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How to Prevent the Next Pandemic

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The COVID-19 pandemic isn't over. But even as governments around the world try to get it under control, they're also starting to talk about what happens next. How can we prevent another pandemic from killing millions of people and devastating the global economy? Can we even hope to accomplish this? Bill Gates believes the answer is yes, and he has written a largely upbeat b The COVID-19 pandemic isn't over. But even as governments around the world try to get it under control, they're also starting to talk about what happens next. How can we prevent another pandemic from killing millions of people and devastating the global economy? Can we even hope to accomplish this? Bill Gates believes the answer is yes, and he has written a largely upbeat book that lays out clearly and convincingly what the world should learn from COVID-19, explains the science of fighting pandemics, and suggests what all of us can do to help prevent another one.


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The COVID-19 pandemic isn't over. But even as governments around the world try to get it under control, they're also starting to talk about what happens next. How can we prevent another pandemic from killing millions of people and devastating the global economy? Can we even hope to accomplish this? Bill Gates believes the answer is yes, and he has written a largely upbeat b The COVID-19 pandemic isn't over. But even as governments around the world try to get it under control, they're also starting to talk about what happens next. How can we prevent another pandemic from killing millions of people and devastating the global economy? Can we even hope to accomplish this? Bill Gates believes the answer is yes, and he has written a largely upbeat book that lays out clearly and convincingly what the world should learn from COVID-19, explains the science of fighting pandemics, and suggests what all of us can do to help prevent another one.

30 review for How to Prevent the Next Pandemic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bill Gates

    I believe that COVID-19 can be the last pandemic. In my upcoming book, I lay out the specific steps we can take to not only stop future pandemics but provide better health care for everyone around the world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mansoor

    Bill Gates genuinely thinks the real-world viruses are just like his Windows "viruses." Almost all of the book's critical claims are either not proved or shockingly false. Bill Gates genuinely thinks the real-world viruses are just like his Windows "viruses." Almost all of the book's critical claims are either not proved or shockingly false.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Parmida R. A.

    Look who's talking...! For more information regarding my rating, please read a sophisticated and comprehensive review of my Goodread's friend, Missy. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Look who's talking...! For more information regarding my rating, please read a sophisticated and comprehensive review of my Goodread's friend, Missy. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Voyt

    One World Order, One World Health: Yeah, in order to have it, we need 'quality' people completely unqualified like Bill Gates to tell us how to do things. He instructs world what to eat (bugs, artificial meat), how to manage climate (move Earth further from the Sun ..stupid..lol) and finaly this, about 'plandemics'. This book has the 'WHO' in almost every sentence, as its master/owner (13% of total donations) presents the plan. It involves team of 3000 global 'experts' (GERM TEAM..lol) detecting s One World Order, One World Health: Yeah, in order to have it, we need 'quality' people completely unqualified like Bill Gates to tell us how to do things. He instructs world what to eat (bugs, artificial meat), how to manage climate (move Earth further from the Sun ..stupid..lol) and finaly this, about 'plandemics'. This book has the 'WHO' in almost every sentence, as its master/owner (13% of total donations) presents the plan. It involves team of 3000 global 'experts' (GERM TEAM..lol) detecting suspicious (meaning: purposely created in the labs) CLUSTERS of diseases..all under the WHO supervision. They will share info with all pseudo, infiltrated by WEF governments. Testing, diagnostic tools + VACCINES (obviously genome vaccines, cause Gates is the biggest investor in it) will be quickly produced GLOBALLY against all known and TO BE DISCOVERED viruses. It all requires protocol, logistics, delivery..in every pseudo-country, by the WHO. 'Germ teams' will practice and play "Germ Games" (meaning lockdowns + forced injections of toxic substances into arms of participating /uninformed individuals) here and there , to be ready for swift action. When will he call for the "Hunger Games" with his $6 billion spent on agriculture over the past 17 years: pesticides and GMOs being pushed on small farmers under guise of 'charity' ? Gates claims a lot about lockdowns and most of it is unproven or completely false. He seems to be saying that in an ideal world, we would live with rolling lockdowns forever, on the say-so of 'experts' in his pay. Finally Gates predicts that "Diseases will alway be around and spread".. If they do not, this autor will make sure of it. This book is basically a blue print for the WHO, and should be taken seriously, perhaps like Mein Kampf, because it represents much more danger to humanity than any virus or germ.

  5. 4 out of 5

    B.Green

    Garbage. This man cannot be trusted. Please pay me back for my time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Bill Gates, one of the five wealthiest humans, delivers a masterpiece of popular science writing. He clearly lays out the basics of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how individuals, governments, and non-governmental organizations responded to it, for better or worse. He puts the pandemic in context with his longstanding personal interest in preventing disease and redressing global health inequities. Gates (aided by a long list of helpers he credits) writes an essential book for anyone trying to make s Bill Gates, one of the five wealthiest humans, delivers a masterpiece of popular science writing. He clearly lays out the basics of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how individuals, governments, and non-governmental organizations responded to it, for better or worse. He puts the pandemic in context with his longstanding personal interest in preventing disease and redressing global health inequities. Gates (aided by a long list of helpers he credits) writes an essential book for anyone trying to make sense of the greatest global disruption most of us have experienced. Get this book and read it. It's going to shape much of the conversation. However, no single book can exhaust a topic so large and still evolving. Gates is particularly strong on microbiology and technological responses (such as genetic sequencing of pathogens, and developing and distributing test kits, vaccines, and antiviral drugs). However, while Gates touches on the psychological and social aspects of the pandemic, he appears to be less engaged with them. In part this is because psychology as a science hasn't gotten nearly as far as microbiology. The human brain is far more complex than any microbe, after all, so psychologists have a vastly more difficult job. Psychology hasn't yet produced anything as effective as a vaccine for mental pathologies. However, Gates doesn't seem to be as informed as he should be about what psychology does bring to the table (more on this below). In 2015 Gates presented his TED talk The next outbreak? We’re not ready. Sadly, the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 proved him right - we weren't ready. Gates describes how governments around the world played frantic catch-up, with varying degress of success. Some nations (such as Japan) performed better than others (such as my USA). Even though Japan's population is older than America's, and therefore at higher risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19, Japan's COVID-19 death rate was a fraction of America's, in no small part because Japan has the world's highest compliance with mask mandates. Although we're still not out of the COVID-19 pandemic yet, Gates is already looking ahead to future pathogenic threats, and he gave a newer TED talk about that. That brings us to the book's title - How to Prevent the Next Pandemic. Yes, Gates has a plan to stop the next one before it gets past the outbreak stage. I imagine this might attract some controversy from across the political spectrum. (And what was Gates thinking when he coined his "GERM team" for Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization? I'm no expert on marketing and branding, but that seems to make life too easy for late-night comedians. At least make the joke writers work a little.) Conservatives might not like having science inform policy (they never do), and liberals might not like the lack of any real plan for tackling global inequality (for example by taxing and redistributing the wealth of centibillionaires such as Gates himself). But the main obstacle to Gates' plan is most likely simple human complacency, which Gates acknowledges. All pandemics end eventually, either fading to endemism, evolving toward lower virulence, or vanishing entirely, and humanity goes right back to business as usual, making itself not ready for the next one. Gates wants governments and private donors to fund a GERM team that will maintain constant vigilance and work continually to create better vaccines and treatments, and maintain the infrastructure to rapidly vaccinate the entire world's population within months of the next major outbreak. In the meantime, Gates wants to eliminate all the traditional infectious diseases that still kill millions of people, especially in the poorer parts of the world. Those are laudable goals and I hope something resembling Gate's plan comes to fruition. It's less clear what the largely powerless individual (waves hand) can do, however. If a million people read this book and want to vote for the GERM team, they're a drop in the electoral bucket. And now for some criticisms. Fortunately I won't be calling out any typos, since I didn't find any. When your net worth is north of $100B you can afford the best proofreaders. Or maybe Gates himself is that good. I only spotted one claim that seems to be a factual error: "Just as it’s important to keep taking antibiotics for a bacterial disease even when you start feeling better, [...]" According to Paul A. Offit in chapter 2 of his book Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, finishing the antibiotic course is often unnecessary and may even contribute to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. I'm surprised none of Gates' many reviewers caught this one. Elsewhere Gates shares his fears of bioterrorists creating a pathogen engineered to spread rapidly and defeat existing vaccines and drugs, creating a pandemic worse than COVID-19. Even though I'm probably as pessimistic about humankind as a human can be, I'm skeptical about that one. For starters, terrorists have always preferred methods that result in dead bodies littering the streets, where they can be photographed and published in mass media to generate maximum terror. You don't have to kill a lot of people to get on the front page, and terrorists seem to be after publicity and shock value above all else. In contrast, when people die of diseases it's usually in hospitals or in their homes, and societies have strong systems of medical privacy and censorship to keep those images out of the news. Medical workers and first responders see the results; the general public, not so much. Diseases don't typically result in severed limbs, mangled bodies, and blood everywhere, the kinds of images that human brains seem wired to respond to. (Although Ebola does produce the blood and fluids, it kills people too quickly to spread far.) Another problem for engineered bioweapons is their nonspecificity. Terrorists usually want to target a particular group: people of a certain nationality, faith, political persuasion, and so on. Even if genetic engineering could produce a pathogen that targets only people with certain genetic markers (such as people of a particular race or ethnicity or even one family), as soon as the pathogen gets into the wild, it begins evolving. Nature takes command and the pathogen's future becomes unpredictable. It might evolve to attack people with other genetic markers, or everybody. So the bioterrorists might end up wiping out themselves or whatever group they think they are trying to help. In contrast, traditional terror tools such as bombs are highly targetable. Explosives are also cheaper, quicker, and far more available than biolabs. So while I can't rule out the risk entirely, it seems unlikely to me that anyone with the right combination of skills, motives, and patience will engineer and release a bioweapon to rival the pathogens that Nature already serves up. Just to work with such dangerous pathogens requires expensive biohazard containment facilities. What would be the point, when for the same money a terrorist organization could carry out thousands of traditional bombings? Besides, we've seen from COVID-19 that if you want to kill half a million Americans, you don't need to create a new virus. All you have to do is flood social media with disinformation, which will be believed by susceptible people. And that segues to my main criticism of Gates' otherwise excellent book: his minimal mention of the psychological aspects of the pandemic. Gates acknowledges disinformation in several places, including the part that targets him personally. His response: "I’ve decided that the best way forward is to just keep doing the work and believe that the truth will outlive the lies." The irony is obvious: Gates began his career with the goal of putting a computer on every desktop. Job done, and more, with a computing device in every pocket now, but I wonder if Gates ever dreamed what would happen when engineers made computers easy enough for everyone to use. I'm guessing he didn't, perhaps because of the psychologist's fallacy, the common error of assuming everyone else thinks similarly to oneself. In several parts of the book, Gates describes the people he hangs out with as "smart" or "talented." Given Gates' own exceptionally high intelligence and the social phenomenon of cognitive sorting, most of the people around him are probably similarly smart. The average person probably has a near-zero chance of getting face time with Gates. Everyone who gets near Gates has probably had to clear a number of cognitive and educational hurdles. The result is that Gates may not be fully aware of just how much less cognitive and critical thinking capacity the average person has to work with, not to mention the half of humankind that is below average. Although Gates mentions people who are studying the disinformation phenomenon (he cites On Immunity: An Inoculation), he doesn't seem to have read very far yet. I hope he will. As I mentioned in my pre-review of this book (archived here), at least in the USA, we've had essentially two different pandemics, before and after effective vaccines became widely available. In the first phase of the pandemic, nobody could get vaccinated and this exposed painful health inequalities, with "essential" workers, poor people, persons of color, and other vulnerable groups dying at higher rates. Then around April 2021, vaccine doses became abundant, and the second phase began: a pandemic of the (willfully) unvaccinated. The second phase has killed roughly the same number as the first phase, around half a million and counting, with the great majority of COVID deaths in the last year being readily preventable. The real bioweapon now isn't the engineered virus that Gates fears, but rather the engineered disinformation flooding social media that infects individuals who are susceptible to it. The problem that Gates rather naively hopes will go away by itself may prove to be durable. So what has science learned about people who fall for disinformation, often with lethal results? If you try talking to some of them, you might suspect they aren't the brightest bulbs on the tree. And according to peer-reviewed research, you'd usually be right. See for example Cognitive Ability and Vulnerability to Fake News and Pre-pandemic Cognitive Function and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Cohort Study. Gates doesn't seem to have read about the science of human differences (if he has, he's too polite or too politically correct to mention it). But given his interest in public health, he should read some cognitive epidemiology and perhaps invite experts in the field to his working dinners. I'd recommend Ian Deary, Russell T. Warne, Linda Gottfredson, Richard Haier, Stuart J. Ritchie, and Robert Plomin, among others. It might not be possible to eliminate all the health inequalities that Gates deplores, without first eliminating the cognitive inequalities that either cause or contribute to them. I hope Gates the voracious reader can squeeze in a few of these books: Born That Way: Genes, Behavior, Personality Intelligence: A Very Short Introduction (newer 2020 edition) Intelligence: All That Matters In the Know: Debunking 35 Myths about Human Intelligence The Neuroscience of Intelligence Blueprint: How DNA makes us who we are

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stabby

    Hopefully, Dr. Gates will write his next book in prison. The only thing worse than this narcissistic moron are the morons who are swallowing every word he says.

  8. 5 out of 5

    sharon storm

    all fluff and medical tyranny/fascism no studies or truth. Who would take health advice from a person who pushes the depopulation agenda?!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Horace Derwent

    i believe the author just loves this pandemic of covid virus and his bosses pretty appreciate in that, too i believe the author just loves this pandemic of covid virus and his bosses pretty appreciate in that, too

  10. 5 out of 5

    Olive Fellows (abookolive)

    Click here to hear my thoughts on this book over on my Booktube channel, abookolive! Click here to hear my thoughts on this book over on my Booktube channel, abookolive!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ben Rogers

    I found this a pretty good book on pandemics and prevention of major outbreaks. I quite enjoyed this. It reminded me of how preventable pandemics can actually be, when the right precautions are in place. I feel this is a must-read for people interested in risk management. Gates did a great job at detailing what occurred in 2019 and how things could have been taken more seriously. Parts of it saddend me, just because of how much certain things fell through with regards to COVID. Let's work togeth I found this a pretty good book on pandemics and prevention of major outbreaks. I quite enjoyed this. It reminded me of how preventable pandemics can actually be, when the right precautions are in place. I feel this is a must-read for people interested in risk management. Gates did a great job at detailing what occurred in 2019 and how things could have been taken more seriously. Parts of it saddend me, just because of how much certain things fell through with regards to COVID. Let's work together to make pandemics history! 4.6/5

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharifa

    Surprisingly So many fanboys of this ps*cho in the reviews. Oh yes,he has money. Nevertheless, his place is in the mental unit.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Please shoot me if I ever want to take pandemic advice from a guy who lobbied as hard as Gates did to keep Covid-19 vaccines out of the developing world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert Corey

    He can't even keep viruses out of my computer when I infrequently visit my adult websites and he thinks he's going to stop Coronavirus 19 🙄 He can't even keep viruses out of my computer when I infrequently visit my adult websites and he thinks he's going to stop Coronavirus 19 🙄

  15. 5 out of 5

    Razzmatazz

    I've never been this early to review a book :D I've never been this early to review a book :D

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trace Nichols

    Simply important. To the negative reviewers and nay-sayers.... and what are you contributing to our global society besides your negative thoughts and words that spread disinformation? Nada. Thank you Bill Gates for continuing to forge ahead with your research and funding in the fight for healthcare solutions that are accessible to all.... AND scientifically sound, medically achievable, and truly innovative.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Jeon

    I am incredibly frustrated with the extremely biased negative comments from Amazon reviews not even verified to have read the book itself. The majority of comments are about Bill Gates being incompetent, unrealistic and naive. I disagree. First, we cannot reject the fact that he has predicted a pandemic, correctly detailing the holes in the disease prevention system. Gates also has connections with the experts and has insider information about the issue. One review on Amazon said, "He should hav I am incredibly frustrated with the extremely biased negative comments from Amazon reviews not even verified to have read the book itself. The majority of comments are about Bill Gates being incompetent, unrealistic and naive. I disagree. First, we cannot reject the fact that he has predicted a pandemic, correctly detailing the holes in the disease prevention system. Gates also has connections with the experts and has insider information about the issue. One review on Amazon said, "He should have been stopped years ago but he has so much money all the taking heads around him don't have the balls to speak up" Amazon reviewers must realize he brings the greatest minds in conferences and allows their ideas to spread via his money. Please, don't make reviews without knowing the book or the man himself.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Book

    How to Prevent the Next Pandemic by Bill Gates “How to Prevent the Next Pandemic” is a practical approach on preventing pandemics. Bill Gates, provides readers with lessons learned from COVID-19 and what we can do to prevent a similar disaster. This useful 297-page book includes the following nine chapters: 1. Learn from COVID, 2. Create a pandemic prevention team, 3. Get better at detecting outbreaks early, 4. Help people protect themselves right away, 5. Find new treatments fast, 6. Get ready How to Prevent the Next Pandemic by Bill Gates “How to Prevent the Next Pandemic” is a practical approach on preventing pandemics. Bill Gates, provides readers with lessons learned from COVID-19 and what we can do to prevent a similar disaster. This useful 297-page book includes the following nine chapters: 1. Learn from COVID, 2. Create a pandemic prevention team, 3. Get better at detecting outbreaks early, 4. Help people protect themselves right away, 5. Find new treatments fast, 6. Get ready to make vaccines, 7. Practice, practice, practice, 8. Close the health gap between rich and poor countries, and 9. Make—and fund—a plan for preventing pandemics. Positives: 1. A professionally written book. It’s direct, and covers the most important aspects of a pandemic. 2. The fascinating topic of pandemics. 3. An easy book to follow. Gates does a great job of simplifying terms and focusing on the world of the possible. The tone is hopeful and positive. 4. A good use of charts and photos to complement the narrative. 5. The Introduction lays out what this book is about. “In this book you’ll read about some of these innovations, because great new products only do the most good if they reach the people who need them most—and in health, that often requires working with governments, which even in the poorest countries are nearly always the entities that provide public services.” 6. Describes the U.S. response to COVID-19. “The White House’s response in 2020 was disastrous. The president and his senior aides downplayed the pandemic and gave the public terrible advice. Incredibly, federal agencies refused to share data with one another.” 7. The government’s role. “It’s the government’s role to invest in the basic research that leads to major innovations, adopt policies that let new ideas flourish, and create markets and incentives (the way the United States accelerated vaccine work with Operation Warp Speed).” 8. Describes the importance of creating a Pandemic Prevention Team. “What we need is a well-funded global organization with enough full-time experts in all the necessary areas, the credibility and authority that come with being a public institution, and a clear remit to focus on preventing pandemics.” 9. Persuasive description on how to prepare for the next pandemic. “Ultimately, we need diagnostic tools that are accurate, accessible for many people around the world, and quick to produce results that feed into the public health system.” 10. Interesting findings disclosed. “Studies show that even though the COVID virus may be able to survive for a few hours, or even days, it’s quite rare for people to get sick from touching a contaminated surface. In fact, even if someone does happen to touch a fomite, the chances that the person will get infected are less than 1 in 10,000.” 11. What worked against COVID-19. “The real benefit comes with universal masking, where both people are double masking or improving the fit of their surgical masks: It reduces the risk of exposure by 96 percent. That’s an incredibly effective intervention that can be manufactured for just a few cents.” 12. Addresses misinformation. “Its director-general said, “We’re not just fighting an epidemic; we’re fighting an infodemic,” and its website began featuring a myth-busting section that had to be constantly updated in order to debunk false claims.” 13. Explains why the vaccine was successful against COVID-19. “Fortunately, COVID is relatively easy to target with a vaccine, partly because the spike on its surface is not as camouflaged as the proteins on some other viruses. That’s why the success rate for COVID vaccines has been unusually high.” 14. Describes vaccine hesitancy. “Many Black Americans, for example, are generally skeptical of the government’s good intentions when it comes to health, and understandably so. For forty years, the U.S. Public Health Service ran the infamous Tuskegee Study—a horrific experiment in which it looked at the effect of syphilis on hundreds of Black men, without giving them their true diagnosis, and even withholding treatment once it became available eleven years into the study.” 15. The six areas that should be priorities for funding and research. 16. Find out the biggest mistake in America. 17. How to close the health gap between rich and poor countries. “Created in 2002 to bolster the fight against HIV, TB, and malaria in low- and middle-income countries, the Global Fund has been a rousing success.” 18. Describes four priorities to eradicate respiratory diseases and prevent pandemics. “Ultimately, our goal should be to develop novel vaccines that fully protect against entire families of viruses, particularly respiratory viruses—that’s the key to eradicating flu and coronaviruses.” 19. Glossary provided. 20. Notes and links provided. Negatives: 1. No bibliography. In summary, I really enjoyed this book. Bill Gates provides readers with a practical approach on how to prevent pandemics. Gates’ passion on this topic and his reliance on subject matter experts provides readers with sound technical solutions to pandemics. His approach is hopeful and based on the best of our current knowledge. Overall, this is a very practical and useful book that will provide readers with hope. I highly recommend it. Further recommendations: “Preventing the Next Pandemic: Vaccine Diplomacy in a Time of Anti-Science” by Peter J. Hotez, “The Great Influenza” by John M. Barry, “Pandemic 1918” by Catharine Arnold, “Flu” by Gina Kolata, and “Influenza” by Jeremy Brown.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    Lesson learned? A good book. I read somewhere that thisxwas scaremongering, but I don't belive it is, granted I am not very good at seeing vested interests nit in the book, but all of alive right now have lived through, in are still feeling the effects of the Pandemic. Now would be a good time to think of the lessons learned and so we don't forget an something like this does not happen again. The book is does go through effects on the world and the information published in other countries, but it Lesson learned? A good book. I read somewhere that thisxwas scaremongering, but I don't belive it is, granted I am not very good at seeing vested interests nit in the book, but all of alive right now have lived through, in are still feeling the effects of the Pandemic. Now would be a good time to think of the lessons learned and so we don't forget an something like this does not happen again. The book is does go through effects on the world and the information published in other countries, but it does concentrate on the American response and resolution. Gates does got through the history to give a good account of lessons learned from not only this but other Pandemics. The problem is will we remember them as life starts to return to normal? Especially when it comes to having to invest real money in solutions that will hopefully not be needed for generations.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ruud

    "I Read Bill Gates' New Book (So You Don't Have To!)" Episode 418 of the Corbett Report. Thanks James! https://www.corbettreport.com/gatesbook/ "I Read Bill Gates' New Book (So You Don't Have To!)" Episode 418 of the Corbett Report. Thanks James! https://www.corbettreport.com/gatesbook/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Does he mean prevention as in containment or prevention as in not happening in the first place? If the latter, that assertion is plainly misleading and a little bit of clickbaity wishful thinking. Not sure why this is presented as such. Clearly, the topic is worth discussing without any additional spin. How to Mitigate the Next Pandemic? Now that is something that sounds like a good read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    Really interesting book. I think his plan is brilliant, unfortunately, our governments (not just the US) are really broken right now. So I think it will be hard to get his plans implemented. I think he has a great plan though. I love his information on the origin of mRNA which is the basis of several COVID-19 vaccines. I love the work his foundation is doing to improve world health. Excellent book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    The perfect recommendation for that friend or family member who starts off nearly every conversation regarding COVID with, "I just don't get how...". Unfortunately the author's name on the cover and spine may also need to be obscured before there is any chance those who would most benefit from this information could even begin to accept it. Similar to his approach in How To Avoid A Climate Disaster, Gates lays out a clear, concise, and easily digestible list of steps we can take globally, as wel The perfect recommendation for that friend or family member who starts off nearly every conversation regarding COVID with, "I just don't get how...". Unfortunately the author's name on the cover and spine may also need to be obscured before there is any chance those who would most benefit from this information could even begin to accept it. Similar to his approach in How To Avoid A Climate Disaster, Gates lays out a clear, concise, and easily digestible list of steps we can take globally, as well as locally, to avoid or mitigate the probability and effects of future pandemics, while at the same time providing a better quality of everyday life in the places it is needed most. I appreciate the way Gates employs an immense amount of stats and figures to support his conclusions, which adds to the ease with which his ideas and proposals can be understood by people with far less background knowledge, like me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fin Moorhouse

    Sane, comprehensive, charmingly wonkish overview of what we should learn from Covid. Nice to get a straightforward postmortem of the worst of the pandemic, and also to learn a bit more about how vaccines actually get developed and approved, different kinds of vaccines, plus hopes for cool future pharmaceutical interventions (e.g. pills instead of injections). Some sensible sounding suggestions: leaning into 'second-source deals', mechanisms for getting more vaccines to LIMCs, massively ramping u Sane, comprehensive, charmingly wonkish overview of what we should learn from Covid. Nice to get a straightforward postmortem of the worst of the pandemic, and also to learn a bit more about how vaccines actually get developed and approved, different kinds of vaccines, plus hopes for cool future pharmaceutical interventions (e.g. pills instead of injections). Some sensible sounding suggestions: leaning into 'second-source deals', mechanisms for getting more vaccines to LIMCs, massively ramping up response training exercises. Biggest and most intriguingly of all is proposal for an international team to monitor for outbreaks and coordinate a much more confident response. This book focused on preventing natural pandemics, and as such there was fairly little material on the risks from engineered pandemics. For what it's worth, these risks strikes me as potentially greater than the risks from natural pandemics over the next couple decades, and currently more neglected than risks from natural pandemics. Crossing my fingers for more books of this quality focused more squarely on engineered pandemics!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    I expect this book to be controversial. And really that's a shame, because it shouldn't be. I expect this book to generate divisive reviews on Goodreads including especially nasty ones, many that aren't from people who read the book. And again that's too bad. So what is this book? Think of it as a survey book. Where we are now, where we should go next. This is not a political book. It doesn't go into what the Trump administration or the Biden administration did or didn't do except at a very brief I expect this book to be controversial. And really that's a shame, because it shouldn't be. I expect this book to generate divisive reviews on Goodreads including especially nasty ones, many that aren't from people who read the book. And again that's too bad. So what is this book? Think of it as a survey book. Where we are now, where we should go next. This is not a political book. It doesn't go into what the Trump administration or the Biden administration did or didn't do except at a very brief and shallow basis. If you want that, read The Premonition: A Pandemic Story - which by the way - this book points you to. So why is Bill Gates the person to write this book? Sure he has the time and the money and brains. But also Public Health has been the main thrust of the Gates Foundation for years and years. So you say that Bill Gates in particular steered the world wrong with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine and patent rights - he doesn't answer that directly - though he does spend a lot of time talking about how hard it is to legally and safely manufacture a vaccine as separate from developing it. This part of the book feels like his answer. This book talks about some lucky finds, reuse of skills in different ways, mistakes that were made. But mostly it really is just talking about a way forward. Hopefully it will lead to conversations and leadership and investments and books by other people. It is not a great book. But it is well written and interesting and clear. And won't deserve the bull shit that it gets (is already getting).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rohan

    Work book for government and Big health authority. Reading this book give you a insight of thinking Big in achievable way . Bill always write books in a very clear manners. Thank you this knowledgeable , innovative and helpbook for great authority .

  27. 4 out of 5

    Simon Tudge

    Pretty interesting. Bill Gates has a skill for condensing a big topic into a concise and readable primer. After the last two years of reading the news I felt like many of the topics were actually fairly familiar, but there were still some new ideas scattered around.

  28. 4 out of 5

    So

    Look… Billy is a billionaire and very powerful. That means he’s Very Smart. He’s had a vested interest in Pharmaceuticals and Vaccines for years, because he is smart and knows humanity needs them otherwise we’d all be dead right now without the help of vaccines and medications!!! He knew this would happen! Because… He is very smart and rich and powerful, so that means he has your best interest in mind, so just listen to him. All your dreams wants needs and desires will be taken care off! We don’ Look… Billy is a billionaire and very powerful. That means he’s Very Smart. He’s had a vested interest in Pharmaceuticals and Vaccines for years, because he is smart and knows humanity needs them otherwise we’d all be dead right now without the help of vaccines and medications!!! He knew this would happen! Because… He is very smart and rich and powerful, so that means he has your best interest in mind, so just listen to him. All your dreams wants needs and desires will be taken care off! We don’t need power or choice. That’s best left for those more intelligent. Stop the playa hatin and get your consciousness uploaded into an AI, and your bi weekly vaccines today! 10 Stars highly recommend. Self Sovereignty is overrated.

  29. 4 out of 5

    José Calvo

    The book is actually interesting, but I don't get what a normal person (and not a government official) should do with it. The book is actually interesting, but I don't get what a normal person (and not a government official) should do with it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hazel

    While this book is cute, Gates is coming from an incredibly privileged standpoint. What was his motivation in writing this book? To inspire our youth to take care of what our elders couldn't? To take care of what rich billionaires cannot solve with their billions, and yet perceive to be able to solve the problem by writing a book on which you can make more millions ? It's said that there are no ethical billionaires, and I standby this. While Gates maybe has done more than the other evil billionai While this book is cute, Gates is coming from an incredibly privileged standpoint. What was his motivation in writing this book? To inspire our youth to take care of what our elders couldn't? To take care of what rich billionaires cannot solve with their billions, and yet perceive to be able to solve the problem by writing a book on which you can make more millions ? It's said that there are no ethical billionaires, and I standby this. While Gates maybe has done more than the other evil billionaires out there, doing this small effort should not be enough to absolve his white man billionaire guilt. To be fair, I actually really enjoyed a lot of the content in this novel. But the bottom line is that we have to wonder Gates had motivation on the subject to begin with. He's not doing everything he can for sure pandemics, or for global warming. He lives in custom made houses worth millions,while writing this novel to absolve his guilt.

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