Hot Best Seller

Enclave

Availability: Ready to download

From the critically acclaimed author of Terra Nullius comes a novel in the tradition of Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman that explores a future of surveillance, disruption and segregation that echoes the horrors of a colonial past. 'These are troubling times. The world is a dangerous place,' the voice of the Chairman said. 'I can continue to assure you of this: within the From the critically acclaimed author of Terra Nullius comes a novel in the tradition of Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman that explores a future of surveillance, disruption and segregation that echoes the horrors of a colonial past. 'These are troubling times. The world is a dangerous place,' the voice of the Chairman said. 'I can continue to assure you of this: within the Wall you are perfectly safe.' Christine could not sleep, she could not wake, she could not think. She stared, half-blind, at the cold screen of her smartphone. She was told the Agency was keeping them safe from the dangers outside, an outside world she would never see. She never imagined questioning what she was told, what she was allowed to know, what she was permitted to think. She never even thought there were questions to ask. The enclave was the only world she knew, the world outside was not safe. Staying or leaving was not a choice she had the power to make. But then Christine dared start thinking . . . and from that moment, danger was everywhere. In our turbulent times, Claire G. Coleman's Enclave is a powerful dystopian allegory that confronts the ugly realities of racism, homophobia, surveillance, greed and privilege and the self-destructive distortions that occur when we ignore our shared humanity.


Compare

From the critically acclaimed author of Terra Nullius comes a novel in the tradition of Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman that explores a future of surveillance, disruption and segregation that echoes the horrors of a colonial past. 'These are troubling times. The world is a dangerous place,' the voice of the Chairman said. 'I can continue to assure you of this: within the From the critically acclaimed author of Terra Nullius comes a novel in the tradition of Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman that explores a future of surveillance, disruption and segregation that echoes the horrors of a colonial past. 'These are troubling times. The world is a dangerous place,' the voice of the Chairman said. 'I can continue to assure you of this: within the Wall you are perfectly safe.' Christine could not sleep, she could not wake, she could not think. She stared, half-blind, at the cold screen of her smartphone. She was told the Agency was keeping them safe from the dangers outside, an outside world she would never see. She never imagined questioning what she was told, what she was allowed to know, what she was permitted to think. She never even thought there were questions to ask. The enclave was the only world she knew, the world outside was not safe. Staying or leaving was not a choice she had the power to make. But then Christine dared start thinking . . . and from that moment, danger was everywhere. In our turbulent times, Claire G. Coleman's Enclave is a powerful dystopian allegory that confronts the ugly realities of racism, homophobia, surveillance, greed and privilege and the self-destructive distortions that occur when we ignore our shared humanity.

30 review for Enclave

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gabi

    3.5 stars Claire G. Coleman is one of the authors I can blindly buy every novel of. Her writing style is perfect to my taste, her ability to create the feeling of silent oppression always makes me turning pages. The expectation of something going wrong is very addictive while reading. The same atmosphere is present in her latest novel. In a slow pace we get to know a seemingly perfect world of the rich and the beautiful, but in every scene the realisation of emptiness and uselessness shines throug 3.5 stars Claire G. Coleman is one of the authors I can blindly buy every novel of. Her writing style is perfect to my taste, her ability to create the feeling of silent oppression always makes me turning pages. The expectation of something going wrong is very addictive while reading. The same atmosphere is present in her latest novel. In a slow pace we get to know a seemingly perfect world of the rich and the beautiful, but in every scene the realisation of emptiness and uselessness shines through in glimpses. The slow buildup of the uncomfortable feeling held until nearly the end. Unfortunately said end felt way too rushed, too convenient. It was as if all the built up suspension was released in the way of a balloon with a hole. Instead of an explosion a flat feeling was left. Still the rest of the book gets under one's skin in Coleman's skillful ability to incorporate the oppressed first nation experience. The next book by Coleman will again be an instant buy for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    While this book had a somewhat slow start, I was intrigued right from the beginning. Enclave centre’s on Christine, a girl living in a walled-off city where something isn’t quite right and everything seems uniform, predictable, monotonous. But inside the wall, they’re safe. Right? Halfway through this book, the action really picks up and I was so gripped by Christine’s journey, just rooting for her to find her people and the life she deserves. I also absolutely was not expecting our MC to be a lesb While this book had a somewhat slow start, I was intrigued right from the beginning. Enclave centre’s on Christine, a girl living in a walled-off city where something isn’t quite right and everything seems uniform, predictable, monotonous. But inside the wall, they’re safe. Right? Halfway through this book, the action really picks up and I was so gripped by Christine’s journey, just rooting for her to find her people and the life she deserves. I also absolutely was not expecting our MC to be a lesbian which was a really pleasant surprise, and had I known, I would have included it in my pride reads! There’s also some side trans, nonbinary and other queer rep which I really appreciated. Queer diversity always makes my heart soar. Plus, who doesn’t love a dystopian novel, and an Aussie one at that? My only complaint is there were a few things I would have liked to have seen fleshed out more, like Christine’s relationship with her best friend before they went missing and what happened in the wastelands. Some of these things just felt a little too brushed over for my liking, but I do love me some intricate details. Trigger warnings for racism, homophobia and transphobia.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bookishlyfiction

    This is the first adult book I’ve read in a long time and I’m not sure if it’s the fact that the quality of YA fiction is so low or that this was just really good. Enclave centres around Christine of whom lives in a walled-in ‘enclave’ and doesn’t know what to do with herself now that she’s left uni and is struggling with the sudden disappearance of her best friend Jack. It has all of the themes of those books that you would typically read in high school. Racism, secretive governments, lgbtqia+ This is the first adult book I’ve read in a long time and I’m not sure if it’s the fact that the quality of YA fiction is so low or that this was just really good. Enclave centres around Christine of whom lives in a walled-in ‘enclave’ and doesn’t know what to do with herself now that she’s left uni and is struggling with the sudden disappearance of her best friend Jack. It has all of the themes of those books that you would typically read in high school. Racism, secretive governments, lgbtqia+ etc. It was just so much better, it was well written by giving the reader enough information to understand what was happening whilst having some mystery there as well. Overall I loved the writing style and just the general storytelling. I must say this definitely has the potential to become a modern classic (as someone who dislikes classics). Ages 16+ due to confronting and potentially triggering themes including depression, suicide and torture.

  4. 4 out of 5

    nina.reads.books

    Claire G. Coleman has written several books and I even own two of them but I this was the first one of hers I have read. Coleman writes and speaks extensively about the impacts of colonisation and her novels veer into dystopian and speculative fiction with a focus on Australian colonialism. In Enclave we are introduced to a dystopian vision of Australia where segregation and monitoring are the norm. Twenty one year old Christine is unhappy but doesn’t know how to change her life. Her world is com Claire G. Coleman has written several books and I even own two of them but I this was the first one of hers I have read. Coleman writes and speaks extensively about the impacts of colonisation and her novels veer into dystopian and speculative fiction with a focus on Australian colonialism. In Enclave we are introduced to a dystopian vision of Australia where segregation and monitoring are the norm. Twenty one year old Christine is unhappy but doesn’t know how to change her life. Her world is completely regimented but she has everything she could possibly need - a powerful family, unlimited money, black servants to provide everything they need at home. The staff are brought in on buses daily because Christine lives in Safetytown, safe within the walls of the enclave. And the all powerful Agency keeps them all safe. But safe from what? I liked the initial world building as it took a while to slowly find out what Christine's world was really like. This gave the first half of the book an unsettling feeling as you know that things are off but you don’t really know what is going on. I also thought the queer representation was excellent and introduced trans and non-binary characters in ways that I would not have expected. Towards the end the different characters and their relationships felt a little over simplified for me and almost felt more YA in delivery. The pacing was also a bit uneven for my taste. The set up and Christine's long journey to safety felt slow in comparison to the ending which moved a lot faster. But the enclave was such an interesting concept especially as it was set in Australia. Themes of racism, homophobia and big brother surveillance were threaded through. This was an allegory for the evil of our modern world with a nod towards the experiences of First Nations people in Australia. Overall I really enjoyed reading this. Dystopian novels are definitely my jam! Looking forward to reading both Terra Nullius and The Old Lie which are on my TBR shelf. Thank you to @hachetteaus for my #gifted copy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Searing speculative/dystopian fiction set in a near future South Eastern Australia where a high socioeconomic community unhappy with the changes in their world have created their own privately controlled city which protects their way of life. Inside the walls their every need is catered for and they are kept safe from the chaos of the outside world by The Agency. There is no reason to think about the world outside the walls; that is unless it all starts to feel suffocating for reasons you can’t Searing speculative/dystopian fiction set in a near future South Eastern Australia where a high socioeconomic community unhappy with the changes in their world have created their own privately controlled city which protects their way of life. Inside the walls their every need is catered for and they are kept safe from the chaos of the outside world by The Agency. There is no reason to think about the world outside the walls; that is unless it all starts to feel suffocating for reasons you can’t quite pin down. Christine, the 20 something daughter of a powerful man feels a sense of dread about the life laid out before her. What follows is the story of what happens if you feel you don’t fit the expectations of your community. A powerful allegory about the polarisation of our communities, the power of social media to further divide us and the structures that benefit from the control it brings them. As a dystopian novel this reads in extremes to deliver the point but many times the extremes felt all too possible. That we are already in gated communities, hemmed in by fear and metaphorical walls rather than physical ones.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jodie

    Enclave by Claire G. Coleman is breathtaking. One of the most intense and uniquely Australian dystopian novels I have ever read. The courage and strength of the main character Christine as her journey unfolds just ripped my heart out. The landscape is familiar yet not. The sky and shore line altered. But it cried out to my soul. I have seen Australian dystopian novels get a lot of press over the last few years and they have been seriously disappointing. This, this novel, deserves to be read, to Enclave by Claire G. Coleman is breathtaking. One of the most intense and uniquely Australian dystopian novels I have ever read. The courage and strength of the main character Christine as her journey unfolds just ripped my heart out. The landscape is familiar yet not. The sky and shore line altered. But it cried out to my soul. I have seen Australian dystopian novels get a lot of press over the last few years and they have been seriously disappointing. This, this novel, deserves to be read, to be shared, to hold a place on bookshelves. My copy wont be taking a trip to the second hand shop, it’s staying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was really looking forward to this book but it was kinda bad. The first third was incredibly slow, and then all of a sudden it’s like a bomb exploded and everything started happening. There was no build up and there was no suspense. I didn’t really get a sense of what was so bad or dangerous about this town other than there are cameras everywhere and your phone knows more than you want it to - which isn’t really that foreign a concept. There was no alluding to what would be so bad if she broke I was really looking forward to this book but it was kinda bad. The first third was incredibly slow, and then all of a sudden it’s like a bomb exploded and everything started happening. There was no build up and there was no suspense. I didn’t really get a sense of what was so bad or dangerous about this town other than there are cameras everywhere and your phone knows more than you want it to - which isn’t really that foreign a concept. There was no alluding to what would be so bad if she broke the rules or even what the rules were. The way the author described Christine’s interest in Sienna made it sound like it was purely an ‘exotic unknown’ interest rather than sexual desire. One of the most unrealistic parts was how on earth did this 21 year old mathematician who did nothing for herself survive after being exiled. In ~30 days she learned to trap, skin, and cook animals, build fires, avoid being spotted or captured by drones, fought off and killed a very large man intent on raping her, discovered spots to safely sleep, foraged for safe food. She has an innate sense of direction through the wild, overgrown forest. Slept in, and ate out of dumpsters. I was thinking of a 2 star rating perhaps 3/4 through and my decision was confirmed when Sienna announced “I’m a spy”. It just felt predictable and lazy, no really unique twist. Oh and next minute, Sienna tells Christine her mum has orgies with all the ladies she lunches with (ok she didn't say orgies but that’s what I read between the lines) Towards the end it felt like the author either got carried away and excitedly added in all these unoriginal ideas (spies, orgies, free accommodation, hunted by The Agents (are we in the matrix?) etc), or alternatively she couldn't wait to finish and took the obvious, lazy storylines. The one good thing that came out of this is that despite my lack of enjoyment of this book, reading it did affirm my relatively new inkling that I unexpectedly kinda like dystopian or speculative fiction stories!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fleeno

    Christine lives in Safetown, a gated community/city where all their needs are provided for and every second of their lives is monitored. The media tells them outside the city isn't safe, there are wars, violence, inside they are safe and free. But after her best friend disapears Christine begins to wonder if her family and the media are telling the whole truth. When Christine is caught kissing a brown, female, servant, her life is turned upside down and for the first time she leaves the safety o Christine lives in Safetown, a gated community/city where all their needs are provided for and every second of their lives is monitored. The media tells them outside the city isn't safe, there are wars, violence, inside they are safe and free. But after her best friend disapears Christine begins to wonder if her family and the media are telling the whole truth. When Christine is caught kissing a brown, female, servant, her life is turned upside down and for the first time she leaves the safety of her home to find the woman she has fallen in love with. Although this novel is set firmly in a dystopian world, it isn't depressing, in fact many part were hopeful and uplifting. Though there is fear and violence in this world there is also hope and a beautiful love story between Christine and Sienna - two very different people who find and love each other despite the odds. Claire G Coleman is an automatic buy for me so I bought this without even reading the blurb. She has such a beautiful way of writing and weaving Indigenous stories and history, and current social issues into different genres. It brings a deeper emotion into the well trodden dystopian  genre and I genuinely felt for Christine. Christine leaving the enclave reminded me of people leaving a cult and how they really are reliant on the kindness of strangers to find their way in a new world. It made me consider how we treat those who are exiled either from their countries or their families for being different, and how we can all do better. If you've never read any of Coleman's books do yourself a favour a pick one up, they are amazing

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s a 3, but more a 3.5. Think of it as a solid 7 star review. I really like the way Claire writes and I think she’s only getting better book-by-book. The idea behind Enclave is interesting but to me it spends too long on the set up, too long on the arduous journey and too little on the details of what the utopian Melbourne looks like and how it came to be. Maybe that’s just me as a resident but it just felt like Melbourne today with more vertical gardens. I would also like to know what happene It’s a 3, but more a 3.5. Think of it as a solid 7 star review. I really like the way Claire writes and I think she’s only getting better book-by-book. The idea behind Enclave is interesting but to me it spends too long on the set up, too long on the arduous journey and too little on the details of what the utopian Melbourne looks like and how it came to be. Maybe that’s just me as a resident but it just felt like Melbourne today with more vertical gardens. I would also like to know what happened between now and this future utopia to allow the “Government policies and laws at the time…” that made enclaves possible. Aside from climate change being a challenge, it’s unclear what might have lead to this kind of extreme seceding from society. And the twist… it’s a little too simple and it’s been done before. It reminded me of The Village or any walled dystopia where a utopia has been lurking outside, hidden by the elders. I became far more interested in the story behind the story: how the enclaves came to be, how much they are messing with the economies and societies they seceded from, and the ragtag bunch of spies trying to bring them down. All in all, a really enjoyable read that puts an LGBTQI+ cast front and centre and uses sci-fi to make some great points in an entertaining way which is what Claire has always done so well.

  10. 5 out of 5

    kaitlyns_library

    I do love dystopian novels and this one is not any different. This novel does focus on racism and homophobia/transphobia and highlights the segregation of white people to minorities. But, only in the Safetown Enclave. This book was slow to start, but became quite fast-paced half-way through.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Chaffer

    A thought provoking novel. Could make for a good 'Black Mirror' episode. A thought provoking novel. Could make for a good 'Black Mirror' episode.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Deb Chapman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 stars. I like Claire G Coleman’s writing style and it sometimes reminds me of DorisLessing, especially DL’s forays into sci-fi. (Which is meant as a compliment) Her imagination and story lines in all the books of hers that I’ve read are fab. Again the story line in this was intriguing but not as well executed as I hoped. The first half is pretty slow, brilliant mid section and then the ending is too short, predictable and not as well described, so ultimately a bit disappointing. Some of the 3.5 stars. I like Claire G Coleman’s writing style and it sometimes reminds me of DorisLessing, especially DL’s forays into sci-fi. (Which is meant as a compliment) Her imagination and story lines in all the books of hers that I’ve read are fab. Again the story line in this was intriguing but not as well executed as I hoped. The first half is pretty slow, brilliant mid section and then the ending is too short, predictable and not as well described, so ultimately a bit disappointing. Some of the plot at the end a bit construed (would you really stop loving the love of your life if they hadn’t told you your best friend was trans? I doubt it and so silly after what she’d gone thru?) The timing and pace variation frustrated me a bit too, going from intricate moment to moment descriptions to broad strokes and many days passing. Enjoyable read, and a page turner in parts, but not my favourite of hers

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    Gripping novel of a future that could happen. While a bit slow to get going, once the action starts, it's unflinching and captivating. I was engrossed in this "world" and struggling to make sense of it. Once revealed, it's scary how easily this could happen. I love dystopian that seems frighteningly possible! Thank you to Hachette AU for sending me a review copy. Gripping novel of a future that could happen. While a bit slow to get going, once the action starts, it's unflinching and captivating. I was engrossed in this "world" and struggling to make sense of it. Once revealed, it's scary how easily this could happen. I love dystopian that seems frighteningly possible! Thank you to Hachette AU for sending me a review copy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    First half of this book was very slow. Second half moved a little faster. One needed to take huge jumps in believabilty in some sections. Characters were rather 2 dimensional. I think it tried to incorporate too many issues and so covered none very well.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth De

    I wanted to like this book. I found it predictable and repetitive. I nearly put it down but pressed on after reading reviews here saying it got better in the second half which it did but still lacked credibility.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ann Graham

    Possibly just 2 and a half stars. A future enclave, where the residents are kept safe, is not all it purports to be. Good premise but I thought the ending just too slick to be believable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ami Latona

    Another Claire Coleman book that needs to be on the school curriculum please and thank you education departments.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I received this from the publisher, Hachette, at no cost. If you've read Terra Nullius or The Old Lie, by Coleman, then I heartily recommend the same strategy as I used: just read the book. Don't read this review, don't read the blurb. You already have a sense of how Coleman writes, and what Coleman writes. The first two were very different, but you know how they're similar; this is also very different, but it's clearly a Coleman novel. If you were staggered by those first novels, then you reall I received this from the publisher, Hachette, at no cost. If you've read Terra Nullius or The Old Lie, by Coleman, then I heartily recommend the same strategy as I used: just read the book. Don't read this review, don't read the blurb. You already have a sense of how Coleman writes, and what Coleman writes. The first two were very different, but you know how they're similar; this is also very different, but it's clearly a Coleman novel. If you were staggered by those first novels, then you really don't need to anything else other than: it's a new Coleman novel. Still with me? Haven't read either of the first two (but now you know you should because they're amazing), or somehow not sure about this one? Christine lives in a walled city with no contact with the outside world. Everyone knows that the outside world is terrifying, full of violence and bad things; unlike their city, which is calm and peaceful and carefully surveilled for any trouble. Everyone who lives inside this city is white; the bussed-in servants are brown, but they're nameless and just go about making houses liveable. Christine isn't entirely happy - her best friend is missing and she doesn't know what to do - and then does something unforgivable, and then everything changes. It's fantastic.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Sharp

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A pleasure to give this an honest rating; I'd swung by a few months ago to give it a 5 after evidence it had been review-bombed. This book explodes into technicolour halfway through; I don't think I've seen a story swing so hard from scabpicking to hugboxing (I think?) There's a kind of breathless aspiration that infuses the second half completely, and I have to remind myself it aims to provide a vision, and not reflexively reject it simply because we (reflecting upon contemporary society) haven' A pleasure to give this an honest rating; I'd swung by a few months ago to give it a 5 after evidence it had been review-bombed. This book explodes into technicolour halfway through; I don't think I've seen a story swing so hard from scabpicking to hugboxing (I think?) There's a kind of breathless aspiration that infuses the second half completely, and I have to remind myself it aims to provide a vision, and not reflexively reject it simply because we (reflecting upon contemporary society) haven't earned it. Romance is a bit basic, a bit of a sketch. Queer futures got a better treatment in The Memory Librarian. Still, what a time we're living in where I can have that book and this within the same quarter year. Also: For an adult brought up within the difficult restrictive social norms of her parent's society, the protagonist comes across as bewilderingly naive of her culture's values. Kinda want to read Claire's contribution to After Australia now. Excited to get to that and This All Come Back Now.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 4 out of 5

    BB

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claire G.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah_mary

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nyssa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bray

  29. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jax Kirwan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...