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The Visitors

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C can’t pay her debts. Once a renowned textile artist, her husband has left her sole proprietor of a small crafts store in Lower Manhattan. He’s also left C with their empty apartment, a stack of medical bills, and a persistent hallucination in the form of a funny little man with a tall red hat and a taste for systems theory. Threatened with the loss of home, livelihood and C can’t pay her debts. Once a renowned textile artist, her husband has left her sole proprietor of a small crafts store in Lower Manhattan. He’s also left C with their empty apartment, a stack of medical bills, and a persistent hallucination in the form of a funny little man with a tall red hat and a taste for systems theory. Threatened with the loss of home, livelihood and sanity, C seeks out some aid, if not charity. Her childhood friend V, now a wealthy financier, would happily assist, if only C’s pride and feelings of both attachment and desire would allow her to ask for help. Instead, C paces the city’s streets as protesters gather in a square downtown, her days punctuated by the developing news story of a terrorist threat to take down the national grid, plunging the United States―not to mention this novel―into darkness and chaos. . With C’s sense of economic, romantic, and artistic potential all thwarted, the boundaries between her strange visitor’s consciousness and C’s own begin to dissipate, until C returns, finally, to her abandoned art for a final, horrifying ‘project’ that will allow her to regain some control over her fate. . Darkly funny and uncannily percipient, The Visitors looks at our world darkly, presenting a Pynchonesque alternate timeline in which the Occupy protests didn’t sputter out; where terrorists can upload malware directly into your head; where gnomes talk like Don DeLillo. Is this science fiction? Maybe. But it feels altogether right and almost real . . . a witty but sobering message from both the recent past and our impossible future.


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C can’t pay her debts. Once a renowned textile artist, her husband has left her sole proprietor of a small crafts store in Lower Manhattan. He’s also left C with their empty apartment, a stack of medical bills, and a persistent hallucination in the form of a funny little man with a tall red hat and a taste for systems theory. Threatened with the loss of home, livelihood and C can’t pay her debts. Once a renowned textile artist, her husband has left her sole proprietor of a small crafts store in Lower Manhattan. He’s also left C with their empty apartment, a stack of medical bills, and a persistent hallucination in the form of a funny little man with a tall red hat and a taste for systems theory. Threatened with the loss of home, livelihood and sanity, C seeks out some aid, if not charity. Her childhood friend V, now a wealthy financier, would happily assist, if only C’s pride and feelings of both attachment and desire would allow her to ask for help. Instead, C paces the city’s streets as protesters gather in a square downtown, her days punctuated by the developing news story of a terrorist threat to take down the national grid, plunging the United States―not to mention this novel―into darkness and chaos. . With C’s sense of economic, romantic, and artistic potential all thwarted, the boundaries between her strange visitor’s consciousness and C’s own begin to dissipate, until C returns, finally, to her abandoned art for a final, horrifying ‘project’ that will allow her to regain some control over her fate. . Darkly funny and uncannily percipient, The Visitors looks at our world darkly, presenting a Pynchonesque alternate timeline in which the Occupy protests didn’t sputter out; where terrorists can upload malware directly into your head; where gnomes talk like Don DeLillo. Is this science fiction? Maybe. But it feels altogether right and almost real . . . a witty but sobering message from both the recent past and our impossible future.

30 review for The Visitors

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    The Visitors is set in New York in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, which now seems like a golden age in our post-2016 world. The story follows C, a textile artist, who may or may not be hallucinating the presence of a gnome-like visitor in her apartment. The gnome, silent at first, increasingly becomes prone to detailed exposition on subjects such as computer networks and the inner workings of financial markets. It's unclear whether the gnome is meant to know what he's talking about, The Visitors is set in New York in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, which now seems like a golden age in our post-2016 world. The story follows C, a textile artist, who may or may not be hallucinating the presence of a gnome-like visitor in her apartment. The gnome, silent at first, increasingly becomes prone to detailed exposition on subjects such as computer networks and the inner workings of financial markets. It's unclear whether the gnome is meant to know what he's talking about, with his utterances falling somewhere between gibberish and mansplaining. Other plot lines involve an unsuccessful pregnancy, unrequited lesbian romance, and shadowy hactivists. All of this captures well the tone and tenor of the Occupy era, typified by a smallish group of relatively well off (mostly white) urbanites, spouting conspiracy theories and railing against the 1%. This is a novel where I enjoyed the set up better than the actual experience of reading. In part, this may have been because I found C to be a tedious bore, but I also think this would have been more impactful, and certainly better focused, as a short story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alwynne

    Jessi Jezewska Stevens’s speculative novel builds on her work as a climate activist, and her fascination with economic systems and theories, as well as her interest in the hacktivism of people like artist Simona Levi. It’s not an easily accessible piece partly because Stevens is exploring the possibilities, or impossibilities, of the novel form as a vehicle for expressing complex political and social ideas, particularly when it comes to capitalism and the systems that sustain it; and partly beca Jessi Jezewska Stevens’s speculative novel builds on her work as a climate activist, and her fascination with economic systems and theories, as well as her interest in the hacktivism of people like artist Simona Levi. It’s not an easily accessible piece partly because Stevens is exploring the possibilities, or impossibilities, of the novel form as a vehicle for expressing complex political and social ideas, particularly when it comes to capitalism and the systems that sustain it; and partly because I’m nowhere near her ideal reader. Stevens, whose background’s in mathematics, has made it clear she’s writing as much for engineers and fellow activists, as any typical, arts-oriented consumer of literary fiction. The Visitors also incorporates aspects of her earlier, debut novel’s preoccupations, connected with, or perhaps implicated in, what critic Jess Bergman has dubbed “denuded realism” the relatively-recent subgenre of fiction centring on alienated young women typified by the output of authors like Ottessa Moshfegh and Catherine Lacey. The Visitors leads with C a former textile artist, clearly influenced by Anni Albers who, at first, appears to fit the bill of the now-familiar, numbed, traumatised female character adrift in contemporary society. C’s experience’s contrasted with Zo, her best friend since childhood and a high-flyer in finance. Their relationship’s further complicated by C’s awareness of her desire for Zo at the point when Zo, after years of proclaiming her lesbian identity, has taken up with a man. The narrative’s set in an alternative version of the period following 2008’s financial meltdown, Occupy is in full force, and a eco-hacktivist collective GoodNite is attempting to reset society by bringing down the National Grid once and for all. Meanwhile C’s apartment’s now occupied by an unexpected visitor, a creature resembling a garden-gnome who’s given to a mix of equally gnomic pronouncements and long expositions on the intricacies of computer and financial networks. Possibly a hallucination, possibly a manifestation of psychic malware, he also has a disconcerting tendency to sound like an escapee from a Don DeLillo novel, operating as a conduit for the introduction of numerous technical references to economics and other systems. It’s a bizarre piece in some ways and difficult to pin down but, for whatever reason, I found it a strangely captivating one, compulsively readable despite its challenges and flaws, intelligent, ambitious, thought-provokingly messy and sometimes unexpectedly devastating. Thanks to Edelweiss and publisher And Other Stories for an arc

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 3? 5? 9? stars of five I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. My Review: All progress, so it seems, is coupled to regression elsewhere. — Author JESSI JEZEWSKA STEVENS, The Visitors A Hymn of Praise to the Great Publisher AND OTHER STORIES , which dwelleth in the Sheffield of Reeds, the Rulers of Literature! Thou art the first-born fruit of Stefan Tobler's psychic womb. Thou art they whose brows are lofty. Thou hast gained possession of the Formula of Publishing, Rating: 3? 5? 9? stars of five I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. My Review: All progress, so it seems, is coupled to regression elsewhere. — Author JESSI JEZEWSKA STEVENS, The Visitors A Hymn of Praise to the Great Publisher AND OTHER STORIES , which dwelleth in the Sheffield of Reeds, the Rulers of Literature! Thou art the first-born fruit of Stefan Tobler's psychic womb. Thou art they whose brows are lofty. Thou hast gained possession of the Formula of Publishing, Publishing = Supply + Demand + Magic, and used this with the rank and dignity of the divine forebears Knopf, Calder, and Busby. Thy literary nous is wide-spread. Thy existence shall resound in the welkin of words. Grant thou to me glory in reading and breadth in comprehension in the form of an unbenighted reader, and the power to pass in through and to pass out from the bewilderingly dense and mannerèd prose of this, thy author JESSI JEZEWSKA STEVENS, whose words possess humor and trenchance yet surpass my ability to grasp them. Homage to thee, O Progenitors of Those En Avant. I have fought for thee, I am one of those who wisheth for words of wisdom and meaning beyond those that make the women tear out their hair. I unbolt the door on the Shrine of Feminism in TERFless lands. I enter in among and come forth with the Goddesses of Literary Experimentation on the day of the destruction of James Patterson and J.K. Rowling. I look upon the hidden things in THE VISITORS and recite the words of the liturgy of Rachel Cusk. Hail, O Ye Who Make Perfect Souls to enter into the House of Woolf and Stein, make ye the well-instructed soul of the Reader Mudge. Let him hear even as ye hear; let him have sight even as ye have sight; let him stand up under this onslaught of ideas even as ye have stood up; let him take his seat even as ye have taken your seats, for he is mightily worn out. Hail, O Ye Who Open Up The Way, who act as guides through the thickets of recursion and coding-inflected ideas, to the perfect souls in the House of Literature. May he enter into the House of AND OTHER STORIES with boldness, because there is no trace of compehension in him. May there be no opposition made to him, nor may he be sent out again therefrom for his dimwittedness. May he not be found light in the Balance, and may the Feather of Book-Ma'at decide his case. with my most sincere apologies to the shade of E.A. Wallis Budge, translator of The Book of Going Forth By Day, to whose prose I have done great and grievous violence; and to JESSI JEZEWSKA STEVENS, whose erudition and verve with language dwarf my own limited capacities to comprehend them

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I liked this review from Rivka Galchen: “The Visitors is about business: the business of staying alive, the business of being with others, the business of staying sane, and the business of business.’” I’m very much interested in the business of the first three and very much uninterested in the last. Lucky for me most of the novel is about the first three. Unfortunately for me, there are many pages that focus in on the details of the mortgage crisis & wall street trading & air gaps that will save I liked this review from Rivka Galchen: “The Visitors is about business: the business of staying alive, the business of being with others, the business of staying sane, and the business of business.’” I’m very much interested in the business of the first three and very much uninterested in the last. Lucky for me most of the novel is about the first three. Unfortunately for me, there are many pages that focus in on the details of the mortgage crisis & wall street trading & air gaps that will save the US power grid from being hacked by eco-terrorists but also leave it vulnerable because of its separation (I have no idea what I’m talking about) & rainbow tables. Interestingly enough, a lot of this dialogue comes from an imagined/stress induced vision of a little gnome that accompanies our narrator around !! Strange, but fun. I just really jive with this author’s writing. I loved her debut, The Exhibition of Persephone Q, and The Visitors contained a lot of what I loved about Percy Q: a woman adrift, lost in life, with a haunted feel. Just throw in a lot of Wall Street traders jargon + an ethereal talking gnome and you have The Visitors. As a climate activist and holder of a mathematics degree, Stevens is writing for a wider audience, including engineers and activists, with this experimental novel and she’s so freakin smart I think it’ll work for all parties. Though I can’t say I fully understood all messages being transmitted, give me a well written story of a woman slowly losing her mind and I’m happy. I question what this says about me. & a killer ending.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Davin

    God this was boring.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aron

    Jessi Jezewska Stevens is a talented writer. However, to quote Thanos, her politics bore me. And since her politics permeate the book, the book is boring. I tried, I really did, I got half way through and since I am an obsessive and can’t not finish a book I started, I decided to skim the rest. I was shocked and angered by how she ended the book. Sure, I found C so emotionally infantile and I couldn’t really care about her. But we what the author did to her was just cruel. Your characters are yo Jessi Jezewska Stevens is a talented writer. However, to quote Thanos, her politics bore me. And since her politics permeate the book, the book is boring. I tried, I really did, I got half way through and since I am an obsessive and can’t not finish a book I started, I decided to skim the rest. I was shocked and angered by how she ended the book. Sure, I found C so emotionally infantile and I couldn’t really care about her. But we what the author did to her was just cruel. Your characters are your children, how can you treat them so badly? As an aside, I lived on Wall Street during Occupy. Landlords were desperate, and we got a great apartment for a steal. Occupy was an absolute joke. Maybe 150 people tops in the tent park. Some rallies had 20 people. Having witnessed tens of thousands at the 2011 protests in Spain, the arrogance and American exceptionalism that made this pathetic protest seem innovative or earth shattering, always annoyed me. The slogan about the 1% was to hide the fact that the protestors were part of the top 10-20% and had no clue what real poverty means. Neither does C and neither does the author, who tries to romanticize a political milieu which meant nothing and accomplished nothing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    J Earl

    The Visitors, by Jessi Jezewska Stevens, is a well-written but scattered novel. Its success will as likely hinge on what a reader brings to the book as on the actual action in the book. Some readers like to minimize reality by stating falsehoods, suddenly 5000-10000 marchers become a couple of hundred. And they like to judge who can speak about hardship and poverty at the same time they talk about renting an apartment in Manhattan. Hypocrites be hypocrites, leave them to their delusions. There is The Visitors, by Jessi Jezewska Stevens, is a well-written but scattered novel. Its success will as likely hinge on what a reader brings to the book as on the actual action in the book. Some readers like to minimize reality by stating falsehoods, suddenly 5000-10000 marchers become a couple of hundred. And they like to judge who can speak about hardship and poverty at the same time they talk about renting an apartment in Manhattan. Hypocrites be hypocrites, leave them to their delusions. There is plenty to like or dislike about the book without showing one's arrogance on topics you feel the need to lie about. I don't usually go into much discussion about my rating, they aren't that big of a deal, but in this case it will help to explain my feelings about the book. In one respect it was a solid three, in another it was a solid four. I went with the four because I think it is the more valuable understanding of the book. So... It is a three because while the writing is quite good and there are a lot of very good scenes, the plot and storyline seemed a bit too jumbled to enjoy as much as I would have liked. It is a four because the dynamic between the book and my thinking took me to some interesting places. I thought about big issues and very personal ones, about theory and praxis, about where we draw the line between what is best for me and what is best for society (or where we draw the ethical/moral line between selfishness and selflessness). Ultimately, while the novel as a novel was simply okay, the novel as thought-provoker was very good. Since I value what I take away from a book more than just the enjoyment of the act of reading, the four rating won out. While I am emphasizing the qualities that most spoke to me, I don't think everyone will feel the same. Some may well not care or engage in either way, while some may be so caught up in the story itself that any other thoughts is just frosting on the cake. I would recommend this to readers who don't mind grappling a bit with an unusual book, though I wouldn't likely recommend this to those comfortable with the status quo and their entitlements, it might provoke them to make demonstrably wrong comments about social movements. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via LibraryThing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    C

    AH I could tell by this wonderfully weird and perfect cover (and it's also the perfect cover for this book) that I would love the wonderfully weird contents. The back cover also had me when it mentioned the Darkest Timeline which, correct me if I'm wrong, can only remind me of my favorite show of all time. By page twenty or so, I was grinning like the little troll from the Darkest Timeline (probably the troll is kin to the gnome). AH the weird plot, the weird main character, the weirdie little g AH I could tell by this wonderfully weird and perfect cover (and it's also the perfect cover for this book) that I would love the wonderfully weird contents. The back cover also had me when it mentioned the Darkest Timeline which, correct me if I'm wrong, can only remind me of my favorite show of all time. By page twenty or so, I was grinning like the little troll from the Darkest Timeline (probably the troll is kin to the gnome). AH the weird plot, the weird main character, the weirdie little gnome man floating around... possibly hallucination, possibly not. The main character called C is a crafty person who also owns an art supply store in NYC when the economy collapses in 2008. But something is much awry with C, C is also collapsing... or maybe reality is collapsing. Such a puzzle! Such a whirlwind! The ending hits on at least three levels! As a bonus, as the book starts, it looks like old computer code on a black screen, the plot hinting at some sort of hack attack. It's all great stuff. In interviews the writer has mentioned that this is a systems novel crossed with a domestic novel. I'm in awe that someone who has a bachelor's degree in math can also be a genius with words. Which might be the one thing that sways people from this book, as I know it was way over my head at times, especially when it discusses the stock market or hacking. The nuanced smartness levels of this book might be off putting to some readers -- but I was along for the ride. I love a flailing, alienated young woman story, especially if you add something extra (ie: gnomes.) This writer is extremely smart but I'll follow this writer to any book she decides to write. Luckily I get to go back to the first novel she wrote a couple years ago. I'm so thankful for this weird little book and it's also FOR SURE going on the list that is one of my favorite genres: 'She's Not Feeling Good At All' ( https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1... ) Set this on the shelf next to: Luster - Raven Leilani A Line Made By Walking - Sara Baume Milk Fed - Melissa Broder Overthrow - Caleb Crain Red Pill - Hari Kunzru Mr Robot (another favorite TV show)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    A strange and challenging little novel. C is an artist, a weaver, the daughter of a Yugoslavian immigrant mother, and now the owner of a New York City art supply store spiraling into debt. When the story opens, we have just crested into the worst of the 2008 economic crash, which C weathered along with a divorce and an emergency hysterectomy. She had some success with monumental woven art pieces that were sold and celebrated, but has distanced herself from that world of dealers and patrons. On t A strange and challenging little novel. C is an artist, a weaver, the daughter of a Yugoslavian immigrant mother, and now the owner of a New York City art supply store spiraling into debt. When the story opens, we have just crested into the worst of the 2008 economic crash, which C weathered along with a divorce and an emergency hysterectomy. She had some success with monumental woven art pieces that were sold and celebrated, but has distanced herself from that world of dealers and patrons. On the other hand, she seems equally uncomfortable with the politics and revolutions of the Occupy activists camping on Wall Street. She both envies her best friend since childhood, Zo, for the wealth shes wrangled through Finance, and cannot level with the implications and processes of the system. She is a woman increasingly unstuck from her own life, and also, a tiny floating man has appeared in her apartment, who may be a hallucination, but seems strangely knowledgeable about the ecoterrorist cyber-attacks that the news shows crippling cities around the world. That's a lot of concept for what is ultimately a story of two women and the relationship they have with themselves and each other. The confusion and alienation they feel as they try to find, or choose to loose, their feet is palpable in Jessi Jezewska Steven's prose. It took me maybe the first third of the book to grasp its pattern, and voice, but by then the suggestions scattered throughout of what was actually about to happen began to coalesce. I think one could read this as an indictment of late-stage capitalism, but the little gnome's ongoing commentary makes me think it's more about the challenges of simply being a human in a world striving for order. Not that I really know what was up with that little guy in the first place, but I don't mind a mystery.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John

    Set on a post-Great Financial Crisis background defined by Occupy Wall Street and mysterious organised groups of cyber hackers, this is the latest tale of passive individual meandering through life forced upon them by the nihilism of 'the end of capitalism'. C’s sense of economic, romantic, and artistic potential are all gradually thwarted -- although its not clear that she tried very hard, her motivation stifled by the odds stacked against her, as if she were moving through treacle. The book is Set on a post-Great Financial Crisis background defined by Occupy Wall Street and mysterious organised groups of cyber hackers, this is the latest tale of passive individual meandering through life forced upon them by the nihilism of 'the end of capitalism'. C’s sense of economic, romantic, and artistic potential are all gradually thwarted -- although its not clear that she tried very hard, her motivation stifled by the odds stacked against her, as if she were moving through treacle. The book is interspersed with the odd philosophical musing, and even a few pages discussing the flaws of the Efficient Market Hypothesis and its application to derivatives trading! Perhaps the lines that stuck the most with this reader were: "Genius can't tell me anything I don't already know, except perhaps exactly that: there are limits to what you can know, and you have reached them. Everything after that is speculation, or worse, faith." It is perhaps a little harsh to rate this book only with 3 stars. It is based on my rule of thumb of being guided by how memorable the book proves a few days/weeks later. But maybe that is a reflection on me - as the author tells us "[as a reader] You follow the [author's] finger, you look, and you see, but whether you see what the writer intends, or something utterly different, is an outcome not just of the writer's genius but of yours [or the lack of it!]. In that sense every book is a choose-your-own-adventure." (p.37)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was an odd book that I strangely thoroughly enjoyed reading, even though i am not quite sure I’d recommend it broadly (although a few of my friends I’m sure would enjoy it at least conceptually). The book takes place in NYC in a modern day alternative reality, where “The Crash” has occurred—a financial fallout across the country, resulting in multiple economic failures across all layers of society. Subsequent to this, a coordinated group of individuals create some sort of computer virus tha This was an odd book that I strangely thoroughly enjoyed reading, even though i am not quite sure I’d recommend it broadly (although a few of my friends I’m sure would enjoy it at least conceptually). The book takes place in NYC in a modern day alternative reality, where “The Crash” has occurred—a financial fallout across the country, resulting in multiple economic failures across all layers of society. Subsequent to this, a coordinated group of individuals create some sort of computer virus that brings down the electrical grid across the US. In the midst of this setting of societal deterioration, a very talented artist slowly unwinds and unravels (ironically, her art is weaving). She begins as a small business owner holding on (barely) and slowly makes worse and worse decisions as her grasp and care for reality erode away. I truly enjoyed her character. This is not only a criticism of consumerism, but a portrait of how easy it is for the smart and successful individual under distress to gently and almost invisibly step over the line to self destruction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    The blurb made The Visitors sound like a clever, whimsical romp, but I found it haunting and sad. The novel is effective in a range of ways -- it critiques capitalism, depicts loneliness, and captures Occupy-era New York City -- by being fucking real. My only complaint is that it does too much and, all considered, doesn't hold together. I want the beautiful ekphrastic novel, the surreal gnome encounters, and the horror-film ending, but I don't want it all at once. The blurb made The Visitors sound like a clever, whimsical romp, but I found it haunting and sad. The novel is effective in a range of ways -- it critiques capitalism, depicts loneliness, and captures Occupy-era New York City -- by being fucking real. My only complaint is that it does too much and, all considered, doesn't hold together. I want the beautiful ekphrastic novel, the surreal gnome encounters, and the horror-film ending, but I don't want it all at once.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    I enjoyed this novel quite a bit. Interesting characters. The best friend/should be lover who is part of the big short. The visitor gnome who thinks it suppose to bae her spiritual guide. All wonderful. I gave it a 4 because I felt the ending didn’t support the main character. It took away from the force that C presents in the novel. Still an interesting novel, a look at a post- economic fall

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karola Karlson

    About 50 pages into the book, I still didn't see the point of the show-offish use of hardly readable sentences and the nonsensical ideas that the author tried to convey. Neither language nor meaning could justify the hype around the book. About 50 pages into the book, I still didn't see the point of the show-offish use of hardly readable sentences and the nonsensical ideas that the author tried to convey. Neither language nor meaning could justify the hype around the book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The writing is wonderful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Hawpe

    A brainy, acidic noir dream of late stage capitalism and American entropy for fans of TV's Mr. Robot, and Jennifer Egan. Also there's a a sentient garden gnome. A brainy, acidic noir dream of late stage capitalism and American entropy for fans of TV's Mr. Robot, and Jennifer Egan. Also there's a a sentient garden gnome.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    completely tormented characters who feel nothing and everything. This incredible book got me fucked up

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    relentlessly inventive, compelling, full of bon mots. A disorienting tale of the age of debt - economic debt, social debt, technical debt. An absolute banger. Vertiginous

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Jaken

    An intense ride in which C’s world slowly unravels is set against the background of Occupy Wall Street demonstrations. Meanwhile, the eco- terrorist group GoodNite tries to hit a system-wide reset button by taking down the electric grid. Stevens uses her elegant prose to weave these stories into a unique Systems novel that exposes fundamental flaws in our basic institutions.

  20. 4 out of 5

    April Hernandez

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathan St.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ella

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alison

  26. 4 out of 5

    Teddy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hazyhazy

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Wyatt

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

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