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An Honest Living

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A sharp and stylish debut from the editor-in-chief of CrimeReads in which an unwitting private eye gets caught up in a crime of obsession between a reclusive literary superstar and her bookseller husband, paying homage to the noir genre just as smartly as it reinvents it After leaving behind the comforts and the shackles of a prestigious law firm, a restless attorney ma A sharp and stylish debut from the editor-in-chief of CrimeReads in which an unwitting private eye gets caught up in a crime of obsession between a reclusive literary superstar and her bookseller husband, paying homage to the noir genre just as smartly as it reinvents it After leaving behind the comforts and the shackles of a prestigious law firm, a restless attorney makes ends meet in mid-2000s Brooklyn by picking up odd jobs from a colorful assortment of clients. When a mysterious woman named Anna Reddick turns up at his apartment with ten thousand dollars in cash and asks him to track down her missing husband Newton, an antiquarian bookseller who she believes has been pilfering rare true crime volumes from her collection, he trusts it will be a quick and easy case. But when the real Anna Reddick--a magnetic but unpredictable literary prodigy--lands on his doorstep with a few bones to pick, he finds himself out of his depth, drawn into a series of deceptions involving Joseph Conrad novels, unscrupulous booksellers, aspiring fl�neurs, and seedy real estate developers. Set against the backdrop of New York at the tail end of the analog era and immersed in the worlds of literature and bookselling, An Honest Living is a gripping story of artistic ambition, obsession, and the small crimes we commit against one another every day.


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A sharp and stylish debut from the editor-in-chief of CrimeReads in which an unwitting private eye gets caught up in a crime of obsession between a reclusive literary superstar and her bookseller husband, paying homage to the noir genre just as smartly as it reinvents it After leaving behind the comforts and the shackles of a prestigious law firm, a restless attorney ma A sharp and stylish debut from the editor-in-chief of CrimeReads in which an unwitting private eye gets caught up in a crime of obsession between a reclusive literary superstar and her bookseller husband, paying homage to the noir genre just as smartly as it reinvents it After leaving behind the comforts and the shackles of a prestigious law firm, a restless attorney makes ends meet in mid-2000s Brooklyn by picking up odd jobs from a colorful assortment of clients. When a mysterious woman named Anna Reddick turns up at his apartment with ten thousand dollars in cash and asks him to track down her missing husband Newton, an antiquarian bookseller who she believes has been pilfering rare true crime volumes from her collection, he trusts it will be a quick and easy case. But when the real Anna Reddick--a magnetic but unpredictable literary prodigy--lands on his doorstep with a few bones to pick, he finds himself out of his depth, drawn into a series of deceptions involving Joseph Conrad novels, unscrupulous booksellers, aspiring fl�neurs, and seedy real estate developers. Set against the backdrop of New York at the tail end of the analog era and immersed in the worlds of literature and bookselling, An Honest Living is a gripping story of artistic ambition, obsession, and the small crimes we commit against one another every day.

30 review for An Honest Living

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    A Honest Living by Dwyer Murphy is a big disappointment. The book starts off with a lawyer in Brooklyn and is supposed written in "noir style" It is only style and nothing more. The lawyer speaks in first person and we never learn his name. He does not notice that being paid in cash by his client who is pretending to be someone else could be a red flag that the deal is not legit. A woman starts living with him in his apartment and I have no clue why. He talks of obsure pamplets and books endless A Honest Living by Dwyer Murphy is a big disappointment. The book starts off with a lawyer in Brooklyn and is supposed written in "noir style" It is only style and nothing more. The lawyer speaks in first person and we never learn his name. He does not notice that being paid in cash by his client who is pretending to be someone else could be a red flag that the deal is not legit. A woman starts living with him in his apartment and I have no clue why. He talks of obsure pamplets and books endlessly. The lawyer discusses a film noir, A Touch of Evil, making fun of the casting of Charlton Heston as a Mexican. I looked up the film and found thqt Orson Wells had one of the actressess darken her hair and eyebrows with black shoe polish. The movie seems more interesting to me than this book. The book was irritatingly tangential. Not a book for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Hmmmmmm, I was sooooooo looking forward to An Honest Living. I thought it would be my book of the summer. I’m an epic noir fan and a book labeled as reinventing noir, also set around my haunts in Brooklyn, how could it not work for me? The first person narration was a huge bummer. It’s like sitting down at Goldie’s Bar and having the neighborhood drunk plop next to you and ramble out every detail of a loooooong self-involved story. It created a huge distance from the reader, and I felt allowed t Hmmmmmm, I was sooooooo looking forward to An Honest Living. I thought it would be my book of the summer. I’m an epic noir fan and a book labeled as reinventing noir, also set around my haunts in Brooklyn, how could it not work for me? The first person narration was a huge bummer. It’s like sitting down at Goldie’s Bar and having the neighborhood drunk plop next to you and ramble out every detail of a loooooong self-involved story. It created a huge distance from the reader, and I felt allowed the author to be overly self-indulgent with look-at-how-clever-I-am references to films and books. Not clever at all. Like Brooklyn hipsters, there’s lots of style here, but it doesn’t lead anywhere. I never really felt like I was anywhere in particular. Coulda been Greenpoint, could have been Bucktown in Chicago. Naming places in Brooklyn isn’t the same as capturing the feeling of being in Brooklyn. This is where first person narration real fails, it’s incredibly hard to create atmosphere or a sense of place. The mystery was actually clever, interesting and felt different from a lot of things I’ve seen before, but there’s too much random stuff crammed around it and way too much telling to enjoy it. I’m still trying to figure out how it “reinvents” noir. It definitely imitates noir, but reinvents, nah.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller

    AN HONEST LIVING easily could be considered somewhat autobiographical. Dwyer Murphy practiced law at the New York City firm of Debevoise & Plimpton before leaving to become editor-in-chief of CrimeReads, one of the most popular websites for devotees of crime, mystery and detective works. The lead character in Murphy’s narrative is also an attorney, who left a large law firm to go it alone in the mid-2000s. He practices law in Brooklyn, working with a variety of unique and eccentric clients whose AN HONEST LIVING easily could be considered somewhat autobiographical. Dwyer Murphy practiced law at the New York City firm of Debevoise & Plimpton before leaving to become editor-in-chief of CrimeReads, one of the most popular websites for devotees of crime, mystery and detective works. The lead character in Murphy’s narrative is also an attorney, who left a large law firm to go it alone in the mid-2000s. He practices law in Brooklyn, working with a variety of unique and eccentric clients whose experiences provide readers with an entertaining journey through the environs of the Big Apple. The unnamed attorney remarks at one point, “All lawyers tend to have a condition. They suffer from it like a disease, and it has to do with believing they can fix things or get to the bottom of them simply by talking to a lot of people.” He wanders through New York meeting a large cast of characters, including hustlers, writers, politicians and real-estate developers, all walking the fine line between honesty and crime. Reading the book is almost like having the author sitting next to you in a bar and after some opening conversation telling you about his work. It is quite a story. Murphy’s maiden novel begins with a reminder that lawyers often repeat when advising clients: “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” The attorney meets a woman named Anna Reddick, who seeks to retain his professional services to do some investigative work. Reddick is experiencing difficulties in her marriage. She believes that her husband is attempting to hide or dispose of marital assets, in this case some rare legal books. If the attorney can ferret out the plan, he will be paid a bonus in addition to the large retainer she is willing to pay. He successfully completes his work and receives the bonus, only to be met several days later by a different woman --- the real Anna Reddick. She wants to know how and why someone posed as her, deceiving not only the attorney but also her husband and herself. In an interview prior to the book’s release, Murphy acknowledged that no one takes a more cynical view of lawyers than they themselves do. For his part, Murphy admits to being slightly more jaundiced than the book’s narrator. He is not the Atticus Finch type, but more like Paul Newman’s character in The Verdict or Saul Goodman from “Better Call Saul.” For these fictional lawyers, professional cynicism is prevalent. Still, many of the cases that the main character handles in AN HONEST LIVING are based on Murphy’s actual work as a lawyer, including my favorite --- a dispute between two major financial institutions that want to own the rights to the color black. Sprinkled throughout are mentions of recognized works of literature, film and a few cameo appearances of well-known New Yorkers. Sometimes the references meld into the plot, and other times they just appear to add to the New York noir of the novel. Regardless of the reasons for their inclusion, they are clever and smoothly written. Reading a debut always raises questions for readers. What about sequels? Murphy tells us that one is in the works. It will be set in Miami, with characters “running around talking about books and movies and dancing and occasionally somebody is killed or badly hurt and all of them dream of obscure lawsuits.” I hope that some members of the supporting cast will stick around for the follow-up. It also would be nice if Murphy’s attorney had a name; it would make reading and writing about him that much more enjoyable if he did. Reviewed by Stuart Shiffman

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    As someone who lived and played in and around Brooklyn for most of the early aughts, this book was, amongst other things, a nice little trip down memory lane. It evokes that short, singular period of time, after 9/11 but before the prevalence of smart phones, where the city seemed poised between two worlds, a liminal period of transition between eras. The book is an engaging mystery but it balances this expertly with a laid-back, fun, "stoner noir" vibe that is absolutely a blast to spend some t As someone who lived and played in and around Brooklyn for most of the early aughts, this book was, amongst other things, a nice little trip down memory lane. It evokes that short, singular period of time, after 9/11 but before the prevalence of smart phones, where the city seemed poised between two worlds, a liminal period of transition between eras. The book is an engaging mystery but it balances this expertly with a laid-back, fun, "stoner noir" vibe that is absolutely a blast to spend some time with. It loves books, movies, and bars-- like all good Brooklyn hipsters-- and the specificity of its references to NYC institutions and culture prove its bona fides. A must-read for anyone who has ever complained that they loved something when it was still underground-- and I mean that in the most loving, generous way possible. =)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    Oh this sounds very fun. From an interview on Study Hall: A smartly updated literary noir set in pre-financial crisis Manhattan. It’s suffused not only with risk-taking and critical thinking, but with Murphy’s generosity of spirit. The novel is playful and welcoming, coaching the reader to think the best of its cast of oddballs and misfits — a lawyer who hates lawyers; a wealthy, successful novelist who can’t stand writing fiction; a suite of elderly book collectors — who the novel treats with em Oh this sounds very fun. From an interview on Study Hall: A smartly updated literary noir set in pre-financial crisis Manhattan. It’s suffused not only with risk-taking and critical thinking, but with Murphy’s generosity of spirit. The novel is playful and welcoming, coaching the reader to think the best of its cast of oddballs and misfits — a lawyer who hates lawyers; a wealthy, successful novelist who can’t stand writing fiction; a suite of elderly book collectors — who the novel treats with empathy and humor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Wilson

    Imagine if Better Call Saul was written by Ray Bradbury and directed by Wes Anderson.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    This book was not for me, but the author does have talent for this particular genre which is noir fiction. The plot has a couple of good twists, but just not enough for me. Many characters are introduced, and I had to make a list of all of their names and the pages when they appeared in case I needed to revert back to them. As it turned out, most of them were unimportant, but some were significant. The setting is in Brooklyn, and I understand that the author describes Brooklyn as it really is, a This book was not for me, but the author does have talent for this particular genre which is noir fiction. The plot has a couple of good twists, but just not enough for me. Many characters are introduced, and I had to make a list of all of their names and the pages when they appeared in case I needed to revert back to them. As it turned out, most of them were unimportant, but some were significant. The setting is in Brooklyn, and I understand that the author describes Brooklyn as it really is, and that would be important to anyone who is familiar with Brooklyn. I was just expecting something more from reading this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dewey

    Nails neo-noir style. The sentences are crisp and filled with Marlowe-like observations. The plot, with its focus on rare book collecting and references to literary works, is probably in sweet spot for serial readers. The highlight of the book for me was the "inconceivable" aside in the movie theater where the author trolls some other theater goers. Despite its nailing of the style and intriguing plot, the book kind of trails off with the falling action scene leaving me wondering what two charac Nails neo-noir style. The sentences are crisp and filled with Marlowe-like observations. The plot, with its focus on rare book collecting and references to literary works, is probably in sweet spot for serial readers. The highlight of the book for me was the "inconceivable" aside in the movie theater where the author trolls some other theater goers. Despite its nailing of the style and intriguing plot, the book kind of trails off with the falling action scene leaving me wondering what two characters were doing without giving enough breadcrumbs to make strong inferences. Maybe I'm just dense, but just because the Big Sleep was incomprehensible in the end doesn't mean that every noir-adjacent book can or should aim for similar levels of abstruse plot points.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    My review for this novel was published by Library Journal in May 2022: An impressive debut noir from the CrimeReads website’s editor-in-chief. In mid-2000s Brooklyn, a disillusioned lawyer gets by with any odd jobs thrown his way, including a quick $10,000 payday involving one Anna Reddick, who asks him to dig up some dirt on her much older husband Newton, a rare book dealer who she claims sold off valuable titles from the family collection to fund their divorce. Easy enough, until the real Anna My review for this novel was published by Library Journal in May 2022: An impressive debut noir from the CrimeReads website’s editor-in-chief. In mid-2000s Brooklyn, a disillusioned lawyer gets by with any odd jobs thrown his way, including a quick $10,000 payday involving one Anna Reddick, who asks him to dig up some dirt on her much older husband Newton, a rare book dealer who she claims sold off valuable titles from the family collection to fund their divorce. Easy enough, until the real Anna Reddick, a celebrated novelist, shows up on the lawyer’s doorstep looking for the man who slandered her husband. Who set him up, and where is Newton now? To answer those questions, the unnamed protagonist is drawn into a world of antiquarian booksellers, among other quintessential New York characters, as well as the world of the elusive, brilliant woman who’s spending more and more time at his apartment. VERDICT Murphy’s writing is smart, ruminative, and referential. His narrator knows he’s in a story that mirrors the plot of the film Chinatown, and though the mystery itself is light on twists, it’s all worth it for this lovingly rendered snapshot of an already-bygone city, with details reeking of authenticity, down to the last barstool.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    The best kind of private eye novel - one that feels wholly modern but timeless at the same time. Murphy evokes the greats like Elmore Leonard and George Higgins without losing his own, sharp voice. A stylish, memorable debut.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sandie

    Dwyer Murphy, a law school grad and editor at CrimeReads, turns his clear fondness for books, literary and film noir, and New York City into a delightful and stylish first novel narrated by a young Brooklyn lawyer. Our narrator ekes out a living helping struggling artists and poets and an amiable fence with their legal problems until a legal referal from his best friend, Latin immigrant and poet Ulises, brings him a case involving a lovely and rich novelist, her much older husband, and some murd Dwyer Murphy, a law school grad and editor at CrimeReads, turns his clear fondness for books, literary and film noir, and New York City into a delightful and stylish first novel narrated by a young Brooklyn lawyer. Our narrator ekes out a living helping struggling artists and poets and an amiable fence with their legal problems until a legal referal from his best friend, Latin immigrant and poet Ulises, brings him a case involving a lovely and rich novelist, her much older husband, and some murder books which may or may not be worth a fortune. Before you can say Chinatown, our hapless hero has turned into a private eye and finds himself smitten and in legal jeopardy. An Honest Living is a quiet novel relying on good writing, several levels of nostalgia, and a nice sense of place. As I share Murphy's love of books, noir, and NYC, I am tempted to give him ***** for a very good read and his surprising but exhilarating ending. Elliot Gould's Philip Marlowe in Robert Altman's Raymond Chandler's The Long Good-bye makes a similar genre flipping choice.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cary

    DNF @ page 74 The premise sounded interesting, but the delivery was rambling and disjointed. There were so many unnecessary and irrelevant details. The character and the story seemed to meander aimlessly around NYC. What is this story and why am I reading it? I simply don't care anyone. DNF @ page 74 The premise sounded interesting, but the delivery was rambling and disjointed. There were so many unnecessary and irrelevant details. The character and the story seemed to meander aimlessly around NYC. What is this story and why am I reading it? I simply don't care anyone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Tunis

    An enjoyable and bookish noir.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This was not a long book but for me, dragged interminably. Too many characters, too slow, uneven pacing and an ending that seem to signal a sequel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    First Clue

    Take a trip back to early 2000s Brooklyn in this work of literary noir that lurks on the edges of the art world. Noir novels present an investigator who’s down on his or her luck, and here it’s Dwyer Murphy—yes, the main character has the same name as the author—a former corporate lawyer who couldn’t take the hours, the billing in six-minute increments, or the colleagues. Now he’s going it alone, but he needs the odd lucrative job (even the odd shady one) to stay afloat. He takes a sad case: one Take a trip back to early 2000s Brooklyn in this work of literary noir that lurks on the edges of the art world. Noir novels present an investigator who’s down on his or her luck, and here it’s Dwyer Murphy—yes, the main character has the same name as the author—a former corporate lawyer who couldn’t take the hours, the billing in six-minute increments, or the colleagues. Now he’s going it alone, but he needs the odd lucrative job (even the odd shady one) to stay afloat. He takes a sad case: one party in an acrimonious divorce wants him to try to buy books off her husband; she suspects that he’s selling some of her valuable, inherited volumes and needs the proof. Two things are strange: the “books” are esoteric, early American legal pamphlets such as “Confessions of Tom Mansfield who Corrupted and Murdered His Servant,” which Dwyer had no idea were collectibles, let alone worth taking risks over. And then he faces being sued by the wife because he’s ruining her husband’s reputation. There’s no end to the rich-people twistedness here, which is both incredible and all-too believable. That’s enjoyable enough, but best is the slow-burn, quirky trip with the steadfast Dwyer, who puts one foot in front of the other until he figures out what’s going on. A kinda, sorta Thelma-and-Louise ending caps the saga, but leaves room to wonder what’s next for the lovable Dwyer.—Henrietta Verma For more reviews of new crime fiction, subscribe to our weekly newsletter, First Clue: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/First...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I honestly expected more, based on Lit Hub and The Millions enthusiastic praise. I did enjoy it to a reasonable degree. Murphy can craft an engaging labyrinthine story, and it's obvious he owes a bit of gratitude to the plot of "Chinatown," which is even referenced here, but there is no tension, no palatable drama. The real star is New York City, which is rendered with marvelous detail - a veritable kaleidoscope of restaurants, diners, coffee houses, movie theaters, bars and parties that our int I honestly expected more, based on Lit Hub and The Millions enthusiastic praise. I did enjoy it to a reasonable degree. Murphy can craft an engaging labyrinthine story, and it's obvious he owes a bit of gratitude to the plot of "Chinatown," which is even referenced here, but there is no tension, no palatable drama. The real star is New York City, which is rendered with marvelous detail - a veritable kaleidoscope of restaurants, diners, coffee houses, movie theaters, bars and parties that our intrepid unnamed lawyer haunts in his investigation of what is exactly going on with a reclusive famous author and her much older unscrupulous bookseller husband. Murphy writes with deadpan noir finesse, but there is no sense of danger and conflict. The relationship between literary prodigy Anna Reddick - aka A.M. Byrne - and our out of his depth attorney, despite the fact they even sleep with each other at one point, is strictly a business transaction. Anna's husband, Newton, hardly registered with me, and when the final mystery/twist is revealed, it's a real letdown. Everyone just goes about their business with seeming indifference.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Kepesh

    This book reminded me a little of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy. (Yes, it is set in New York.) The protagonist talks about the city from pedestrian level--the rooftop film screening, and the art house screening, the coffee shop with free refills, the bagel shop with great coffee, the bar where you aren't allowed to dance but people do anyway, the bar where you aren't allowed to dance and get stopped roughly by the bouncer, the salty smell in August near the river, the Gatsbyesque mansion where This book reminded me a little of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy. (Yes, it is set in New York.) The protagonist talks about the city from pedestrian level--the rooftop film screening, and the art house screening, the coffee shop with free refills, the bagel shop with great coffee, the bar where you aren't allowed to dance but people do anyway, the bar where you aren't allowed to dance and get stopped roughly by the bouncer, the salty smell in August near the river, the Gatsbyesque mansion where the party goes on as its owner is about to be found dead in a far-away flophouse and his wife is in an upstairs room trying to get her authorial groove back. Accretion of detail is more important than the plot, though it bears a fairly strong resemblance to Chinatown and makes a point of saying so. It is a bookish book, about book collectors; it is a lawyerly book, with points of tax law and real estate law and copyright law sprinkled in like breadcrumbs for the story. First novel ending (petered out). But a book you can easily lose yourself in.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    If you’re in the market for self-conscious, hipster pastiche, look no further than An Honest Living. The narrator, who was also the author (really?), was like a sedated Holden Caulfield. I found myself reading even though that was the most uneventful and safe noir I’d ever read in my life. Literary crime... It’s unclear throughout why anyone really does anything they do. Holden feels an obligation to a man whose life he feels he inadvertently ruined, but why take part in such a seedy setup to be If you’re in the market for self-conscious, hipster pastiche, look no further than An Honest Living. The narrator, who was also the author (really?), was like a sedated Holden Caulfield. I found myself reading even though that was the most uneventful and safe noir I’d ever read in my life. Literary crime... It’s unclear throughout why anyone really does anything they do. Holden feels an obligation to a man whose life he feels he inadvertently ruined, but why take part in such a seedy setup to begin with? His guilt was a plot device. And the real Anna Reddick was just an aimless ghost. There were some obligatory remarks about gentrification thrown in, but no one seems to acknowledge that the people living in New York at the time were responsible for it themselves. I’m not sure this was better than your basic series. I guess throw in some superficial analysis about socioeconomic evolution and casual drug use and you’re one step ahead of the pack...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    This twists back on itself. The unnamed narrator who left corporate law to go it alone, finds himself with an odd case when he's hired by Anna Rennick to catch her almost ex-husband stealing her valuable books. Except she's not Anna Rennick. It's set in Brooklyn in 2005 (great atmospherics) and that perhaps is what makes this more entertaining than it otherwise might be because there are just a few too many threads. There's also good insight into the antiquarian book business. Thanks to Edelweis This twists back on itself. The unnamed narrator who left corporate law to go it alone, finds himself with an odd case when he's hired by Anna Rennick to catch her almost ex-husband stealing her valuable books. Except she's not Anna Rennick. It's set in Brooklyn in 2005 (great atmospherics) and that perhaps is what makes this more entertaining than it otherwise might be because there are just a few too many threads. There's also good insight into the antiquarian book business. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. I'd like to see more from Murphy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    AN HONEST LIVING is a shimmering, often surprising, exploration of how fact and #fiction reflect one another until the boundaries disappear. Read BookTrib's Full Review. AN HONEST LIVING is a shimmering, often surprising, exploration of how fact and #fiction reflect one another until the boundaries disappear. Read BookTrib's Full Review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ellison

    The living being made here is not actually honest but the narrator clearly wants the reader to believe he has nothing to hide - he's coming clean even if he isn't clean. Beautifully written. Looking forward to his next book. The living being made here is not actually honest but the narrator clearly wants the reader to believe he has nothing to hide - he's coming clean even if he isn't clean. Beautifully written. Looking forward to his next book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wisniewski

    I’d read the reviews (which are mixed) and decided to take a chance. I enjoyed it. It is not your typical mystery and maybe, in the end, that is what bothered others. My thought is this- life is messy and sometimes we need to look past some things to find what is really important.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marc Reynolds

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Enjoyable story, kept my attention throughout. However the ending seems to be in complete, like the author was planning to continue in a follow up book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aletha Pagett

    This is a noir that is new to me. I found the writing to be both excellent and unusual., the story a twisty plot set in NYC that keeps one reading. This was received from Goodreads.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I enjoyed the characters and pace of the story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jim Cullison

    Got halfway through and realized I’d been conned. Nothing happens in this book, and it takes an unforgivable shot at Chinatown.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Koplin

    Quirky book, not really a mystery but kind of? Good descriptions of nyc. Is a detective book, but he is a lawyer, and also only kind of a case. Still good read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Disappointing. I am a huge noir fan so that coupled with the glowing reviews made me anxious to read this. It’s slow, overdone and unsatisfying.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Sprout

    Love this main character. Very interesting story and beautifully written.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    (A few things: I recently moved to Nashville, Tennessee and have started working at Ann Patchett's independent bookstore, Parnassus Books. As a result, I will likely be doing a lot more reading going forward (most of which will be new and current releases) and I'm hoping to start utilizing my Goodreads more effectively as a result. So here goes...) *August Staff Recommendation* (3.5/5) This was a really interesting take on the well-established detective drama. By updating many of the trademarks of (A few things: I recently moved to Nashville, Tennessee and have started working at Ann Patchett's independent bookstore, Parnassus Books. As a result, I will likely be doing a lot more reading going forward (most of which will be new and current releases) and I'm hoping to start utilizing my Goodreads more effectively as a result. So here goes...) *August Staff Recommendation* (3.5/5) This was a really interesting take on the well-established detective drama. By updating many of the trademarks of the noir-adjacent story for the modern age, the author is allowed to cleverly subvert many tired tropes and imbue them with new life. The mystery at the core of the novel is certainly interesting, though I often found myself far more intrigued by the large cast of colorful characters that our protagonist encounters throughout. I think that the intentionally messy ending will rub some readers the wrong way, but for me it does a great job of really hammering home the fact that this isn't one of the pulpy detective stories you've seen or read a hundred times before.

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