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Love + Work: How to Find What You Love, Love What You Do, and Do It for the Rest of Your Life

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We're in the middle of an epidemic of stress and anxiety. A global pandemic has wreaked havoc on our lives. Average life expectancy in the United States is down. At work, less than 16 percent of us are fully engaged. In many high-stress jobs, such as distribution centers, emergency room nursing, and teaching, incidences of PTSD are higher than for soldiers returning from w We're in the middle of an epidemic of stress and anxiety. A global pandemic has wreaked havoc on our lives. Average life expectancy in the United States is down. At work, less than 16 percent of us are fully engaged. In many high-stress jobs, such as distribution centers, emergency room nursing, and teaching, incidences of PTSD are higher than for soldiers returning from war zones. We're getting something terribly wrong. We've designed the love out of our workplaces, and our schools too, so that they fail utterly to provide for or capitalize on one of our most basic human needs: our need for love. As Marcus Buckingham shows in this eye-opening, uplifting book, love is an energy, and like all forms of energy, it must flow. It demands expression—and that expression is work. Whether in our professional accomplishments, our relationships, or our response to all the many slings and arrows of life, we know that none of this work will be our best unless it is made with love. There's no learning without love, no innovation, no service, no sustainable growth. Love and work are inextricable. Buckingham first starkly highlights the contours of our loveless work lives and explains how we got here. Next, he relates how we all develop best in response to other human beings. What does a great work relationship look like when the other person is cued to your loves? What does a great team look like when each member is primed to be a mirror, an amplifier, of the loves of another? Finally, he shows how you can weave love back into the world of work as a force for good, how you can use your daily life routines to pinpoint your specific loves, and how you can make this a discipline for the rest of your life. Today, too often, love comes last at work, and we are living the painful consequences of this. Love + Work powerfully shows why love must come first—and how we can make this happen.


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We're in the middle of an epidemic of stress and anxiety. A global pandemic has wreaked havoc on our lives. Average life expectancy in the United States is down. At work, less than 16 percent of us are fully engaged. In many high-stress jobs, such as distribution centers, emergency room nursing, and teaching, incidences of PTSD are higher than for soldiers returning from w We're in the middle of an epidemic of stress and anxiety. A global pandemic has wreaked havoc on our lives. Average life expectancy in the United States is down. At work, less than 16 percent of us are fully engaged. In many high-stress jobs, such as distribution centers, emergency room nursing, and teaching, incidences of PTSD are higher than for soldiers returning from war zones. We're getting something terribly wrong. We've designed the love out of our workplaces, and our schools too, so that they fail utterly to provide for or capitalize on one of our most basic human needs: our need for love. As Marcus Buckingham shows in this eye-opening, uplifting book, love is an energy, and like all forms of energy, it must flow. It demands expression—and that expression is work. Whether in our professional accomplishments, our relationships, or our response to all the many slings and arrows of life, we know that none of this work will be our best unless it is made with love. There's no learning without love, no innovation, no service, no sustainable growth. Love and work are inextricable. Buckingham first starkly highlights the contours of our loveless work lives and explains how we got here. Next, he relates how we all develop best in response to other human beings. What does a great work relationship look like when the other person is cued to your loves? What does a great team look like when each member is primed to be a mirror, an amplifier, of the loves of another? Finally, he shows how you can weave love back into the world of work as a force for good, how you can use your daily life routines to pinpoint your specific loves, and how you can make this a discipline for the rest of your life. Today, too often, love comes last at work, and we are living the painful consequences of this. Love + Work powerfully shows why love must come first—and how we can make this happen.

30 review for Love + Work: How to Find What You Love, Love What You Do, and Do It for the Rest of Your Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Interesting, confusing, illuminating...I learned some things to really help me in the future. I had a bit of a hard time relating to some of the life experiences that Marcus had. I did find his tip on getting in front of people very helpful. I took away from this book, it's great when your heart and soul are both in whatever you are doing. Thank you Harvard Business Review Press and NetGalley for the advance read Interesting, confusing, illuminating...I learned some things to really help me in the future. I had a bit of a hard time relating to some of the life experiences that Marcus had. I did find his tip on getting in front of people very helpful. I took away from this book, it's great when your heart and soul are both in whatever you are doing. Thank you Harvard Business Review Press and NetGalley for the advance read

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bob Selden

    I’m not sure how to write this review – and having written more than 100 previously – that may be a curious thing to say. But having read Love + Work, I know that author Marcus Buckingham will immediately understand. Not understand why I’m having difficulty, for that’s my reason, but understand that it’s not the process of writing the review that’s important to others, but the outcome. The process (the activity of writing) is very important to me, but to you, the reader, it’s the outcome – the r I’m not sure how to write this review – and having written more than 100 previously – that may be a curious thing to say. But having read Love + Work, I know that author Marcus Buckingham will immediately understand. Not understand why I’m having difficulty, for that’s my reason, but understand that it’s not the process of writing the review that’s important to others, but the outcome. The process (the activity of writing) is very important to me, but to you, the reader, it’s the outcome – the review that’s important. Serendipity? I had three similar experiences to Marcus Buckingham that endeared me to this book – you may find others – or none (more on one of these shortly). And that’s one of the key themes, to find what Marcus calls your “red threads”, your uniqueness. To find the “what” of your work role, the activities that turn you on, and are the important things that will make you love your work. As he says, “Find what you love, and love what you do”. I’ll be a bit cheeky here and give one of my own quotes which I think sums up Marcus’ philosophy about work, “You should find something you like doing so much that you’d do it for nothing – then find someone who will pay you for doing it”. As an example of finding this love, Marcus asks, “Do you have a chance to use your strengths every day? In the last week, have you felt excited to work every day?”. To find out what you love to do, Marcus, suggests that you’ll need to learn a new language, the language of love – this is not the traditional notion of “romantic love” (although he does discuss that in relation to work), but the love of work. The very first word to learn in this language is Wyrd. It’s pronounced the same as weird but it’s a noun, as in “You have a Wyrd.” Apparently, it’s an ancient Norse term and the source of your Wyrd is all the activities (or threads) that literally turn you on and make you uniquely you. Marcus terms these your “red threads”. And if you can find these, you’ll be able to seek out work that includes these red threads and provides you with satisfaction, motivation and engagement (later in the book, Marcus suggests ways that employers, managers and leaders can provide strategies for allowing different people doing similar jobs, to find their red threads). Which brings me to one of the experiences I had that was similar to Marcus’ and which started him down the path of identifying his red threads and ultimately establishing his Wyrd as a world class researcher of what makes people unique. It happened when he was nine and in one of the four “House” teams set up by his school to create team loyalties and competitiveness. One day in athletics, as boys were attempting the high-jump, Marcus happened to look around at the boys watching, and as a boy ran up to the high-jump bar, the watchers all lifted a leg off the ground. This happened for all jumpers, irrespective of which House they represented. Apparently, they were empathised with the jumper through their mirror neurons. As Marcus points out, Giacomo Rizzolatti, and his team discovered the existence of these mirror neurons, and that “the leg lifting was a manifestation of our instinctive response to mirror the emotions and actions of others”. Yet interestingly, when Marcus asked boys after the event, “Why did you lift your leg when another boy was jumping?”, they all denied it! This experience was the start of Marcus identifying one of his red threads, which later in life would lead to many people-research projects and writing books such as “Love + Work”. My experience was similar to Marcus’, only mine happened when I was 16. I too was fascinated, well, to be truthful, I found it more humorous at the time, to see the boys lifting their leg at the high-jump attempts. Nor did I ask the boys why they did it – I ruminated on it. My “red thread” from this experience was different and took me quite some years to eventually develop a Wyrd that has become a lifelong desire to understand how people learn. In Love + Work you’ll find many great activities/questions/suggestions to help you develop your own Wyrd, such as the Red Thread Questionnaire, and to whet your appetite, here’s a snippet: “When was the last time . . . . . . you lost track of time? . . . you instinctively volunteered for something? . . . someone had to tear you away from what you were doing?” This is necessarily one of the longest reviews I have written, and if there’s one comment I would make (and it’s probably reflected in the length of this review), is that Marcus does (for me) take considerable time to get to the key points of the discussion. However, take the time, please read this book, and find your Wyrd – you’ll find that your time is really well spent and may indeed change some of the things (or activities) you look for in your current work, or perhaps future career role. Highly recommended – it’s probably Marcus Buckingham’s best book. Bob Selden, www.bobselden.com

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathanael Small

    Inspirational, revelational and frightening at the same time… Marcus’s best book to date. The core thesis about the power of doing work from a place of love is both radical (returning to the source) and such common sense, but sadly all too rarely experienced. This book weaves together several strands from his previous books and integrates them into a new and very practical framework to equip you to figure out what you love in your work and how to do more of it. As much a manifesto as a how-to guide, Inspirational, revelational and frightening at the same time… Marcus’s best book to date. The core thesis about the power of doing work from a place of love is both radical (returning to the source) and such common sense, but sadly all too rarely experienced. This book weaves together several strands from his previous books and integrates them into a new and very practical framework to equip you to figure out what you love in your work and how to do more of it. As much a manifesto as a how-to guide, personally I’m both motivated and scared to fully embrace what he’s arguing for, as to seek love is to open yourself up to the possibility of pain. Becoming aware that you loathe the work you do and that there’s little to no potential to do it with love is something I know I’ve found soul crushing in the past, and am struggling with right now. So while I know what I need to do, the thought of it is deeply disturbing. But if I want to do more than just survive, then at least the path has been made clear. Thank you, Marcus, for showing us how.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Sadly I abandoned this book at around 16%. I skimmed-read until about 20% to see if I could convince myself to continue reading it, but there wasn't any way for me to power through this book. The book's description says "World-renowned researcher and New York Times bestselling author Marcus Buckingham helps us discover where we're at our best—both at work and in life." which gave me expectations for a well-rounded and researched book about purpose and career, identifying your strengths and learn Sadly I abandoned this book at around 16%. I skimmed-read until about 20% to see if I could convince myself to continue reading it, but there wasn't any way for me to power through this book. The book's description says "World-renowned researcher and New York Times bestselling author Marcus Buckingham helps us discover where we're at our best—both at work and in life." which gave me expectations for a well-rounded and researched book about purpose and career, identifying your strengths and learning to bring them forward in your interactions with the world. Instead I was met with an intensively emotional language and many assumptions in discourse in a potentially harmful way. In addition to not having a gripping narration, the book explored the emotional undertones with passages like “linger on this truth, you have galaxies within you”. Buckingham introduced us to his fiancée by using a weird and highly personal extract of her journal without cause other than to parade her pain and suffering - he could easily have picked any famous person sad story instead. One part that really caught my attention and was the first indication I'd DNF the book was the weird implications of school and education system. Even if I agree that the current education system doesn’t necessarily is the basis for a complete life, it does offer transferable skills that will help develop critical thinking. Instead, the author chose to treat it as an institution that has nothing to offer and only hinders children's ability to know their "true self". In the same part of the book, Buckingham also writes Insinuations that parents made their children “surely” intending to offer them love, showing disregard for people’s different past and/or traumatic experiences. When I finally arrived at the gist of the book, I was met with another highly personal narrative. The concept that fueling your uniqueness is the sole way of achieving something you love based on your Wyrd - an “ancient Norse term”, “explicitly spiritual”, so big that the true extent of your uniqueness is more “than five thousand Milky Ways” - is so far from what I expected that it made me roll my eyes. The last straw for me was when the author started using clear categorization to contradict what he himself called categorization as done by “most of Psychology and Social Psychology”. This is not the book I’d expect to be published by Harvard Business Review Press. It has no grounding in science or references to actual published work of scientific value - the book has a total of 7 references, in chapter 1, 2, 3, 6, 18 (with 2) and 20, and only 2 don’t quote a work by the author of the book. Oh, one of those references is the book “The Prophet”, by Kahlil Gibran. Thanks NetGalley and Harvard Business Review Press for the EARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Diane Law

    If you have read books by MB before you will understand the premise of this book right away. It is a very personal account of his experiences and his insights into finding the 'red threads' in what you do - the things in your day that give you a buzz. I found the book to be uplifting and practical. If you have read books by MB before you will understand the premise of this book right away. It is a very personal account of his experiences and his insights into finding the 'red threads' in what you do - the things in your day that give you a buzz. I found the book to be uplifting and practical.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    I absolutely LOVE this book. So affirming for me. There are so many great actionable items for your work and life. This should be required reading! Favorite quote: "Love is someone seeing the fullness of you and wanting you to be the best possible version of you. This is what a relationship is for--any relationship, whether friend, business partner, sibling or lover. It is for each person to do all they can to help the other express their uniqueness as powerfully as possible. Love's goal is to mak I absolutely LOVE this book. So affirming for me. There are so many great actionable items for your work and life. This should be required reading! Favorite quote: "Love is someone seeing the fullness of you and wanting you to be the best possible version of you. This is what a relationship is for--any relationship, whether friend, business partner, sibling or lover. It is for each person to do all they can to help the other express their uniqueness as powerfully as possible. Love's goal is to make the other person bigger."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Bwalya

    Excellent key Cage Opener Very liberating book. Wired to do what I love. It’s a game changer. We caged by standards set by man. This book is a key cage opener. Insightful book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Summerfield

    Honestly I loved this book. Over the past few months I have had the true joy to attend the Love + Work Leader Series that Marcus Buckingham has been hosting. This series was all about sharing different parts in the Love + Work Book. Such a gift. During our recent Alaskan cruise I read Love + Work. Love + Work is the fifth book I have read by Marcus Buckingham. In this book Marcus shares his story, along with the challenges of having a “stammer” in elementary school and a wonderful teacher that he Honestly I loved this book. Over the past few months I have had the true joy to attend the Love + Work Leader Series that Marcus Buckingham has been hosting. This series was all about sharing different parts in the Love + Work Book. Such a gift. During our recent Alaskan cruise I read Love + Work. Love + Work is the fifth book I have read by Marcus Buckingham. In this book Marcus shares his story, along with the challenges of having a “stammer” in elementary school and a wonderful teacher that helps him find his love; going through a divorce; the love in work he discovered earlier in his career; and meeting his fiancé Myshel, her journey and so much more. Love + Work is about finding your red threads and your loves. Throughout this book Marcus highlights some amazing pieces from some of his other books. It is a gift to revisit books like “First, Break All The Rules” and “Nine Lies About Work” that truly highlight the heart of the matter. Captured in this book are several questionnaires to help you discover your red threads and your loves. “Anything of value you offer to others is your work.” Love + Work As we look at our work, we need to look beyond the why to the what. “For your loves to turn into contribution pay attention only to the specific activities you love not the outcomes of those activities.” Love + Work For me this thought in Love + Work captures the essence of this beautiful book. "More love in the place workplace means more respect, more team members seeing the whole person, more elevating of each other no matter what they look like, how they think or whom they love." For those who follow Marcus Buckingham’s work know he is also passionate about helping our students discover their strengths and what they love. Chapter 2 – Where Did The Love Go? features one teacher who changes the question from “Where to you want to go to College” to “When was the last time a day flew by”. If you have read “Nine Lies About Work” and the chapter that People Need Feedback, this thought is so true and feeds into the chapter on advice in Love + Work: “If you want your people to learn more, pay attention to what working for them right now and build on that.” Nine Lies About Work Chapter 12 is titled – Feedbacking – The Road to Hell is Paved with Other People’s Advice. This chapter highlights an experience where Ashley Goodall the co-author of Nine Lies About Work with Marcus, is preparing to record his part of the audiobook. Marcus shares what works for him in recording an audiobook. The thing is in giving advice you are giving it from your perspective and what worked for you. Ashley shares after the recording what worked him. As a pianist, he was familiar with sight-reading. Ashley settled into the rhythm of sight-reading similar as to how he would play a classical piece, as he recorded his parts to the audiobook for Nine Lies About Work. “The Golden Rule states that you should treat people as you would like to be treated. Ashley’s entire approach to doing, thinking, learning, speaking, performing is meaningfully different from mine, and so any advice I gave that worked for me would almost be guaranteed not to work for him. ” Love + Work This chapter is beautiful and so wise. Look for others reactions. This is a time to be curious. “You are using their reaction to what worked to become ever more expert at turning your loves into contribution” Love + Work The feature of “Fear-Fighting – Make Love to Your Fears” in Chapter 13 is such a gift. How often do we let our fears simmer and lead us to inaction? This thought is so amazing By contrast, fear that's examined yields powerful discovery about you at your best. When you get curious and let fear in, what you realize is that your fears are yet one more sign of what you love." In Chapter 18 – Love @ Work – How to Become a Love + Work Leader: this is truly looking at ways we can find those loves in our work and we must looks at the myths. Such as MYTH: The team leader should set goals at the beginning of the year. TRUTH: The team leader should check in with each team member for fifteen minutes each week. Highlighted throughout this chapter are ways to hold these meetings along rituals to revisit. Highlighted is also The Love + Work Organization Interview. “If we get enough talented people like you choosing to join only those organizations where are committed to taking each employee’s loves seriously, then together we’ll be able to affect great change at work.” Love + Work As Marcus has shared in many of his presentations, books and Workshops helping students find their loves is not a nice to have it is a MUST have. I too believe this is important. We need to find new ways for students to discover their loves and strengths in elementary school so these young minds start to understand who they are. A strength is something that strengths you. Marcus Buckingham In Chapter 19 – Love in Learning – Why it is Missing and How you can get it Back: Marcus highlights a deeply personal story about his family and his former wife being arrested for paying another person to take the ACT for their son. The raw emotion of this experience is shared and highlighting ways forward in the A Love + Work School Manifesto and a Love + Work Curriculum. Loved this: “There would be classes on how to make decisions, how to build resilience, how to join a new team, how to be on multiple teams, how to explain yourself to your new team members, how to talk about your strengths without bragging, how to talk about your loves without sounding self-involved.” Love + Work In Chapter 20 – Your Children are Not Your Children – One Thing I Hope you Learned from your Parents: Marcus shares stories about his kids and his parents, along with how his parents brought specialists in to help him find ways to manage his stammer. Another great quote of creating space for our children to discover their loves. "We are parents, and so we are the bow, drawing our children close to use, only to then let them fly far on their own." Throughout the Love + Work Leaders Series and the book the lens of Psychological Safety is an underlying theme. An excellent resource is Timothy Clark’s book The Four Stages of Psychological Safety. Psychological Safety is the secret sauce in finding and sharing your loves. Love + Work is a beautiful book and one I will recommend to many. If reading another book feels like too much, watch a video or two shared by Marcus Buckingham on YouTube or join the next live Instagram. The conversations are always passionate as Marcus invites each of us to discover our loves in work and in life. I hope you have enjoyed my thoughts on Love + Work and you will pick up this wonderful book. To the love of reading. Be inspired. Stay curious. Keep learning.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I am so happy that I was able to read this ARC of Love + Work by Marcus Buckingham, gifted by NetGalley. I've taken the StrengthsFinders assessment twice in my career and I loved everything that I learned about myself, but also the people who work around me and for me. I was eager to dive right into this book which I treated as a follow-up to those lessons. The main theme of the book is that everyone is different and our loves are all different - not a unique idea, but where it took off was that I am so happy that I was able to read this ARC of Love + Work by Marcus Buckingham, gifted by NetGalley. I've taken the StrengthsFinders assessment twice in my career and I loved everything that I learned about myself, but also the people who work around me and for me. I was eager to dive right into this book which I treated as a follow-up to those lessons. The main theme of the book is that everyone is different and our loves are all different - not a unique idea, but where it took off was that to love our work, we need to weave these loves into our work. That doesn't mean our love(s) is 100% of our work, but it needs to be 20%. The book then begins down the path, laying out "the map", to taking your loves seriously and learning how to find them and identify them. I probably could have read through the book in one sitting, but I liked being able to read a chapter here and there and digest it. I can't wait to take my own Red Thread Questionnaire and see how it goes with my team at work, too. So much useful info for me in my own career but also as a leader of people. I found the last 15% or so of the book focused on schooling to be useful to me as a parent of a young child, but I felt it was a little out of place in this book about finding my love in my work. I didn't disagree with the info but felt it wouldn't connect to someone without kids, and it's a large part of the end of the book. I'm giving the book a very solid 3 stars. There are some great takeaways and tangible items that I can look at later and apply over and over to my life. That the book ended with chapters about how to change schools, took a bit away from the excitement that I was feeling. I would definitely recommend this to a friend looking to recapture their love of the work that they do.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karren Hodgkins

    There is an enormous amount of value in your identifying what you love; both for yourself and also for those you work and 'play' with. The contents of this book will help you start the journey, or provide some additional guideposts if it's one you've already started on. Spending time wrestling with the understanding of who you are and your contribution is important and there are questions asked and examples given (stories told) to help the reader explore this. Self-reliance, trusting yourself an There is an enormous amount of value in your identifying what you love; both for yourself and also for those you work and 'play' with. The contents of this book will help you start the journey, or provide some additional guideposts if it's one you've already started on. Spending time wrestling with the understanding of who you are and your contribution is important and there are questions asked and examples given (stories told) to help the reader explore this. Self-reliance, trusting yourself and acknowledging that you are the expert on yourself (no one else), can be powerful outtakes from this book. Marcus's examination of some of the accepted practices will also be helpful for many, eg, believing others know what's better for you than you do yourself. Or it could be one of his definitions, eg what our strengths are... things that make you strong, time passing quickly, things that make you feel you feel good. These are all good things and yet I didn't relate as well to this book as I have to others written by him I am a follower of Marcus (on Instagram and through his direct mails), so I know just how much value he adds to the business community with his research and insights as well as his generosity as he shares so much of his knowledge at no charge. While I really enjoyed his last book, Nine Lies About Work (With Ashley Goodall) and encouraged both clients and friends to buy it, it's not as clear for me with this one. Perhaps that one felt a lot more data-driven with this one adding more of the human aspects in a story format? I think you relate to the many stories, or you don't. 1. it's true the classroom didn't encourage me to explore my uniqueness but other influences did as did my passions. 2, I quickly learnt that some things had to remain hobbies while others could form out a way to earn my living. 3. I don't work within a corporate and neither do my clients(no large teams, very little formal structure). 4. The school experience outlined was more in line with my own, but not my daughter's - interesting! (Perhaps this content would be better made sense of, in a different space?) So for me, "I can't claim I am seeing my story in a new way.' (As promised in the introduction) but I certainly appreciated the focus on the importance of Love in your life and work. With thanks to #Netgalley, Harvard Business Review Press and the author for my Advance Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Cuen

    Overall a good book and a reading I enjoyed BUT the core concept was not alien to me and in that sense, I did not come away with tons of new learnings but a couple of action items. To be honest, this is more of a summary of how Buckingham thinks and his "philosophy" but it's not the kind of research, data-led insights he has us accustomed to. That's not bad and as I said I enjoyed it but good to manage expectations Overall a good book and a reading I enjoyed BUT the core concept was not alien to me and in that sense, I did not come away with tons of new learnings but a couple of action items. To be honest, this is more of a summary of how Buckingham thinks and his "philosophy" but it's not the kind of research, data-led insights he has us accustomed to. That's not bad and as I said I enjoyed it but good to manage expectations

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liesl Andrico

    I like books that grow my thinking of a subject, or make me think deeper or broader. This book expanded my thinking about applying strengths in the workplace, creating a better workplace for my employees, and creating expectations for my children based on research. I can report that in the month since I have read this book I have reduced the conflict and anxiety in my teen-agers life and we are having more moments of laughter and fun. I recommend this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kiswara Mihardja

    Talent is the multiplier. The more energy and attention you invest in it, the greater the yield. The time you spend with your best is, quite simply, your most productive time. ― Marcus Buckingham, First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently Talent is the multiplier. The more energy and attention you invest in it, the greater the yield. The time you spend with your best is, quite simply, your most productive time. ― Marcus Buckingham, First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ray Chan

    This book can help you find & connect your love/passion with work, and bring joy to your life. I love the vivid stories & tools to explain the why, what and how to connect your love with work. Recommended for those who want to find true joy & fulfillment at work!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Apart from the extremely inspiring poem selection and end note on parenting the rest was really repetitive and Cld have been crammed into an article or essay

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tara Franz

    I actually really loved this book and I'm going to explore more. Have applied this immediately at work and it was really helpful. I actually really loved this book and I'm going to explore more. Have applied this immediately at work and it was really helpful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Mattson

    Can never get enough of Marcus Buckingham. Love + Work takes strengths concepts to yet another level.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dimitri

    This book is a great extension on the nine myths of work from the same author. It is about finding your strengths and avoiding sorting as no rating will ever do justice to your uniqueness.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Corene

    Some really helpful nuggets in this

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pat Donovan

    Great book with lots of great insights!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Lame

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hodgkins

    My mum is a huge advocate for Marcus Buckingham and his work. He accompanied us through COVID-19 lockdown, inspiring us with his insights and keeping us amused with his British humour. When news of a new book broke, she lined up all the clips on Instagram for us to watch! So, it is unsurprising (though I was still caught off guard) that the content in it has a familiarity to it. Based on Marcus’ life, in an almost autobiographical sense, it weaves a thread of how the world changed how he saw him My mum is a huge advocate for Marcus Buckingham and his work. He accompanied us through COVID-19 lockdown, inspiring us with his insights and keeping us amused with his British humour. When news of a new book broke, she lined up all the clips on Instagram for us to watch! So, it is unsurprising (though I was still caught off guard) that the content in it has a familiarity to it. Based on Marcus’ life, in an almost autobiographical sense, it weaves a thread of how the world changed how he saw himself, and affected his beliefs about his career, and does the same to millions of others. Integrating research data, Marcus translates facts into story and back again to make the book an easy flowing read. The first chapter bewildered me, I have been unbelievably fortunate in having remarkably supportive parents who never tried to “box” me into anything and encouraged me to do what I loved, at school, out of it and in work. At work (with my mum) I get to do what I love every day. So in love with my work am I that when I developed a chronic pain condition and needed to escape the pain, with pudgy sore hands, mum and a dear friend let me strategise marketing a business – a happy place for hours! Eight hours later, I could rest. My work is wonderfully distracting. My school was an incredibly driven and ambitious environment but I am a natural academic and my subjects were for the most part a space in which I was comfortable. All of this led me to wondering if this was the book for me, I didn’t relate to Marcus’ journey at all. But, as I reflected on those in my school who struggled, those in my family and friendship circle who have battled to find their passion in work, when I see the spirits our global systems break in trying to create conformity, I found my groove with this book. So, if the first few pages don’t capture you, don’t stop! I have already referenced it in a meeting, discussed Marcus’ perspective about school and know I’ll keep coming back to it in the future. It is a starting point, the beginning of a different conversation, it is mindset shifting. It isn’t a how to but rather a perspective on how it can be done, what can be and research touch points on the impact of making this kind of change in thinking. It is a four out of five on the enJOYment scale, highly recommended!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gina

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angina

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clare

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Bradley

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley B

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eugenio

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