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Mother Noise

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A poignant and beautiful memoir told in essays and graphic shorts about what life looks like twenty years after recovery from addiction—and how to live with the past as a parent, writer, and sober person—from a regular opener for David Sedaris, Cindy House. Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nin A poignant and beautiful memoir told in essays and graphic shorts about what life looks like twenty years after recovery from addiction—and how to live with the past as a parent, writer, and sober person—from a regular opener for David Sedaris, Cindy House. Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nine-year-old son about her past. She wants him to learn this history from her, not anyone else; but she worries about the effect this truth may have on him. Told in essays and graphic narrative shorts, Mother Noise is a stunning memoir that delves deep into our responsibilities as parents while celebrating the moments of grace and generosity that mark a true friendship—in this case, her benefactor and champion through the years, David Sedaris. This is a powerful memoir about addiction, motherhood, and Cindy’s ongoing effort to reconcile the two. Are we required to share with our children the painful details of our past, or do we owe them protection from the harsh truth of who we were before? With dark humor and brutal, clear-eyed honesty, Mother Noise brilliantly captures and gorgeously renders our desire to look hopefully forward—while acknowledging the darkness of the past.


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A poignant and beautiful memoir told in essays and graphic shorts about what life looks like twenty years after recovery from addiction—and how to live with the past as a parent, writer, and sober person—from a regular opener for David Sedaris, Cindy House. Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nin A poignant and beautiful memoir told in essays and graphic shorts about what life looks like twenty years after recovery from addiction—and how to live with the past as a parent, writer, and sober person—from a regular opener for David Sedaris, Cindy House. Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nine-year-old son about her past. She wants him to learn this history from her, not anyone else; but she worries about the effect this truth may have on him. Told in essays and graphic narrative shorts, Mother Noise is a stunning memoir that delves deep into our responsibilities as parents while celebrating the moments of grace and generosity that mark a true friendship—in this case, her benefactor and champion through the years, David Sedaris. This is a powerful memoir about addiction, motherhood, and Cindy’s ongoing effort to reconcile the two. Are we required to share with our children the painful details of our past, or do we owe them protection from the harsh truth of who we were before? With dark humor and brutal, clear-eyed honesty, Mother Noise brilliantly captures and gorgeously renders our desire to look hopefully forward—while acknowledging the darkness of the past.

30 review for Mother Noise

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leah R

    I had been wanting to read "Mother Noise" for a long time, since I'd first heard about it many months ago. I received an advanced copy recently and opened it right away, in the middle of a busy morning, thinking I would start with the first couple of essays, and then get back to work. By mid afternoon however, I was still reading, having the kind of experience I’ve been craving but haven’t had in so, so long; complete transportation. I lost track of time, of where I was sitting, forgot that I wa I had been wanting to read "Mother Noise" for a long time, since I'd first heard about it many months ago. I received an advanced copy recently and opened it right away, in the middle of a busy morning, thinking I would start with the first couple of essays, and then get back to work. By mid afternoon however, I was still reading, having the kind of experience I’ve been craving but haven’t had in so, so long; complete transportation. I lost track of time, of where I was sitting, forgot that I was reading words. I have felt that way just a handful of times, while reading books that felt like sustenance, like life support. This is one of those books. "Mother Noise," goes right to the deepest, most painful, most vulnerable mothering places. But just as often it goes to the most glorious ones too. This book isn't just about parenting in the face of enormous obstacles however. It is also about the often brutal experience of being a person of tremendous sensitivity, in a world that doesn't easily make room for that. It is about being brought to your knees, over and over again, with no idea of how or if you will make it back up to standing. By sharing her unique experience in a these hyper honest, pared down, often devastating yet exquisite essays, we see how Cindy House manages it. Read this book. It is heart breaking. It will knock you out. It is gorgeous. It will lift you up, up, up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    A once student, and long-time friend of my beloved David Sedaris? Hell yes, I’m in! This memoir in essays covers House’s life post-addiction, openly discussing what it’s like living in recovery as a parent and writer. Of course, my favorite moments were about her close friendship with Sedaris. She often opens for him on tour. Sadly, of the three times I’ve seen him, she hasn’t been there. Maybe next time! Note: I listened on audio but it sounds like the print version has some graphic shorts wort A once student, and long-time friend of my beloved David Sedaris? Hell yes, I’m in! This memoir in essays covers House’s life post-addiction, openly discussing what it’s like living in recovery as a parent and writer. Of course, my favorite moments were about her close friendship with Sedaris. She often opens for him on tour. Sadly, of the three times I’ve seen him, she hasn’t been there. Maybe next time! Note: I listened on audio but it sounds like the print version has some graphic shorts worth checking out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    Spectacular, Cindy. I read it in one sitting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

    An excellent, engaging, sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes funny debut essay collection (with pictures!). I'm not a big essay reader, but I flew through this book, which tackles a big theme: Cindy House's many years of addiction. Although her heroin use ended some 20 years ago, the memory of her life as an addict affects how she thinks about every aspect of her life. This sounds like a really heavy group of stories, but somehow House's honest, clear prose makes some very harsh realities ingestab An excellent, engaging, sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes funny debut essay collection (with pictures!). I'm not a big essay reader, but I flew through this book, which tackles a big theme: Cindy House's many years of addiction. Although her heroin use ended some 20 years ago, the memory of her life as an addict affects how she thinks about every aspect of her life. This sounds like a really heavy group of stories, but somehow House's honest, clear prose makes some very harsh realities ingestable without diminishing the shame and pain she experienced. Although the memories of addiction are found throughout Mother Noise, it's also (as the title suggests) about motherhood and family — the joys and terrors of parenting, dealing with an unstable ex-husband, and getting to know your kid. And lest I forget, this book is also a little bit about David Sedaris, who it could be said is the reason this book exists. As a long-time friend of House's (dating back to when she was deep in her addiction) and an ardent supporter of her work, he appears in one of the best and most beautiful essays in the collection. Highly recommend this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allison Glasgow

    An open and intimate memoir told in short stories, essays & graphics. As a mother in recovery, I really appreciated this book! So many highlights and nuggets of wisdom on life, addiction, recovery and motherhood. Cindy House beautifully and bravely puts all of life's struggles on paper in an honest and moving perspective. This is why I love and will always read great books on overcoming addiction, struggling with motherhood or life in general - it makes you feel 'seen'; less alone. As she point An open and intimate memoir told in short stories, essays & graphics. As a mother in recovery, I really appreciated this book! So many highlights and nuggets of wisdom on life, addiction, recovery and motherhood. Cindy House beautifully and bravely puts all of life's struggles on paper in an honest and moving perspective. This is why I love and will always read great books on overcoming addiction, struggling with motherhood or life in general - it makes you feel 'seen'; less alone. As she point out- books can really save your life! Many thanks to Netgalley & Scribner / Marysue Rucci Books for my advanced copy!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chlo

    **Recieved an Advanced Reader copy from the bookstore where I work! Memoirs are really exempt from star ratings in my mind -- how can I rate someone else's life and stories? But as with all memoirs about mental health and personal struggles with family, I feel a special warmth and connection with the writer. House wrote a passage about how stories can show us that we are not alone, and she is absolutely right -- that's why I read, if I'm honest. To know that I, too, can survive the darkness and liv **Recieved an Advanced Reader copy from the bookstore where I work! Memoirs are really exempt from star ratings in my mind -- how can I rate someone else's life and stories? But as with all memoirs about mental health and personal struggles with family, I feel a special warmth and connection with the writer. House wrote a passage about how stories can show us that we are not alone, and she is absolutely right -- that's why I read, if I'm honest. To know that I, too, can survive the darkness and live to tell the tale, because others have done the same.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    "If you shake me, the past still rattles around inside. I close my eyes and an old zipper from a favorite pair of pants shivers over my skin. The weightlessness of a wooden hummingbird sits in my palm. Old letters twist and stretch themselves out of their envelopes like snakes shedding their skin, revealing loopy, girlish handwriting that says I want to live, please survive this." This past winter David Sedaris did a few readings in Seattle for his not-yet-released book Happy-Go-Lucky and he brou "If you shake me, the past still rattles around inside. I close my eyes and an old zipper from a favorite pair of pants shivers over my skin. The weightlessness of a wooden hummingbird sits in my palm. Old letters twist and stretch themselves out of their envelopes like snakes shedding their skin, revealing loopy, girlish handwriting that says I want to live, please survive this." This past winter David Sedaris did a few readings in Seattle for his not-yet-released book Happy-Go-Lucky and he brought his former student and lifelong friend Cindy House to read an excerpt from Mother Noise to open for him. Luckily for me this event series took place within walking distance of my humble abode, so I snagged tickets and meandered to the event. When the audience was told an unknown author would be opening for Sedaris, I was less than thrilled. Who is this House lady, I thought. Well, fortunately for me, when House started reading I was blown away. I jotted down her name and crossed my fingers hoping I could snag an ARC of her upcoming memoir. Fast forward to today, where not only was I luckily enough to acquire said ARC (thanks, NetGalley!) but I've devoured the book and will share my thoughts with you, dear reader. As my opening quote demonstrates, House has a beautifully poetic way with words. I simply adore the way she stitches together her thoughts and ideas to tell her story. And man, does House have an interesting story to tell. From her time in a psych ward due to severe depression to overcoming a heroin addiction to going through a custody battle with a truly awful ex, House has lived through some things. Additionally, a lovely little surprise I wasn't expecting was the comics dispersed throughout the story. Not only can House write, she can draw too! While I found this memoir to be thoroughly enjoyable, I also found a few things I wasn't the biggest fan of. The first one is probably a me problem, but I have a hard time when memoirists jump around in time when they're telling their life story - especially if it's someone whose story isn't well known to the public to begin with. Since House was in and out of college, in and out of rehab, on and off drugs, and has been married more than once, it was slightly difficult for me to correctly arrange her life story in my wee brain since her essays weren't arranged chronologically. The second gripe is how much of her book was about David Sedaris and her friendship with him. Look, I'm a huge Sedaris fan, so it was a thumbs up in my book that he made an appearance in this tale. And it's very clear he's been a long standing positive influence in House's life. I just felt House's story is so interesting on its own I would've liked to see more pages of this book devoted to how she managed to finally overcome addiction or anecdotes of her terrible ex husband and fewer pages of letters she received from David over the years.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abby Mars

    David Sedaris raved about this book and usually brings the author on tour to open for him. She wasn’t at the reading we attended unfortunately - but I’m so glad I picked up the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    BookStarRaven

    Quick Take: A mother struggles with parenting after a life of addiction. Mother Noise by Cindy House is part memoir, part musing about what it means to parent through trauma. House always felt big, even as a child her emotions were powerful. Unfortunately, she was taught not to let them out and to suppress them. In time this took its toll and she felt like she was drowning in her own emotions. As she transitioned into adulthood, she found alcohol and pot could sooth the pain which eventually tran Quick Take: A mother struggles with parenting after a life of addiction. Mother Noise by Cindy House is part memoir, part musing about what it means to parent through trauma. House always felt big, even as a child her emotions were powerful. Unfortunately, she was taught not to let them out and to suppress them. In time this took its toll and she felt like she was drowning in her own emotions. As she transitioned into adulthood, she found alcohol and pot could sooth the pain which eventually transitioned into harder drugs like heroine. Even though I’ve never struggled with drug addiction, I empathized so much with House in this story. Her writing made me feel like I was living through the pain with her. While this sounds unpleasant, it is one of the greatest joys of reading - to experience life with others. She eventually got married and had her first child, leaving drugs behind. Unfortunately, her marriage was abusive and ended in divorce. Parenting is hard, parenting while sharing custody with an abusive parent is even harder. Her ex-husband remarried as soon as they got divorced. His new wife was very abusive to her stepson, purposely feeding him things he was allergic to prove he wasn’t allergic. I really saw how messed up our child custody system is House does an excellent job drawing you into her story and I appreciated her vulnerability. At times, her story did feel a little disjointed, but I assume it was by design. I would recommend this book to anyone who this story resonates with or likes memoirs. Rating: 4/5 Genre: Memoir

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    An outstanding essay collection. Cindy House writes with so much heart, clarity, and humor about her addiction, her relationship with David Sedaris (spanning three decades!), and reconciling her troubled past with her present, as a sober mother, writer, and artist. House's prose is smooth as marble and warmly invites the reader into her world. Every essay here is unforgettable and filled with so much genuine emotion and unique, complex insight. My favorite pieces include "We Waitresses," "Heartw An outstanding essay collection. Cindy House writes with so much heart, clarity, and humor about her addiction, her relationship with David Sedaris (spanning three decades!), and reconciling her troubled past with her present, as a sober mother, writer, and artist. House's prose is smooth as marble and warmly invites the reader into her world. Every essay here is unforgettable and filled with so much genuine emotion and unique, complex insight. My favorite pieces include "We Waitresses," "Heartworks," and "I'm Here To See David Sedaris." "I Went From Phoenix, Arizona" is one of the most devastating yet sincere and loving explorations of the mental health crisis in America. Sedaris, on his cover blurb, says of House, "This is her time." I couldn't agree more.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tavi Black

    Cindy House’s essays cut to the heart of being human: the joy, the difficulty and the pain. Her honest, wonderfully crafted essays will make the reader pause and consider their own relationship to their past. The most valuable aspect of this entertaining work, for me, is House’s effort to unearth shame—to bring it to light and examine burdens she has carried. This book does the heroic work that I look for in memoir—it entertains, teaches, and connects. And with House’s considerable drawing skill Cindy House’s essays cut to the heart of being human: the joy, the difficulty and the pain. Her honest, wonderfully crafted essays will make the reader pause and consider their own relationship to their past. The most valuable aspect of this entertaining work, for me, is House’s effort to unearth shame—to bring it to light and examine burdens she has carried. This book does the heroic work that I look for in memoir—it entertains, teaches, and connects. And with House’s considerable drawing skills, there is a second layer of communication through her graphics in a work that is expertly structured. I was kindly gifted an ARC for a podcast episode where we discussed Cindy’s work. I was not asked to review her work but chose to do so as I felt very connected to the piece.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Speier

    I loved this collection of essays/stories. This lucky woman studied under David Sedaris, of whom I am more a fan for the support he continues to give her as a former teacher. This book is beautiful, sad, and heartwarming all at once.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    The writing is wonderful; the story is real. Cindy House opens up about her life through essays that can be described as clever, refreshing, and seemingly effortless. Her memoir is not only a story of addiction and recovery, it's a story of motherhood, family, regret, loss, and determination. While reading, I felt truly invested in her story; every misstep, various trips to rehab, interactions with her son, each and every personal thought that she so generously shares...Her writing is unlike any The writing is wonderful; the story is real. Cindy House opens up about her life through essays that can be described as clever, refreshing, and seemingly effortless. Her memoir is not only a story of addiction and recovery, it's a story of motherhood, family, regret, loss, and determination. While reading, I felt truly invested in her story; every misstep, various trips to rehab, interactions with her son, each and every personal thought that she so generously shares...Her writing is unlike anything I've read. And, I find that her reflections are quite relatable. I believe that everyone who reads this unique memoir will find morsels that apply to them, specifically. I absolutely loved reading this book and am sure that I will read it again!

  14. 5 out of 5

    ShaunC

    In Mother Noise, I think that Cindy House does well something that is hard to do: to look back upon a difficult past with an inquisitive kindness and understanding. All while working through important questions about the meaning of that past to the current day and beyond. I read a lot for work and therefore often find that I have limited bandwidth for non-essential reading. Recommended by friends, Mother Noise held my attention closely enough for me to finish the book in a few days.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Obsesses over Books & Cookies

    A book of essays written by a woman who suffered addiction and relapses and has been clean for 20+ years. I love essays by recovering addicts. They are so self aware of their weaknesses and flaws and it's refreshing. We all have our stuff. We are all helpless at certain point. But Cindy is also a mother so it's about being a parent and dealing with bringing up your child in the face of the scary terrible but also joyous world. She also is a student of and is friends with David Sedaris so there's A book of essays written by a woman who suffered addiction and relapses and has been clean for 20+ years. I love essays by recovering addicts. They are so self aware of their weaknesses and flaws and it's refreshing. We all have our stuff. We are all helpless at certain point. But Cindy is also a mother so it's about being a parent and dealing with bringing up your child in the face of the scary terrible but also joyous world. She also is a student of and is friends with David Sedaris so there's a bit about him too which if you're a fan you'll like this. I appreciated the humor here and there and the candid details of struggling.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Franklin

    If I could give this book 6 stars, I would. Heartfelt, vulnerable, funny, self-aware, & captivating. Meant to read the first paragraph to see if it was worth picking up & read the entire first essay in what felt like one breath. Cant recommend enough.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    I saw that she was an opener for David Sedaris and that's all the endorsement I need I saw that she was an opener for David Sedaris and that's all the endorsement I need

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    To me, Mother Noise is an exquisitely written meditation on some important topics: motherhood, addiction, emotional awareness and sensitivity, resiliency, friendship, compassion. Throughout this memoir, I was moved by the author’s skillfulness in describing psychological interiors in ways that felt so authentic they took my breath away. Frequently at the edge of my seat, I was anxious to keep apace with the evolving narrative. To be sure, this is not an action/adventure novel. However, for me, b To me, Mother Noise is an exquisitely written meditation on some important topics: motherhood, addiction, emotional awareness and sensitivity, resiliency, friendship, compassion. Throughout this memoir, I was moved by the author’s skillfulness in describing psychological interiors in ways that felt so authentic they took my breath away. Frequently at the edge of my seat, I was anxious to keep apace with the evolving narrative. To be sure, this is not an action/adventure novel. However, for me, being along for the ride with this internal, psychological journey was far more captivating. I am grateful to have been swept up in Cindy House’s Mother Noise. To witness the sorrows that brought her to hard-won joys. To understand the particular kinds of devastation that addiction and depression ushered in. And to feel awe and admiration in her overcoming these difficult challenges. All of this, through the eyes, and heart, and brilliant mind, of a woman who has stitched for us a compelling word quilt of her life’s experiences. And in so doing she has set an example. Showing us that we may garner this type of courage in our own spaces, to face what’s true, and work as diligently to heal our lives.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Thank you #Netgalley for the advanced copy! I loved the flow of this memoir, short stories/essays as Cindy recalls her years of addiction, rehab and now as a adult of a young teenage son. She shares her honest feelings of how/when to tell her son her past, who to tell her story to so no one judges her. We read as she develops friendships, goes to different rehabs/therapies, visits her old stomping grounds, etc. We also learn about her son and how he processes his feelings and how she worries abou Thank you #Netgalley for the advanced copy! I loved the flow of this memoir, short stories/essays as Cindy recalls her years of addiction, rehab and now as a adult of a young teenage son. She shares her honest feelings of how/when to tell her son her past, who to tell her story to so no one judges her. We read as she develops friendships, goes to different rehabs/therapies, visits her old stomping grounds, etc. We also learn about her son and how he processes his feelings and how she worries about his future and if her struggles are genetic,. A very honest easy read on a hard topic.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Sanchez

    this book tore me apart… i identified with all the parenting struggles. i can’t speak on addiction but this book was more than addiction. it’s about showing our kids the vulnerability of being humans. growing up i always thought my parents knew everything and could do no wrong. now as a parent myself i know that’s not the case. there was a short story in the book that talked about david sedaris. I could do without that narrative but, i also understand that he was a big part of her life and i see this book tore me apart… i identified with all the parenting struggles. i can’t speak on addiction but this book was more than addiction. it’s about showing our kids the vulnerability of being humans. growing up i always thought my parents knew everything and could do no wrong. now as a parent myself i know that’s not the case. there was a short story in the book that talked about david sedaris. I could do without that narrative but, i also understand that he was a big part of her life and i see why she included it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    I wasn't at all familiar with Cindy House before reading this memoir. The sections about her son-- particularly the complexity of raising a copy-paste of your own complex biology while also grappling with how to let him in on exactly what that means-- was moving and fascinating. The actual addiction/recovery portion of the story was less intriguing to me, but perhaps the point was to keep us somewhat separate from that part of House's life. I wasn't at all familiar with Cindy House before reading this memoir. The sections about her son-- particularly the complexity of raising a copy-paste of your own complex biology while also grappling with how to let him in on exactly what that means-- was moving and fascinating. The actual addiction/recovery portion of the story was less intriguing to me, but perhaps the point was to keep us somewhat separate from that part of House's life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauryn Hewett

    I never write reviews, but I’ll start here because I saw Cindy on tour with David Sedaris and she said she checks Goodreads. I thought this was was brilliant. Her narratives are woven together to create a novel that showcases the great pain and triumphant healing that are all possible within the human experience. As a mother I felt seen and connected deeply with the vulnerability she describes with candor. Looking forward to reading more from her.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    I brought this book with me on vacation and swallowed it whole within two days. I had heard Cindy read one of her pieces aloud at the last Sedaris show I went to a couple of months ago. I instantly pre-ordered a digital copy of her book but took it out from the library anyway because I'm terrible with remembering I have digital copies of anything. Her essays are just as good as Sedaris', arguably even better since I can wholeheartedly relate as a struggling mother myself. This is good stuff. I brought this book with me on vacation and swallowed it whole within two days. I had heard Cindy read one of her pieces aloud at the last Sedaris show I went to a couple of months ago. I instantly pre-ordered a digital copy of her book but took it out from the library anyway because I'm terrible with remembering I have digital copies of anything. Her essays are just as good as Sedaris', arguably even better since I can wholeheartedly relate as a struggling mother myself. This is good stuff.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Cindy House's memoir 'Mother Noise' is a fascinating story of a former heroin addict who enters recovery and a new life. This new life makes her feel like her past remains a shameful secret, a secret able to topple her son's trusting adoration, and her fellow moms' friendship. This insider's look at recovery, motherhood, insecurity and hope make for a riveting read. Cindy House's memoir 'Mother Noise' is a fascinating story of a former heroin addict who enters recovery and a new life. This new life makes her feel like her past remains a shameful secret, a secret able to topple her son's trusting adoration, and her fellow moms' friendship. This insider's look at recovery, motherhood, insecurity and hope make for a riveting read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Weinberg

    Highly recommend. In this heart felt and sometimes wrenching memoir I felt so connected to the author in her essays about her life through and out of addiction into sober motherhood. Her writing was incredible- touching prose sprinkled with humor. A great book. Thanks to Netgalley for and eARC copy of this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (The Book Club Mom)

    I absolutely loved the format of this memoir. It’s a great mix of essays and graphic shorts with content that is just as impressive. Cindy House discusses her experiences with motherhood, drug addiction, divorce, custody battles, and starting over. Her story is equal parts inspiring and heartbreaking. Highly recommend!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leona

    This raw memoir about addiction and motherhood was easily read in one day. Honest, humorous, and heart breaking at times. I can’t imagine the ravages of addiction but can definitely relate to the consuming love for a child. Sharing this human experience is a testament to our ability to get better and be better. I recommend this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    I am so deeply moved by these essays - both individually and their collective impact. House beautifully conveys sentiments and memories (simultaneously murky and sharp) with her authentic voice and unique tempo of storytelling and reflection. I borrowed this book from the library (per usual); I look forward to purchasing a copy to keep in addition to one to share with friends.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alex Nye

    I was fortunate to learn of Cindy House after seeing her open for David Sedaris in Chicago. I was so moved by her reading that I immediately bought her book. This collection of essays are funny, soul baring, and full of hope.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Libbye

    Received as a giveaway, I appreciated reading about a life different than my own. I think it would be best for those specifically looking for books about motherhood.

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