Hot Best Seller

My Life: Growing Up Asian in America

Availability: Ready to download

A collection of thirty heartfelt, witty, and hopeful thought pieces on the experience of growing up Asian American, for fans of Minor Feelings. There are 23 million people, representing more than twenty countries, each with unique languages, histories, and cultures, clumped under one banner: Asian American. Though their experiences are individual, certain commonalities app A collection of thirty heartfelt, witty, and hopeful thought pieces on the experience of growing up Asian American, for fans of Minor Feelings. There are 23 million people, representing more than twenty countries, each with unique languages, histories, and cultures, clumped under one banner: Asian American. Though their experiences are individual, certain commonalities appear. -The pressure to perform and the weight of the model minority myth. -The proximity to whiteness (for many) and the resulting privileges. -The desexualizing, exoticizing, and fetishizing of their bodies. -The microaggressions. -The erasure and overt racism. Through a series of essays, poems, and comics, thirty creators give voice to moments that defined them and shed light on the immense diversity and complexity of the Asian American identity. Edited by CAPE and with an introduction by renowned journalist SuChin Pak, My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is a celebration of community, a call to action, and a road map for a brighter future. Featuring contributions from bestselling authors Melissa de la Cruz, Marie Lu, and Tanaïs; journalists Amna Nawaz, Edmund Lee, and Aisha Sultan; TV and film writers Teresa Hsiao, Heather Jeng Bladt, and Nathan Ramos-Park; and industry leaders Ellen K. Pao and Aneesh Raman, among many more.


Compare

A collection of thirty heartfelt, witty, and hopeful thought pieces on the experience of growing up Asian American, for fans of Minor Feelings. There are 23 million people, representing more than twenty countries, each with unique languages, histories, and cultures, clumped under one banner: Asian American. Though their experiences are individual, certain commonalities app A collection of thirty heartfelt, witty, and hopeful thought pieces on the experience of growing up Asian American, for fans of Minor Feelings. There are 23 million people, representing more than twenty countries, each with unique languages, histories, and cultures, clumped under one banner: Asian American. Though their experiences are individual, certain commonalities appear. -The pressure to perform and the weight of the model minority myth. -The proximity to whiteness (for many) and the resulting privileges. -The desexualizing, exoticizing, and fetishizing of their bodies. -The microaggressions. -The erasure and overt racism. Through a series of essays, poems, and comics, thirty creators give voice to moments that defined them and shed light on the immense diversity and complexity of the Asian American identity. Edited by CAPE and with an introduction by renowned journalist SuChin Pak, My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is a celebration of community, a call to action, and a road map for a brighter future. Featuring contributions from bestselling authors Melissa de la Cruz, Marie Lu, and Tanaïs; journalists Amna Nawaz, Edmund Lee, and Aisha Sultan; TV and film writers Teresa Hsiao, Heather Jeng Bladt, and Nathan Ramos-Park; and industry leaders Ellen K. Pao and Aneesh Raman, among many more.

30 review for My Life: Growing Up Asian in America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kate Love

    Thank you for the ARC copy of this book~ I thoroughly enjoyed it! It only took me a few days to read it but like all books I've enjoyed, I didn't want it to end! Heh. I'm what some people call a mutt. I'm English, welsh, Irish on both sides, Dutch (possibly), Cherokee Indian, etc. I felt included for once. I felt validated and loved~ I thank the creator of this book~ it wasn't usually my genre but I've been slowly branching out and trying to read more than just my favorites~ so, I hope everyone Thank you for the ARC copy of this book~ I thoroughly enjoyed it! It only took me a few days to read it but like all books I've enjoyed, I didn't want it to end! Heh. I'm what some people call a mutt. I'm English, welsh, Irish on both sides, Dutch (possibly), Cherokee Indian, etc. I felt included for once. I felt validated and loved~ I thank the creator of this book~ it wasn't usually my genre but I've been slowly branching out and trying to read more than just my favorites~ so, I hope everyone has a chance to read this book when it comes out!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lynda Coker

    #goodreadsgiveaway This book is well written, edited, and arranged. The many different stories from multiple authors kept the reading fresh and the changing perspectives offered a deeper view of the book's overall theme. Let me say one thing that bears saying from my standpoint. Prejudice and mistreatment happens to most people everywhere any time that they are the (different) person in a crowd or situation. It's a simple fact that humans can't seem to deal maturely and kindly with things that ar #goodreadsgiveaway This book is well written, edited, and arranged. The many different stories from multiple authors kept the reading fresh and the changing perspectives offered a deeper view of the book's overall theme. Let me say one thing that bears saying from my standpoint. Prejudice and mistreatment happens to most people everywhere any time that they are the (different) person in a crowd or situation. It's a simple fact that humans can't seem to deal maturely and kindly with things that are different. At other times, they respond to people who are different in a less than gracious manner because they're intrigued and curious about them. My Life: Growing Up Asian in America has a lot to say about being different in nationality and the negative, rude, and prejudicial treatment that caused. it's insightful and informative and will give it's readers a lot of food for thought. However, when finishing the book, I came away feeling completely depressed and with a negative mindset. I wanted to sympathize but couldn't get over the feeling that only half the story had been told. Where were the positives and the benefits of growing up Asian in America? There had to be some. I'm from the southern USA and I love Asian food, art, music, and dramas. I love learning new Chinese words from the waitress at my local Chinese food restaurant. I was ready to embrace even more of this wonderfully unique culture, but the book didn't offer that side of the story. For this reason, I only gave the book three stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is an anthology collection comprised of 30 Asian authors/artists. As an Asian American person, it felt both validating to hear about other writers and their similar experiences, and enlightening to hear new perspectives. I also appreciated the diversity among Asian America that was represented in this collection. In the wake of the 2021 Atlanta shootings and the rise of hate crimes against Asians since the start of the pandemic, the pieces in this anthology e My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is an anthology collection comprised of 30 Asian authors/artists. As an Asian American person, it felt both validating to hear about other writers and their similar experiences, and enlightening to hear new perspectives. I also appreciated the diversity among Asian America that was represented in this collection. In the wake of the 2021 Atlanta shootings and the rise of hate crimes against Asians since the start of the pandemic, the pieces in this anthology examine the Asian American identity and how Asian Americans navigate society's expectations of them. Some of my favorites were "Working While Asian", "Facing Myself", and "The Next Draft".

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emi Yoshida

    Interesting mix of autobiographical writers including journalists, executives and a magician. Themes covered will be common to any Asian-American reader, from fitting in, discrimination, stereotypes, fetishism, and being othered. A lot of intriguing issues are raised here but not detailed, leading me to some fruitful research (Spike Lee and Yuri Kochiyama, 2008 films Doubt and Waltz with Bashir, all the victims of Atlanta’s 2021 shooting, and 75-yr old Xiao Zhen Xie in SF who beat her 39-yr old Interesting mix of autobiographical writers including journalists, executives and a magician. Themes covered will be common to any Asian-American reader, from fitting in, discrimination, stereotypes, fetishism, and being othered. A lot of intriguing issues are raised here but not detailed, leading me to some fruitful research (Spike Lee and Yuri Kochiyama, 2008 films Doubt and Waltz with Bashir, all the victims of Atlanta’s 2021 shooting, and 75-yr old Xiao Zhen Xie in SF who beat her 39-yr old white male attacker into submission with a piece of wood); and leaving me also with some unanswered questions: did racism have something to do with the fall of Linsanity? What was the Villa in Manila?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I don't want to write work that is a must-read in May. I don't want to write work that is a must-read when an auntie is beaten. I don't want to write work that is a must-read when an auntie is dead. from "I Don't Want to Write Today" by Shing Yin Khor Context is everything for this book. These essays were written and collected in 2021 in the wake of the Atlanta mass shooting. After a year of enduring rising hate and xenophobia, I think a lot of the Asian community in the United States reached I don't want to write work that is a must-read in May. I don't want to write work that is a must-read when an auntie is beaten. I don't want to write work that is a must-read when an auntie is dead. from "I Don't Want to Write Today" by Shing Yin Khor Context is everything for this book. These essays were written and collected in 2021 in the wake of the Atlanta mass shooting. After a year of enduring rising hate and xenophobia, I think a lot of the Asian community in the United States reached a breaking point after Atlanta, and CAPE decided to move forward with that and gather together a more diverse group of Asian entertainers and writers to shed some light on what it actually means to be an Asian in America. Rhetoric around how (and sometimes, if) Asians experience racism and discrimination in America is clouded by beliefs that Asian people are white-adjacent, high wage earners, and the model minority, but Asian and Pacific Islanders have the biggest disparity in things like income and levels of education among all the groups that fall under the AAPI umbrella. Even a book with thirty essays still struggles to fully represent all Asian groups, though I do think it tries very valiantly to do so, especially in letting writers grapple with inter-community issues like homophobia and anti-blackness. The timing of this book is also why there are not essays extolling the pleasures of growing up Asian in America. Of course there are good things about that, but this isn't the book for those essays. This book is about consciousness raising for both Asians and non-Asians about realities of discrimination, anger, and pain in our communities. To say that every community also has these negative experiences again fully ignores the context of this book. Hate crimes against Asians are not new in this country but many Americans thought they were, so this book tries to humanize the issue with personal stories from people who experienced them. This is especially important because the culture now tells people that they need to "educate themselves" and a lot of people go running to books. What will a book about the beauty of growing up Asian American teach ignorant people about discrimination in an age where it feels like our community is constantly under attack? It might make readers uncomfortable but those readers need to be brave and be willing to listen and learn about how this hate directed towards us is in many ways nothing new. Like any collection, not every essay is equally strong, but this is a book that is most useful as a first read before moving on to other resources.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I think many of the reviews posted about this collection of essays are proof that this collection of essays and others are needed in America. I see commments like: " I like Chinese food & Chinese art and I wanted to know more about the culture" or "This book is so depressing". If you think some parts are "depressing", imagine what it's like to live it everyday. Asian culture is diverse and these essays represent realistic voices with realistic experiences. I don't see the narratives as "depressi I think many of the reviews posted about this collection of essays are proof that this collection of essays and others are needed in America. I see commments like: " I like Chinese food & Chinese art and I wanted to know more about the culture" or "This book is so depressing". If you think some parts are "depressing", imagine what it's like to live it everyday. Asian culture is diverse and these essays represent realistic voices with realistic experiences. I don't see the narratives as "depressing". I see people who share a sense of empowerment in reflecting on their experiences. The readers who want "nice stories" are those who demonstrate what SuChin Pak says in the intro about people wanting to see the "happy minority ". If we truly want to understand other cultures, we need to accept and dig into all parts of the cultures not just the parts we enjoy. As stated in the Afterword:" For anyone who has felt othered, misunderstood,  or insignificant,  this book is for you." 😊

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amethyst

    "Show your unmasked face, and the uniqueness of who you are will be all the magic you need." This is a book that challenges the harmful “model minority” stereotype, or the belief that success among Asian Americans is universal. The stereotype dangerously exacerbates interracial tension and does not acknowledge the socioeconomic disparities among the diverse range of Asian-American subgroups. It also perpetuates a myth that Asian Americans are not afflicted by racism and disregards a longstanding "Show your unmasked face, and the uniqueness of who you are will be all the magic you need." This is a book that challenges the harmful “model minority” stereotype, or the belief that success among Asian Americans is universal. The stereotype dangerously exacerbates interracial tension and does not acknowledge the socioeconomic disparities among the diverse range of Asian-American subgroups. It also perpetuates a myth that Asian Americans are not afflicted by racism and disregards a longstanding history of racially-motivated aggression and discrimination in policy against Asian Americans (e.g., L.A.’s 1871 Chinese Massacre, the Page Act of 1875, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Japanese Internment Camps). Like any other group of people, there is no singular Asian American experience. While there are perhaps shared themes, especially when encountering racism or ignorance for example, the way we process or respond to those situations varies, as does the way we view and identify ourselves. This book highlights our shared humanity and the universal experience of wanting to belong and feel accepted while including 30 contributors who are at the intersection of multiple identities. This compilation includes diverse voices from different ethnicities, backgrounds, and even writing style; yet it still feels cohesive. There are poems, essays, comics, and even quotes from prominent Asian Americans. As a Black and Filipino-American woman who grew up never feeling Filipino or Black enough, I especially connected with Kimiko Matsuda-Lawrence's piece about her experience of also being Black and Asian and interracial tension. Especially with an introduction written by MTV's SuChin Pak (who was a fixture on my television), this book feels like it was written directly to my teenage self, to help me know I wasn't alone and to help me embrace and define myself for myself. Many thanks to the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE), MTV Books, and NetGalley for an opportunity to review an advanced copy of this book which was published earlier this month.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christine Luong

    For anyone who has felt othered, misunderstood, or insignificant, this book is for you. For anyone who has learned (or is still learning) to embrace, celebrate, and share unapologetically who you are, this book is for you. This is the book I didn't know I needed. While the stories that are shared provide a diverse range of perspectives, the common threads of painful experiences woven throughout were strangely comforting. They put to words or illustrations so much of what I felt growing up. The co For anyone who has felt othered, misunderstood, or insignificant, this book is for you. For anyone who has learned (or is still learning) to embrace, celebrate, and share unapologetically who you are, this book is for you. This is the book I didn't know I needed. While the stories that are shared provide a diverse range of perspectives, the common threads of painful experiences woven throughout were strangely comforting. They put to words or illustrations so much of what I felt growing up. The constant code switching and not knowing where you fit in. The "Where were you born? No, I mean where are you really from?" othering. The microaggressions, erasure and racism. But there's also a common thread of hope, in the ever-changing journey of self-discovery, and the sense of community that has grown out of tragedy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I enjoyed reading this. It made me reflect on my own experiences growing up as Asian in a small Canadian town.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    As a white American this book was hard to read. It is a collection of stories by Asian and Pacific Island Americans with reflections upon their culture, experiences and expectations as “other”, as a “model minority” and as a “near white”. At times while reading I got angry, at times guilty, at times sympathetic. It made me question my own actions, comments and judgements and think more broadly.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan Walker

    Really liked this collection of stories. A good read for everyone.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Title: My Life: Growing up Asian in America Author: Melissa de la Cruz, Marie Lu, Aisha Sultan, Nathan Ramos-Park, etc. Narrated by: Jennifer Aquino, Ramón de Ocampo, Deepti Gupta, Kamran R. Khan, Marie Lu, etc. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Length: Approximately 5 hours and 47 minutes Source: Review Copy from Simon & Schuster. Thank-you! May was Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month. I thought it was a great month to listen to My Life: Growing Up Asian in America. This audiobook was 30 Title: My Life: Growing up Asian in America Author: Melissa de la Cruz, Marie Lu, Aisha Sultan, Nathan Ramos-Park, etc. Narrated by: Jennifer Aquino, Ramón de Ocampo, Deepti Gupta, Kamran R. Khan, Marie Lu, etc. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Length: Approximately 5 hours and 47 minutes Source: Review Copy from Simon & Schuster. Thank-you! May was Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month. I thought it was a great month to listen to My Life: Growing Up Asian in America. This audiobook was 30 essays from varying perspectives about growing up Asian in America. “There are 23 million people, representing more than twenty countries, each with unique languages, histories, and cultures, clumped under one banner: Asian American.” Listening to these essays made me realize just how many different experiences there are as an “Asian American.” The essays were heartfelt and interesting. They were put together after the shootings in Atlanta and rise of anti-Asian crimes during the COVID epidemic. They focused on microaggressions and racism that occurred to the authors while growing up. They were told in different styles and with different narrators in the audiobook for each essay. It made it a very interesting listening experience. This was published by the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE) and MTV books. I thought that it was very thought-provoking. I would be interested in listening to more audiobooks like this about different experiences growing up in America. Overall, My Life: Growing up Asian in America is an important book to help understand different perspectives in America. This review was first posted on my blog at: https://lauragerold.blogspot.com/2022...

  13. 5 out of 5

    lily

    Thank you to Netgalley and Atria Books for the e-ARC... ... and a huge thank you to CAPE, the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment, for making this anthology come to life. My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is an essential anthology to read, one that spotlights the multitude of Asian American perspectives and experiences through individual stories. These stories vary across genre, style, and message -- and not all of the stories quite align or agree with one another. This, itself, is the Thank you to Netgalley and Atria Books for the e-ARC... ... and a huge thank you to CAPE, the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment, for making this anthology come to life. My Life: Growing Up Asian in America is an essential anthology to read, one that spotlights the multitude of Asian American perspectives and experiences through individual stories. These stories vary across genre, style, and message -- and not all of the stories quite align or agree with one another. This, itself, is the virtue of the anthology. I took an Asian American history course this semester at my college, and I lamented that despite my professor's efforts to incorporate personal accounts and nuance into the histories taught, the fraught histories of erasure, exclusion, and violent assimilation that shape the Asian American identity as we know it today makes this pursuit for personalized and humanized nuance to be difficult to find. This is where I personally see the merits of artistry as a means of excavating one's ancestry, one that may have traveled across perilous oceans, unreturned promises, unfulfilled dreams, unspoken languages, and unresolved questions. If you'd like to add dimension to your understanding of Asian American histories, or if you appreciate reading personal memoir genres that handle topics of personal identity and reckonings, I would say that this anthology is critical to include in your reading! I look forward to future works that emerge from the footsteps of works such as My Life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Racism knows no color boundaries. The collected essays in My Life: Growing Up Asian in America revealed a segment of our country that I confess ignorance in their alienation. On many levels am I "politically incorrect." For example, a standard question many of us volunteers at a state museum ask is "Where is your home?" No more will I be asking that question. I'll stick with the first question which is "Is this your first visit to our museum?" Yikes. How many people have I made uncomfortable? A Racism knows no color boundaries. The collected essays in My Life: Growing Up Asian in America revealed a segment of our country that I confess ignorance in their alienation. On many levels am I "politically incorrect." For example, a standard question many of us volunteers at a state museum ask is "Where is your home?" No more will I be asking that question. I'll stick with the first question which is "Is this your first visit to our museum?" Yikes. How many people have I made uncomfortable? A lot, even if their English is flawless. When a family member who is Asian, born in Toronto, Canada, was recently "let go" at his job, I suspected performance was not an issue. Fortunately, the library featured this book on its latest acquisitions table, and I took it home and read about half of the personal essays in one sitting. I aim to share with the director of volunteers my revelation on greeting visitors at the museum. This is a something that should be addressed in our volunteer training. I now know better how to welcome our museum guests.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mystic Miraflores

    I am a Filipina-American, who left the Philippines as a baby. After my father retired from his US Navy career, my family went back to the Philippines in 1974 when Ferdinand Marcos was the dictator. Needless to day, after two years my family realized we couldn't live there and returned to the US. (We were all US citizens anyway.) So the stories in this book from the Filipinos are very familiar to me. I definitely felt a kinship with those authors (and who knows, we may even be related from way ba I am a Filipina-American, who left the Philippines as a baby. After my father retired from his US Navy career, my family went back to the Philippines in 1974 when Ferdinand Marcos was the dictator. Needless to day, after two years my family realized we couldn't live there and returned to the US. (We were all US citizens anyway.) So the stories in this book from the Filipinos are very familiar to me. I definitely felt a kinship with those authors (and who knows, we may even be related from way back in the islands). What was eye-opening to me were the stories by the other Asian-Americans, such as the Indian-Americans, Amna Nawaz (whom I admire), and the Japanese/Chinese/Korean and other Southeast Asian writers. It was interesting to read their experiences growing up in the US from their perspectives. Sometimes they are similar to my own experiences, sometimes they are vastly different. I hope CAPE will find some other Asian-Americans and write another book about them. (Hint: I can definitely pass on some names.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    ***Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my honest review*** As one (well, one being an Asian growing up in the US) might expect, there is a lot to relate to in the experiences described in this book. Despite being all different varieties of Asian, a common thread is that of being othered. We are othered in different ways and in varied degrees, but othered nonetheless. We also come to this realization in a variety of ways. There is a repetitiveness to these stories that felt tedious at ***Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my honest review*** As one (well, one being an Asian growing up in the US) might expect, there is a lot to relate to in the experiences described in this book. Despite being all different varieties of Asian, a common thread is that of being othered. We are othered in different ways and in varied degrees, but othered nonetheless. We also come to this realization in a variety of ways. There is a repetitiveness to these stories that felt tedious at times, yet I recognize that this could also be the result of the exhaustion I feel in relating to them. I can only read this as an Asian reader and there is simultaneously a feeling of community in reading these accounts alongside the horror that so many of us are having these revelations in isolation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kea4

    I thought this was going to be a celebration of Asians in America. Yes, it’s short stories and drawings but it’s just so negative. The book acts like prejudice happens to only them when in fact it happens to people everywhere all the time. The book is just so negative. So you’re saying there’s nothing good about growing up Asian in the USA? Nothing? I feel like the good is being left out to push an agenda. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade... I thought this was going to be a celebration of Asians in America. Yes, it’s short stories and drawings but it’s just so negative. The book acts like prejudice happens to only them when in fact it happens to people everywhere all the time. The book is just so negative. So you’re saying there’s nothing good about growing up Asian in the USA? Nothing? I feel like the good is being left out to push an agenda. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ayn Nys

    Excellent compilation of short works about the Asian American experience. I highly recommend the audio book version because the various voice performances make a big difference in how this book is understood and appreciated.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lin Lin

    A unique collection of stories told by diverse Americans who hail from Asian American cultures and communities as they navigate a world in which they are minority. They each write about love, respect, survival, failure, assimilation, microaggression, racism, and privileges.

  20. 5 out of 5

    cindy

    i gained so much insight on the array of experiences of this community and felt truly represented

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I received an ARC of this book from a Goodreads giveaway. A very well written and moving collection, I hope everyone gets a chance to read this book when it is released.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    1

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen Geng

    Read June 2022 NYPL book

  24. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  25. 4 out of 5

    elisha

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chantal

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sue aka Pooh Bear

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...