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Growing up in a Korean Kitchen: A Cookbook

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Part memoir and part cookbook, GROWING UP IN A KOREAN KITCHEN is one woman's cultural and culinary story, weaving childhood reminiscences with lovingly gathered recipes. With descriptions of the traditional Korean kitchen, preparations for special feast days, and the rituals of everyday family meals, author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall draws an engaging portrait of a seldom glim Part memoir and part cookbook, GROWING UP IN A KOREAN KITCHEN is one woman's cultural and culinary story, weaving childhood reminiscences with lovingly gathered recipes. With descriptions of the traditional Korean kitchen, preparations for special feast days, and the rituals of everyday family meals, author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall draws an engaging portrait of a seldom glimpsed way of life. Easy-to-follow recipes, largely handed down through oral tradition, cover the wide range of main and side dishes, from the sumptuous elegance of "royal cuisine" to simpler countryside cooking. Korean cuisine has emerged as one of the most exciting and robust tastes of Asia, with great variety and some of the world's most sophisticated techniques for pickling and cooking with garlic and hot pepper. Cooks of all levels, as well as armchair travelers, will welcome this book to their collection.• Includes over 250 authentic recipes, a glossary, and a list of resources for finding uniquely Korean ingredients and utensils.• Illustrated with the author's travel and family photos, depicting the cultural and culinary traditions of Korea.For a list of markets that carry Korean ingredients visit www.koreanfeast.com


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Part memoir and part cookbook, GROWING UP IN A KOREAN KITCHEN is one woman's cultural and culinary story, weaving childhood reminiscences with lovingly gathered recipes. With descriptions of the traditional Korean kitchen, preparations for special feast days, and the rituals of everyday family meals, author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall draws an engaging portrait of a seldom glim Part memoir and part cookbook, GROWING UP IN A KOREAN KITCHEN is one woman's cultural and culinary story, weaving childhood reminiscences with lovingly gathered recipes. With descriptions of the traditional Korean kitchen, preparations for special feast days, and the rituals of everyday family meals, author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall draws an engaging portrait of a seldom glimpsed way of life. Easy-to-follow recipes, largely handed down through oral tradition, cover the wide range of main and side dishes, from the sumptuous elegance of "royal cuisine" to simpler countryside cooking. Korean cuisine has emerged as one of the most exciting and robust tastes of Asia, with great variety and some of the world's most sophisticated techniques for pickling and cooking with garlic and hot pepper. Cooks of all levels, as well as armchair travelers, will welcome this book to their collection.• Includes over 250 authentic recipes, a glossary, and a list of resources for finding uniquely Korean ingredients and utensils.• Illustrated with the author's travel and family photos, depicting the cultural and culinary traditions of Korea.For a list of markets that carry Korean ingredients visit www.koreanfeast.com

30 review for Growing up in a Korean Kitchen: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    There are too many Korean cookbooks out there that are written in English. Most of them aren't worth the paper they are printed on or the number of bytes it took to make them eBooks. This one is an exception. It's clear, precise and it gives you great hints. I mean, would I have thought to take drained, blanched spinach that I had squeezed water out of in my hands and roll it in paper towels to squeeze even more water out of it? No, But Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall did and she told me about it. As a r There are too many Korean cookbooks out there that are written in English. Most of them aren't worth the paper they are printed on or the number of bytes it took to make them eBooks. This one is an exception. It's clear, precise and it gives you great hints. I mean, would I have thought to take drained, blanched spinach that I had squeezed water out of in my hands and roll it in paper towels to squeeze even more water out of it? No, But Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall did and she told me about it. As a result, I can make Sigumch'i namul (seasoned spinach) that is as good as my wife's was. I love this cookbook and it allows me to replicate dishes my wife made. I'm in the process of reviewing the Korean cookbooks I have and continuing to experiment with Korean food. I keep coming back to this book because it is the best by far. Unlike other cookbooks it's precision and attention to detail makes it in my not so humble opinion the best. There is no attempt to dumb down or 'Americanize' the recipes or instructions. If my Korean born wife (Cholla Nam do girl) were still alive this is the kind of cookbook she would have written or rather it is the kind of cookbook she would have directed me to write. (December 10, 2012) ... As I review the other Korean cookbooks I own I realize that this one is by far the best.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Foxthyme

    Okay, so I go to this Korean restaurant for supper. It's home style cooking themed. I've never been before, however, I am a massive kim chi fan. When the food is served, a multiple array of pickles dishes were served with, which was like expansive and amazing variations on kim chi, as well as diversified into mushrooms and various other assorted vegetables and fungi. This hooked me on Korean food, so I ordered a couple of cookbooks. Discovering Korean Cuisine edited by Allisa Park and Growing Up Okay, so I go to this Korean restaurant for supper. It's home style cooking themed. I've never been before, however, I am a massive kim chi fan. When the food is served, a multiple array of pickles dishes were served with, which was like expansive and amazing variations on kim chi, as well as diversified into mushrooms and various other assorted vegetables and fungi. This hooked me on Korean food, so I ordered a couple of cookbooks. Discovering Korean Cuisine edited by Allisa Park and Growing Up in a Korean Kitchen by Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall. I am going to duplicate this review with both books, so bear with me. I adore Discovering Korean Cuisine. I'm a big fan of excellent visuals with good clean easy-to-figure out recipes. And if you are into kim chi, this gives you a number of recipes to work with for kim chi and various other pickles and side dishes. But there's definitely more than just kim chi, there are numerous other great traditional recipes and great pics of. Korean dishes are lovely in that all the food can be added to a dish, but in distinctly separate and equally spaced portions that are visually appealing. Take a gander at Google Images of Korean Food: http://www.google.ca/search?client=sa... Growing Up In a Korean Kitchen This book has less visuals and the pics shown are black and white OR black and white with a hint of orange added. But, no matter, this is still an excellent book. The amount of description that goes into the recipes, not overdone, but really letting you know that the author is in the know. If I had to choose? I couldn't, I'd say get both!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dray

    I liked this book quite a bit. Korean food is a recently acquired taste for me and like many Asian cuisines, it has a long and glorious history, codified into the national culture and customs. This cookbook does a good job of presenting mostly traditional recipes. Well worth reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    I first heard about the book from another book, The Art of Fermentation. So I decided to give this a try both because I love Korean food and also because I'm super interested in learning how to ferment food. I loved this cookbook.  Not only was it a super interesting memoir, but it also has so many recipes that I want to try. From whole meals to making your own soy sauce, this book has everything you could want to start making Korean food. So far I've only made the kimchi, but it was amazing and I first heard about the book from another book, The Art of Fermentation. So I decided to give this a try both because I love Korean food and also because I'm super interested in learning how to ferment food. I loved this cookbook.  Not only was it a super interesting memoir, but it also has so many recipes that I want to try. From whole meals to making your own soy sauce, this book has everything you could want to start making Korean food. So far I've only made the kimchi, but it was amazing and I hope to make more recipes soon.  I loved the insights to meal prepping and the details about her family, it added so much to the book. It was fun to learn about Korean culture as well as food! This is a book I need to own someday. I gave it five stars on Goodreads. 

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Two things inspired me to pick up this book: my love for Korean dramas, and my recent change to a diet rich in fermented foods. This cookbook satisfies both of those curiosities, although I doubt I will be able to make very many of these recipes. The family stories and introduction to the culture and heritage of food in Korea were fascinating to me. I love that she included so much about each food and when it might be eaten. It's part of the reason I read every single recipe, looking for those sp Two things inspired me to pick up this book: my love for Korean dramas, and my recent change to a diet rich in fermented foods. This cookbook satisfies both of those curiosities, although I doubt I will be able to make very many of these recipes. The family stories and introduction to the culture and heritage of food in Korea were fascinating to me. I love that she included so much about each food and when it might be eaten. It's part of the reason I read every single recipe, looking for those special notes. Since I am neither Korean nor living in Korea, much of this food is inaccessible to me. It seems to be the type of cooking and living that is passed down from generation to generation and not easy to jump into. For instance, keeping a pad for crocks for fermented food. Where in the world would I put something like this in or near my home? I have no idea, but it seems to be a necessary part of creating so many of these sauces and foods. I also would have enjoyed pictures of each food. This is an excellent cookbook, though. The steamed rice recipes look doable and delicious, and her step-by-step instructions for making kimchi make it seem possible for me. I'm just happy that so much of the culture was explained so clearly. It makes me appreciate the Korean dramas that much more. :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    False

    She is writing for a non-Korean readership, yet the recipes were alien and needs special ingredients to a T. I live where these things would be available,and yet I still didn't want to bother. Would you want to buy seven ingredients/spices/sauces just to make one dish? Do you really want to make your own soy sauce? Or seven variants? No. I couldn't find one recipe I even wanted to bother with. If she was going for a memoir-historical cooking book this would work. As a standard tool in your repet She is writing for a non-Korean readership, yet the recipes were alien and needs special ingredients to a T. I live where these things would be available,and yet I still didn't want to bother. Would you want to buy seven ingredients/spices/sauces just to make one dish? Do you really want to make your own soy sauce? Or seven variants? No. I couldn't find one recipe I even wanted to bother with. If she was going for a memoir-historical cooking book this would work. As a standard tool in your repetoire? No.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greymalkin

    I don't know that I will cook much out of this except maybe the kimchi recipes but I did enjoy all the stories and descriptions of what life was like back then for her family. I wish that there were more stories actually, and fewer recipes. I also really wish there were better pictures. I don't know that I will cook much out of this except maybe the kimchi recipes but I did enjoy all the stories and descriptions of what life was like back then for her family. I wish that there were more stories actually, and fewer recipes. I also really wish there were better pictures.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    amazing recipes, some are more involved than others, but lots of dishes just as good, ok almost as good as my mom's.. jap chae a big hit, going to try the homemade dumplings soon amazing recipes, some are more involved than others, but lots of dishes just as good, ok almost as good as my mom's.. jap chae a big hit, going to try the homemade dumplings soon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben Lyons

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sue Hollis

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bmarck240

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ari

  14. 5 out of 5

    H H

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hafsa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yuni Lee

  17. 4 out of 5

    alcatra

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Mcmullen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan Proctor

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hecocixi

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eitherway

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ji-Yeon Yuh

  25. 4 out of 5

    Roreev

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alpecr

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elisse

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ness

  29. 5 out of 5

    Diana Rhee

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hellshoes

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