Hot Best Seller

The Last Beekeeper

Availability: Ready to download

Award-winning author Pablo Cartaya’s latest middle grade, The Last Beekeeper, follows twelve-year-old Yolanda Cicerón as she fights to the save the last known beehive in the world from extinction against nearly insurmountable obstacles—an environment completely changed by climate change and the greedy humans who will profit from the bees. In a future shaken by climate disas Award-winning author Pablo Cartaya’s latest middle grade, The Last Beekeeper, follows twelve-year-old Yolanda Cicerón as she fights to the save the last known beehive in the world from extinction against nearly insurmountable obstacles—an environment completely changed by climate change and the greedy humans who will profit from the bees. In a future shaken by climate disasters, Yolanda Cicerón knows that nature is something to be feared. From the crops that don’t grow to the terrifying creatures that roam the countryside, Yoly’s life in the Valley is brutal and harsh. She dreams of leaving her farm to live in Silo—the most advanced town for miles around. But first, Yoly will need to prove she belongs in a place where only the smartest and most useful are welcomed. Between her razor-sharp smarts and sheer determination, Yoly is well on her way to leaving her farm life when she discovers her family can no longer afford her schooling. Desperate for a solution, Yoly is forced to take matters into her own hands, but the closer she gets to securing her future, the more she uncovers the dangers lying inside Silo’s walls—ones that threaten the entire Valley. As she cracks long guarded secrets, Yoly along with those closest to her are put in grave peril and the only chance of surviving may lie in the rediscovery of a long extinct species—the honeybee. Can the last surviving beehive be the key to pulling the Valley out from under Silo’s thumb, or will they destroy what remains of Yoly’s future? The Last Beekeeper is a gripping adventure story about fighting to right the wrongs of past generations while finding hope in the present by award-winning author Pablo Cartaya.


Compare

Award-winning author Pablo Cartaya’s latest middle grade, The Last Beekeeper, follows twelve-year-old Yolanda Cicerón as she fights to the save the last known beehive in the world from extinction against nearly insurmountable obstacles—an environment completely changed by climate change and the greedy humans who will profit from the bees. In a future shaken by climate disas Award-winning author Pablo Cartaya’s latest middle grade, The Last Beekeeper, follows twelve-year-old Yolanda Cicerón as she fights to the save the last known beehive in the world from extinction against nearly insurmountable obstacles—an environment completely changed by climate change and the greedy humans who will profit from the bees. In a future shaken by climate disasters, Yolanda Cicerón knows that nature is something to be feared. From the crops that don’t grow to the terrifying creatures that roam the countryside, Yoly’s life in the Valley is brutal and harsh. She dreams of leaving her farm to live in Silo—the most advanced town for miles around. But first, Yoly will need to prove she belongs in a place where only the smartest and most useful are welcomed. Between her razor-sharp smarts and sheer determination, Yoly is well on her way to leaving her farm life when she discovers her family can no longer afford her schooling. Desperate for a solution, Yoly is forced to take matters into her own hands, but the closer she gets to securing her future, the more she uncovers the dangers lying inside Silo’s walls—ones that threaten the entire Valley. As she cracks long guarded secrets, Yoly along with those closest to her are put in grave peril and the only chance of surviving may lie in the rediscovery of a long extinct species—the honeybee. Can the last surviving beehive be the key to pulling the Valley out from under Silo’s thumb, or will they destroy what remains of Yoly’s future? The Last Beekeeper is a gripping adventure story about fighting to right the wrongs of past generations while finding hope in the present by award-winning author Pablo Cartaya.

30 review for The Last Beekeeper

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ayman Fadel

    I read an Advanced Reader Copy sent to me by the author. In a future where the environment has changed beyond recognition, survivors of the ecological collapse inhabit a valley with a city in which a technological renaissance has reestablished some of the computer based-communications and robotics of the 21st century, but only through extraction of the labor of the other inhabitants of the valley. Yolanda, the protagonist, aspires to a position among the elite of the city. As she learns more about I read an Advanced Reader Copy sent to me by the author. In a future where the environment has changed beyond recognition, survivors of the ecological collapse inhabit a valley with a city in which a technological renaissance has reestablished some of the computer based-communications and robotics of the 21st century, but only through extraction of the labor of the other inhabitants of the valley. Yolanda, the protagonist, aspires to a position among the elite of the city. As she learns more about how the city exploits the inhabitants of the valley and how her parents and grandmother resisted the people ruling the city, she changes into a fighter for her people's liberation. In particular, liberation requires equality in distribution of electricity, information and bees, which have disappeared from the environment and whose absence has resulted in a stunted agricultural sector. Yolanda learns that her grandmother and parents have laid the groundwork for restoration of bees into the environment, but it will take sacrifice and bravery from the people of the valley to overthrow the political authorities benefiting from the imposed poverty of the inhabitants of the valley outside of the city. This is a Young Adult novel which reminded me of Philip Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" and William Gibson's "Neuromancer," with a story line which illustrates political economy's discussions of imperialism and the relations between the metropole and periphery. Young adult readers will probably just enjoy the imaginative future and the thrilling action!

  2. 4 out of 5

    S.R. Toliver

    This was such an enjoyable read, and it does all the things I want dystopian books to do: make us think, call us out, prepare us to be better. The MCs are lovable and the author takes great effort to make sure all of their actions are explained in ways that make sense. Even if I hate something a character does, there’s enough backstory for me to be like, “if I went through that, I’d do the same thing.”It’s a small thing, but that’s something that really matters to me. I also really like the tech This was such an enjoyable read, and it does all the things I want dystopian books to do: make us think, call us out, prepare us to be better. The MCs are lovable and the author takes great effort to make sure all of their actions are explained in ways that make sense. Even if I hate something a character does, there’s enough backstory for me to be like, “if I went through that, I’d do the same thing.”It’s a small thing, but that’s something that really matters to me. I also really like the tech system. It was intricate, but not so convoluted that I couldn’t understand what was happening or how the world works. For a book that’s less than 300 pages and one housed in the scifi genre, that’s really hard to do. The last thing is that the book is less than 300 pages. So many YA/MG books are in the mid 350-500 range, and although I still read and enjoy those, sometimes I just want a book I can read in a day without losing the entire day (even if the story is good). So, kudos to this amazing author for writing a brilliant story filled with love, heart, and adventure. I really enjoyed it, and I know so many young people will appreciate Yoly’s journey.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    I’m really looking forward to sharing this with students. I think they’ll love the mix of sci-fi, adventure and climate change impacts. I especially appreciated the way the story incorporates aspects of farming within an exciting story. In some ways the final confrontation didn’t flow as smoothly as the rest of the story, but I want to see what kids think. My guess is that they’ll love the characters and the culminating action. Recommend for grades 4-7.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC provided by Young Adult Books Central Yolanda lives with her older sister Cami on the family finca in a much altered future world. Climate change has caused cataclysmic problems, and much of the world is uninhabitable. The girls' parents were taken away from the government, which is horrifically intrusive. Everyone must carry a V-Probe, and if it is not online, there are sanctions. At one point, the much older Cami was sent on Retreat, which is part social service and part punishment, and ret ARC provided by Young Adult Books Central Yolanda lives with her older sister Cami on the family finca in a much altered future world. Climate change has caused cataclysmic problems, and much of the world is uninhabitable. The girls' parents were taken away from the government, which is horrifically intrusive. Everyone must carry a V-Probe, and if it is not online, there are sanctions. At one point, the much older Cami was sent on Retreat, which is part social service and part punishment, and returned with a badly damaged hand that had to be robotically augmented. This experience is something that she never shares with Yolanda, and the two rarely discuss their parents, the government, or even the sire straits that there farm is in. They grow strawberries, and have to pay for robotis drones to pollinate them, but the fruit is still hard and unripe, making it difficult to sell for much of a profit. Yolanda really wants to take a virtual class in Advanced Neurolink, hoping to become a doctor who can install these high tech devices and to have a better standard of living. The mayor of the nearby town, Blackburn, offers Yolanda a scholarship when she finds out Cami can't afford the class. Cami warns her that she should not accept, but Yolanda goes behind her sister's back. Later, she finds out that the cost of her education will be going on Retreat herself. Yolanda has a friend, Arelis, but the two usually only connect online. Arelis' brother is having trouble, but it's hard to find out exactly what is going on without the government finding out. When Yolanda is curious about her abuelita and Cami won't tell her much, she does some digging and finds a book that her grandmother wrote about the bee population. All signs point to a hidden hive that could pollinate the strawberry plants, and also provide the girls with honey that they could see at a high price. One of the people willing to pay for this rare commodity is Hortensia Blackburn, the sister of the mayor. Dealing with the bees is dangerous on a number of levels. Will Yolanda be able to work with them in order to save her family and friends from the unlikely source of the serious threats? Yolanda is a great character who wants to become educated as a way to get away from the grueling life of farming in a world badly damaged by climate change and strife. Her professor and fellow students try to sabotage her at every turn, but she is dedicated to learning more about technology so that she can help others, as well as herself. Cami's reticence is understandable, given the trauma in her past, but she eventually learns to communicate with her sister. The Blackburns are clearly villians in the most classic sense, but the Mayor is delightfully oily and seemingly nice, which always makes for a much scarier villian, in my opinion! There are a growing number of middle grade science fiction books that center climate change, but even Bachorz's 2011 Drought talked about some of this! I have certainly been aware of the problems with bees ever since reading Burns' The Hive Detectives in 2012! This is a growing concern for children, and I have to say that the idea of drone pollinators made me feel a teeny bit better, although I will still keep my bee garden! I loved that Yolanda's gradnmother had been a scientist. This is definitely a dystopian book, but one that is less concerned with the world and more concerned with how the characters are reacting to it in order to make circumstances better. For some reason, this reminded me strongly of Perry's The Scavengers (2014), and had some tones of Burt's Cleo Porter and the Body Electric (2020). We're seeing more and more books addressing the future if critical issues aren't addressed, like Welford's prescient The Dog Who Saved the World (2021) and Rosenberg's environmentally themed One Small Hop (2021). Since the end of The Last Beekeeper contains a surprise twist with one of the characters, I think we may look forward to a sequel to this one!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carli

    Thank you, @librofm and @harpercollins, for the advance listening copy of this 7.12.22 release. All opinions are my own. • ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this dystopian tale. Twelve-year-old Yolanda and her sister live in a time where the environment as we know it is completely changed, outside of a town looking to track and control everything people do through technology. When Yolanda thinks she has received a no strings attached scholarship, she learns that she will owe more than money or a job to the mayor. Thank you, @librofm and @harpercollins, for the advance listening copy of this 7.12.22 release. All opinions are my own. • ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this dystopian tale. Twelve-year-old Yolanda and her sister live in a time where the environment as we know it is completely changed, outside of a town looking to track and control everything people do through technology. When Yolanda thinks she has received a no strings attached scholarship, she learns that she will owe more than money or a job to the mayor. In an effort to escape, she and her sister follow their grandmother’s old notes to honeybees, which may be their ticket to taking down the corrupt leadership in Silo. I enjoyed this as an audiobook - it kept me engaged and I am excited to book talk this one in August. Recommended for grades 5-8.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Cartaya

    What an incredible book! This is a book that makes you think, makes you cry, makes you laugh and makes you cheer. As an educator, I will be using this book with my students! Bravo Mr. Cartaya!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    Thank you to HarperCollins Children’s Books and #NetGalley for letting me read a digital ARC of The Last Beekeeper by Pablo Cartaya. This is my 99th book of 2022 and my 9th book of the summer. This book will be released on July 11, 2022. All opinions are my own. Yolanda “Yoly” Cicerón lives in a world that has been altered by climate change and those who profit from it. Her parents were exiled when she was young, and she’s lived with her older sister ever since. Yoly focuses on her education and Thank you to HarperCollins Children’s Books and #NetGalley for letting me read a digital ARC of The Last Beekeeper by Pablo Cartaya. This is my 99th book of 2022 and my 9th book of the summer. This book will be released on July 11, 2022. All opinions are my own. Yolanda “Yoly” Cicerón lives in a world that has been altered by climate change and those who profit from it. Her parents were exiled when she was young, and she’s lived with her older sister ever since. Yoly focuses on her education and wants to become a neurolink surgeon. Their family farm, though, is failing and they can’t afford her latest class. When the mayor offers her a scholarship, Yoly ignores her sister’s warnings and accepts without her consent and without reading the fine print. Yoly soon realizes that all actions have consequences and not everything is as it seems. This book covers some powerful themes related to power, climate change, technology, family, and standing up for what you believe in. It has several strong female characters. The concept was interesting and the dystopian world was believable (almost scarily so). That being said, I had trouble getting into the story and felt it didn’t flow as well as it could have.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Librarylady

    Yoli lives in the valley, but wants nothing more than to become part of the ultra tech community in nearby Silo. She wants it so much that she signs an agreement for a scholarship offered by the mayor when her family can't pay for her schooling. Yoli soon finds out that all is not what it seems with the mayor and Silo. While appearing to be kind and benevolent, the government is actually oppressing the people of the valley and using them for their own gain. With the help of her sister, her frien Yoli lives in the valley, but wants nothing more than to become part of the ultra tech community in nearby Silo. She wants it so much that she signs an agreement for a scholarship offered by the mayor when her family can't pay for her schooling. Yoli soon finds out that all is not what it seems with the mayor and Silo. While appearing to be kind and benevolent, the government is actually oppressing the people of the valley and using them for their own gain. With the help of her sister, her friends, and her community, she begins to fight back for a better life for everyone. Readers will root for this underdog and her friends as they help others discover the strength they have in family, friends, neighbors, and community.

  9. 5 out of 5

    K TEA

    In a future shaken by climate disasters, Yolanda Cicerón knows that nature is something to be feared. While life in the Valley is brutal and harsh, Yoly dreams of leaving her farm to live in Silo—the most advanced town for miles around. But first, Yoly will need to prove she belongs in a place where only the smartest and most useful are welcomed. So it's a middle grades book and I think it's very age appropriate but I also enjoyed it. Great for opening up discussions on the theme of the story wit In a future shaken by climate disasters, Yolanda Cicerón knows that nature is something to be feared. While life in the Valley is brutal and harsh, Yoly dreams of leaving her farm to live in Silo—the most advanced town for miles around. But first, Yoly will need to prove she belongs in a place where only the smartest and most useful are welcomed. So it's a middle grades book and I think it's very age appropriate but I also enjoyed it. Great for opening up discussions on the theme of the story with younger readers as well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    michelle

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a digitally galley. All opinions are my own. An interesting story, but it took longer than expected to pick up. Somewhat of a dystopia/science fiction novel looking at the downfalls of technology, big brother, and not taking care of nature or all citizens. I struggled with the pacing and the bizarre interspersing of Spanish in the text. Nature lovers and environmentalists will enjoy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joy Davenport

    Dystopian, set in a time when society has been rebuilt from the dregs of a previous time. 12 yo protagonist who acts older than she is - I thought she was 15 or 16. Community rallying for a cause… ecological awareness, good info on bees. Diverse (Hispanic, Asian, from last name, accent, language spoken) characters throughout, Pro- and antagonists. No content warnings. Not a super-dark dystopia. Rating: g+ some danger, adventure Recommend: 5th - 9th or so.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I wanted to get behind the book but it started off so awkwardly that I didn't get in to the flow and it being a story of the conservation (and importance) of bees as she is the last beekeeper, it's science fiction twist pulls it off the rails enough that I wasn't invested. I wanted to get behind the book but it started off so awkwardly that I didn't get in to the flow and it being a story of the conservation (and importance) of bees as she is the last beekeeper, it's science fiction twist pulls it off the rails enough that I wasn't invested.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maya Norton

    A stunning and worthy read. Grateful to have found it. Companion Reads: - "The Fifth Sacred Thing" and its sequel, "City of Refuge" by Starhawk (adults only) - "Our House Is on Fire: Scenes of a Family and a Planet in Crisis" by Malena Ernman, Greta Thunberg, Svante Thunberg, Beata Ernman A stunning and worthy read. Grateful to have found it. Companion Reads: - "The Fifth Sacred Thing" and its sequel, "City of Refuge" by Starhawk (adults only) - "Our House Is on Fire: Scenes of a Family and a Planet in Crisis" by Malena Ernman, Greta Thunberg, Svante Thunberg, Beata Ernman

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jgramley

    Such an incredible story about family, sticking up for what is right, community, and love for our planet. Yoly is beyond brave and as awareness came her life path altered. Definitely looking forward to the sequel which must happen and maybe developing more of a fondness for bees.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Kimmal

    I loved this book. Great sci-fi dystopian novel for middle grade. Can’t wait to share with kids.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dara Yoder

    Loved this audio book via Libro.fm! It made me, as an adult, stop and think! That's a great thing for a book to do! Enjoyed it a lot! #bookposse Loved this audio book via Libro.fm! It made me, as an adult, stop and think! That's a great thing for a book to do! Enjoyed it a lot! #bookposse

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mari Bianco

    This is a must read for fans of Pablo Cartaya. It may be his best book yet!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Whelan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elmarie Potgieter

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julianne

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie Frank

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Mitchell

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pam Joachim

  24. 4 out of 5

    jo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessennia Hernandez

  26. 4 out of 5

    Harmony

  27. 4 out of 5

    Corian Clark

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angel Mouser

  29. 5 out of 5

    Megan Brotemarkle

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ritter

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...