling on social media. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to improve their relationship with the internet and social media. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily. Thank you, NetGalley.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jillian | pining_for_paperbacks

    This book came to me at the right time. I have been feeling too attached to social media and my phone in general. This book was a great tool for self reflection. Why am I on the internet? Who am I doing this for? Do likes/followers mean success? Why are we always trying to make a better machine? One line that stood out to me was “What can we do that machines can’t?” I absolutely love that! That line brought me back down Earth to really think about what I can do as a human without technology. Too This book came to me at the right time. I have been feeling too attached to social media and my phone in general. This book was a great tool for self reflection. Why am I on the internet? Who am I doing this for? Do likes/followers mean success? Why are we always trying to make a better machine? One line that stood out to me was “What can we do that machines can’t?” I absolutely love that! That line brought me back down Earth to really think about what I can do as a human without technology. Too many of us have grown up surrounded by technology and we’ve forgotten or never learned how to live without our extra “limb”. It makes me wonder what I’m truly capable of accomplishing without the internet as my security blanket.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jillian | pining_for_paperbacks

    This book came to me at the right time. I have been feeling too attached to social media and my phone in general. This book was a great tool for self reflection. Why am I on the internet? Who am I doing this for? Do likes/followers mean success? Why are we always trying to make a better machine? One line that stood out to me was “What can we do that machines can’t?” I absolutely love that! That line brought me back down Earth to really think about what I can do as a human without technology. Too This book came to me at the right time. I have been feeling too attached to social media and my phone in general. This book was a great tool for self reflection. Why am I on the internet? Who am I doing this for? Do likes/followers mean success? Why are we always trying to make a better machine? One line that stood out to me was “What can we do that machines can’t?” I absolutely love that! That line brought me back down Earth to really think about what I can do as a human without technology. Too many of us have grown up surrounded by technology and we’ve forgotten or never learned how to live without our extra “limb”. It makes me wonder what I’m truly capable of accomplishing without the internet as my security blanket.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Antonia Brown

    This is a great short read full of sensible tips about being more truly connected and less shackled to our online worlds. I was worried it would be preachy and oversimplify things, but this wasn't the case. I enjoyed the authors ability to recognise her own failings and use them to describe possible ways out, without suggesting she had it all sorted already. I'm also a 'geriatric millenial' so there was loads in here which I connected to (no pun intended!) and I'll definitely try some of the pro This is a great short read full of sensible tips about being more truly connected and less shackled to our online worlds. I was worried it would be preachy and oversimplify things, but this wasn't the case. I enjoyed the authors ability to recognise her own failings and use them to describe possible ways out, without suggesting she had it all sorted already. I'm also a 'geriatric millenial' so there was loads in here which I connected to (no pun intended!) and I'll definitely try some of the prompts and practical ideas over the coming months, while also being comfortable that o won't get it all right straight off the bat!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Some helpful tips but not as many as expected .The author mainly shares her own experiences and touches on a range of topics and reads more as a autobiography. The flow of the book gets broken with the placement of the excersizes

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessi Collier Wakefield

    It was a reminder of how to remain sane and still connect with social media. I feel these were lessons i already learned along the way, but this could help those who see themselves in trouble and need a life raft. Thank you Libro.fm for my copy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dani Boise

    I loved that this is narrated by the author. I thought she did a great job explaining her points. I will likely take away a few ideas from this

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stella

    Audiobook provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. (RTC)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    In Disconnected, Emma Gannon acknowledges that it is not possible to completely disengage from the internet and specifically social media. However, she does look at how to keep it from bringing down your quality of life. She includes tips on stepping away from our phone and engaging in the “real” world and has prompts for the reader to reflect on their own social media usage. I like that the author narrated her own audiobook. I think that there are a lot of people out there who will be able to re In Disconnected, Emma Gannon acknowledges that it is not possible to completely disengage from the internet and specifically social media. However, she does look at how to keep it from bringing down your quality of life. She includes tips on stepping away from our phone and engaging in the “real” world and has prompts for the reader to reflect on their own social media usage. I like that the author narrated her own audiobook. I think that there are a lot of people out there who will be able to relate to the points this book is making; however, I wasn’t one of them. I would say the book is mainly aimed at millennials, as Emma tackles the issues of always being connected from her own personal experience, which is likely to be different from younger people’s experience. The prompts would have been better at the end of each chapter instead of in the middle. Many thanks to NetGalley for providing me an audio ARC of this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kirsi

    Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to listen to this audiobook in exchange for an honest review. This audiobook was an interesting peek into the way the Internet has taken over our lives and, in some ways, has us squirming in a chokehold we aren't even trying to escape. I'm one of those people whose childhood involved a lot more running around outside with friends and spending every extra minute at the local stable than computers and smartphones. I got my first mobile phone at the age of Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to listen to this audiobook in exchange for an honest review. This audiobook was an interesting peek into the way the Internet has taken over our lives and, in some ways, has us squirming in a chokehold we aren't even trying to escape. I'm one of those people whose childhood involved a lot more running around outside with friends and spending every extra minute at the local stable than computers and smartphones. I got my first mobile phone at the age of 17, for crying out loud, the thing cost a fortune and could be used for exactly two things - calling and texting. Right now, though, I'm just as bad as everybody else. Computers are an absolute must in my line of work, and I spend far, far too much time hunched over my smartphone in my free time. I worry constantly about my teenager, who was born into this craziness and considers it to be perfectly normal, because all her friends are exactly the same. Mother's Day is coming up, and after listening to this audiobook I decided to tell my family to forget about the roses and other paraphernalia - what I want, and what I'm going to insist upon this year, is a smartphone-free day. My family is not going to cheer, I suspect, but that's just too bad. Roses aren't going to cut it this time. In a nutshell, this audiobook was a welcome reminder to step back and take a critical look at your online presence and social media consumption. Are you the same person online and in real life? Do you actually have real connections with the people you are 'friends' with? Are you following accounts that make you miserable, or do you get something meaningful out of them? Just how addicted are you to that smartphone you're holding right now? All important questions that deserve an answer. I can't say that this audiobook had any substantial new information - if you've ever been the slightest bit worried about your screen time, you'll already be aware of these things - but it was still a little nudge and a reminder to keep thinking. There are also many simple and useful exercises to try, like calling somebody you haven't heard from in years instead of just clicking 'like' on their post. The audiobook was also very well narrated (by the author herself, I believe) and pleasant to listen to.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    If you are currently re-examining your relationship to social media, or trying to re-form your relationship to the internet in general, RUN to your nearest bookstore to pick up this book. I've read a spate of books about modern society's relationship to the internet, and I think this is one of the best. It is definitely the most helpful because Emma Gannon included workbook-esque prompts you can complete that help you reflect on yourself as a citizen of the net/ a human. This is a piece that is so If you are currently re-examining your relationship to social media, or trying to re-form your relationship to the internet in general, RUN to your nearest bookstore to pick up this book. I've read a spate of books about modern society's relationship to the internet, and I think this is one of the best. It is definitely the most helpful because Emma Gannon included workbook-esque prompts you can complete that help you reflect on yourself as a citizen of the net/ a human. This is a piece that is so needed because Gannon writes from a genuine place because of her own relationship to social media. Unlike other writers/pundits about this topic, Gannon does not shame her reader. She doesn't prescribe, she doesn't tell us what we should or shouldn't do. She talks about what we can do. She talks about how we can re-frame not reject. It's extremely refreshing to hear these takes from someone who acknowledges that cutting out all social media / internet is not just hard, it can literally be impossible. What she does focus on is ideas, tips and tricks about how to bring our humanity online. How to re connect with ourselves and others offline while simultaneously using the internet as a force for strong communities and conversations. Emma Gannon writes in a young, fresh voice that makes you feel like you're just having a chat with your friend. What I appreciated the most was how she talks about her own need for validation on social media as it's something we all experienced. I appreciate how open she is about that. This is such a short, quick read, I highly recommend that all citizens of the internet pick it up. I can't wait to turn some of my reflections into actions.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Boutté

    This is the first book I’ve read by Emma Gannon, and I became an instant fan of her writing. She has a great style of writing that’s very conversational, and I really enjoy that type of writing. As far as the subject matter goes, Gannon writes about something that I can relate to, which is being a millennial and growing up seeing the internet explode. She writes about how “disconnected” we are due to social media and technology, and gives a lot of practical and actionable advice for living a bet This is the first book I’ve read by Emma Gannon, and I became an instant fan of her writing. She has a great style of writing that’s very conversational, and I really enjoy that type of writing. As far as the subject matter goes, Gannon writes about something that I can relate to, which is being a millennial and growing up seeing the internet explode. She writes about how “disconnected” we are due to social media and technology, and gives a lot of practical and actionable advice for living a better life in the online age. Personally, I’ve read countless books about how social media has made us more disconnected than ever. So, there was a lot of information and research that I was well aware of. But, where this book stands out is Gannon’s nuanced approach to the topic. She doesn’t stand on some high ground saying that social media is the devil and we need to eliminate it. She recognizes the benefits but recommends we use it in moderation and recognize certain feelings that arise as a result of regularly using social media. If social media drives you nuts, makes you depressed, anxious, or afraid of being canceled this is a great book that you should check out. It’s fairly short, and you’ll most likely gain some value from it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Where is the line between your ability to control the technology in your life and the technology in your life controlling you? This is the question Gannon attempts to aid the reader in answering. More importantly, the author provides concrete strategies for taking back control and making technology a healthier-or at least less harmful- force in our lives. Plus, she does it without simply say, “Get rid of everything.” There is plenty of critique in this book, especially around the intersection bet Where is the line between your ability to control the technology in your life and the technology in your life controlling you? This is the question Gannon attempts to aid the reader in answering. More importantly, the author provides concrete strategies for taking back control and making technology a healthier-or at least less harmful- force in our lives. Plus, she does it without simply say, “Get rid of everything.” There is plenty of critique in this book, especially around the intersection between capitalism and technology and social media. However, Gannon also infuses the humane back into the conversation by emphasizing the need for grace, compassion, and self-care in our relationships with our devices and technological history. It was these pieces that made this book so compelling, inspiring me to integrate small strategies into my own use of technology, such as unsubscribing and unfollowing accounts that evoke harmful comparisons or the need for purchasing “cures” to make me thinner, prettier, happier, etc. It's a short read/listen that I was able to finish in just one evening, and it’s worth the time. In the end, it gave me the metaphorical space to realize how much I’m craving a more humane experience of my world outside of screens.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This was my first book by the author it was a wonderful read - I will definitely be seeking out her other books. I had fun browsing her website and just signed up for her newsletter, too. Thank you to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for making this available – what a great read! Dis-Connected by Emma Gannon is a quick listen (~2 hours) about how we navigate the digital world, in a practical way where we attempt to maintain real connections with others in both the real and digital worlds. This was my first book by the author it was a wonderful read - I will definitely be seeking out her other books. I had fun browsing her website and just signed up for her newsletter, too. Thank you to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for making this available – what a great read! Dis-Connected by Emma Gannon is a quick listen (~2 hours) about how we navigate the digital world, in a practical way where we attempt to maintain real connections with others in both the real and digital worlds. It’s like a gentle wake-up call (think those alarm clocks that gradually brighten) to check on your online habits, with practical and realistic prompts for how to maintain a balance in how you consume and participate in the land of digital. It’s not preachy nor does it ask you to overhaul your life. It’s asks you to hold a mirror up to yourself but doesn’t shame you for being a human in the digital age. It’s quite well done! Adding this to my list of favorite non-fiction books of 2022. Add this to your TBR for May 31 and in the meantime, check out her podcast or newsletter.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yamini

    The life is giving us signals that so many people are moving away from the larger social platforms to smaller groups- Disconnected was more of a program than just a book, where I enrolled myself to get a self check done. Best part was I was my own analyzer, there are guides and prompts in the program that help you do the analysis. On the outer part the book looks like more of a social media cleanser, but as you progress further you realize its a technique to differentiate & merge the real world The life is giving us signals that so many people are moving away from the larger social platforms to smaller groups- Disconnected was more of a program than just a book, where I enrolled myself to get a self check done. Best part was I was my own analyzer, there are guides and prompts in the program that help you do the analysis. On the outer part the book looks like more of a social media cleanser, but as you progress further you realize its a technique to differentiate & merge the real world with the reel world. Once done, you enroll out with a better vision of where you are currently, what changes you want to make and the things that you are currently doing - are they enhancing your life? Helping you become what you someday want to be! It's a brief read of 192 pages jampacked with actionable items. I read this over a period of 2 weeks & now atleast 2 portions are very clear to me: 1. What things I don't want to do anymore 2. What new things I would like to give a try instead Thankyou Netgalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for the ARC

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mechelle

    Listened to and highly recommend the audiobook version of Disconnected. Disconnected doesn't tell you to cut out social media but rather focuses on the importance of human contact and how it is affected by obsession with our online presence. It's fair to say there are many resources out there noting the negative effects of our time spent in the online world, but Emma Gannon gives some great tidbits and prompts to help the reader question and evaluate how social media really plays into our lives. Listened to and highly recommend the audiobook version of Disconnected. Disconnected doesn't tell you to cut out social media but rather focuses on the importance of human contact and how it is affected by obsession with our online presence. It's fair to say there are many resources out there noting the negative effects of our time spent in the online world, but Emma Gannon gives some great tidbits and prompts to help the reader question and evaluate how social media really plays into our lives. Gannon answers some of these questions for us without making the reader feel judged but instead understood - why do we care about our number of followers/likes? Because we as humans want to be seen. Why are debates more hostile than ever? Because we set up blinders online by choosing not to follow (aka "listen to") opposing opinions and therefore have a harder time engaging in these conversations in real life. I have to admit after listening to this audiobook, I did a Follower/Following profile clean-up with Gannon making the point that if you wouldn't interact with these people in a room or feel good looking at their content, why would you follow them? This book was short and sweet making it all the more consumable and possibly a more-than-once read. I recommend Disconnected for those looking to improve their relationship with social media!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy Nicole

    This book was part personal reflection and part self help. Emma reflects on how the pandemic has forced us all to embed our lives more in the online world. Work, social hour, and family connections have all had to become digital and they're all continuing to stay digital. The work expectation now is that people have a constant online presence and respond to emails almost instantly. Social media continues to encourage people to post things that are "like-worthy" and not always honest or real. All This book was part personal reflection and part self help. Emma reflects on how the pandemic has forced us all to embed our lives more in the online world. Work, social hour, and family connections have all had to become digital and they're all continuing to stay digital. The work expectation now is that people have a constant online presence and respond to emails almost instantly. Social media continues to encourage people to post things that are "like-worthy" and not always honest or real. All the things that are supposed to connect us with one another are really just disconnecting us. I loved that at the end of each chapter there were suggestions for how to disconnect in healthy ways. This book was definitely an eye opener and made me re-evaluate my own relationship with the online world. Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    It seems counterintuitive to the book’s message to be giving feedback on a book about disconnecting from social media and other people’s fake lives and opinions. But here we are. Disconnected by Emma Gannon contains relatable vignettes about growing up in the wake of new technology. Gannon offers advice your therapist would give you about not letting your perception of others control your life and influence your emotions. Alongside the advice, there’s space and time built in to reflect. Gannon o It seems counterintuitive to the book’s message to be giving feedback on a book about disconnecting from social media and other people’s fake lives and opinions. But here we are. Disconnected by Emma Gannon contains relatable vignettes about growing up in the wake of new technology. Gannon offers advice your therapist would give you about not letting your perception of others control your life and influence your emotions. Alongside the advice, there’s space and time built in to reflect. Gannon offers insightful prompts meant to make you evaluate your own role in overconsumption of media. In my opinion, more books need to include thought provoking questions related to the subject matter throughout the text. This is a short and sweet, one-sitting read earning 3.75/5 stars.

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