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No One Crosses the Wolf: A Memoir

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A powerful memoir about the traumas of a perilous childhood, a shattering murder-suicide, and a healing journey from escape to survival to recovery. Growing up, Lisa Nikolidakis tried to make sense of her childhood, which was scarred by abuse, violence, and psychological terrors so extreme that her relationship with her father was cleaved beyond repair. Having finally been A powerful memoir about the traumas of a perilous childhood, a shattering murder-suicide, and a healing journey from escape to survival to recovery. Growing up, Lisa Nikolidakis tried to make sense of her childhood, which was scarred by abuse, violence, and psychological terrors so extreme that her relationship with her father was cleaved beyond repair. Having finally been able to leave that relationship behind, surviving meant forgetting. For years, “I’m fine” was a lie Nikolidakis repeated. Then, on her twenty-seventh birthday, Nikolidakis’s father murdered his girlfriend and her daughter, and turned the gun on himself. Nikolidakis’s world cracked open, followed by conflicted emotions: shock, grief, mourning for the innocent victims, and relief that she had escaped the same fate. In the tragedy’s wake, questions lingered: Who was this man, and why had he inflicted such horrors on her and his last victims? For answers, Nikolidakis embarked on a quest to Greece to find her father’s estranged family and a reckoning with the past she never expected. In her gripping and moving memoir, Nikolidakis explores not only the making of a killer but her own liberation from the demons that haunted her and her profound self-restoration in the face of unimaginable crimes.


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A powerful memoir about the traumas of a perilous childhood, a shattering murder-suicide, and a healing journey from escape to survival to recovery. Growing up, Lisa Nikolidakis tried to make sense of her childhood, which was scarred by abuse, violence, and psychological terrors so extreme that her relationship with her father was cleaved beyond repair. Having finally been A powerful memoir about the traumas of a perilous childhood, a shattering murder-suicide, and a healing journey from escape to survival to recovery. Growing up, Lisa Nikolidakis tried to make sense of her childhood, which was scarred by abuse, violence, and psychological terrors so extreme that her relationship with her father was cleaved beyond repair. Having finally been able to leave that relationship behind, surviving meant forgetting. For years, “I’m fine” was a lie Nikolidakis repeated. Then, on her twenty-seventh birthday, Nikolidakis’s father murdered his girlfriend and her daughter, and turned the gun on himself. Nikolidakis’s world cracked open, followed by conflicted emotions: shock, grief, mourning for the innocent victims, and relief that she had escaped the same fate. In the tragedy’s wake, questions lingered: Who was this man, and why had he inflicted such horrors on her and his last victims? For answers, Nikolidakis embarked on a quest to Greece to find her father’s estranged family and a reckoning with the past she never expected. In her gripping and moving memoir, Nikolidakis explores not only the making of a killer but her own liberation from the demons that haunted her and her profound self-restoration in the face of unimaginable crimes.

30 review for No One Crosses the Wolf: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Nakamura

    3.5 stars, fearlessly told, and it's a beautiful thing to have a voice, to stand up and tell your truth, your trauma, and how you come into your own strength and resilience. I do think there was repetition and moments describing all the drinking etc and some of that, maybe 50 pages or more even, could have been cut out with the same effect, while still giving the reader enough detail and insight into the continual cycle of self destruction. It just became a little much. In one part of the book, 3.5 stars, fearlessly told, and it's a beautiful thing to have a voice, to stand up and tell your truth, your trauma, and how you come into your own strength and resilience. I do think there was repetition and moments describing all the drinking etc and some of that, maybe 50 pages or more even, could have been cut out with the same effect, while still giving the reader enough detail and insight into the continual cycle of self destruction. It just became a little much. In one part of the book, she gives a list of all her likes and interests, and i really think brief passages about that could have given a more rounded version of her, amidst the trauma and drinking etc, these brief glimpses into the rest of her personality and soul would have helped alleviate the heaviness. But at the same, the heaviness is what she lived with for so long, the weight of the horrible traumas she went through. So I do get the choice to focus on that. I guess for me personally (also as a person who went through trauma) I'd like it to have been less repetitive, it kind of drags down/depresses the reader/feels too heavy. The end and feeling of home in Greece was amazing. The horrific abuse and crushing anxiety had me on edge. For me this is a book that is important, a book of healing. I won't read it again. Too heavy. Not going to keep.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cid Herman

    The best books are those that make you feel. The best memoirs are those that make you remember your own experiences and, despite your differences, leaves you able to understand and empathize with the writer. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF: A MEMOIR, does all of that. Lisa Nikolidakis is an excellent writer who clearly put everything she has into her memoir. She lays herself bare in ways that will make some readers squirm. All readers will come to understand exactly how damaged she was during her formativ The best books are those that make you feel. The best memoirs are those that make you remember your own experiences and, despite your differences, leaves you able to understand and empathize with the writer. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF: A MEMOIR, does all of that. Lisa Nikolidakis is an excellent writer who clearly put everything she has into her memoir. She lays herself bare in ways that will make some readers squirm. All readers will come to understand exactly how damaged she was during her formative years. Damaged to the point of being broken, her undoing is a painful thing to experience, even vicariously. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF, told in three parts, is initially, a painful coming of age story about a girl navigating a family controlled by a childish father. Her father, not only sexually abuses her, but sometimes, later, cries in grief, at the foot of her bed, begging her forgiveness and promising never to let it happen again. This same father, who rages behind closed doors, and is the charismatic life of the party everywhere else, has to be the center of attention, no matter what. Outwardly this feels like a normal nuclear family living in the New Jersey suburbs, vacationing at the shore with extended family members. Both parents are working hard, raising their children and taking an interest in their school activities. They are active in the Greek Orthodox church, reflecting the father's birth place and pride in his Greek heritage. When the parents argue they try to hide it from the kids I am convinced that "coming of age" is hard on everybody. Being a kid (or a parent) is no picnic, even under the best of circumstances. This author absolutely nails the nearly universal awkwardness of grade school, need for belonging, the quirkiness of extended families, and the impact of grandparents, either by their absence or presence, in our lives. Like the author, I too had a spaced out (possibly on drugs) babysitter who nearly burnt the house down, and was never invited back. I too had a quiet shy grandmother who, for more than five years, was an intregal part of our household. And yet, because she would literally hide from anyone who wasn't family, was rarely seen by neighbors or visitors. Even if the experiences I share with the author aren't yours, you are sure to find common ground in the fascinating details of her childhood experiences. There are gaps in Lisa's childhood memories, but the impact of her experience is undeniable. Her rebellion in her teens is extreme. She literally goes off the rails, raging at the world and punishing herself with dangerous behavior. This includes drugs, alcohol, numerous bizzare sexual encounters, and eventually a long term boyfriend who stifles her and stalks her. These experiences are written in absolutely shocking detail. This downard spiral goes on for years. The fact that she is able to support herself, live her wrecked, alcohol fueled, sleep deprived life, AND still get a Doctorate degree is nothing short of amazing. When her father does the most horrific thing imaginable, it forces her to look for answers both inside herself and in a small village on Crete, his birthplace. It also reinforces every shameful thing about him, many that have been her burden and secret for years. This is not a story of redemption, because there is no curing the pain caused by one very sick man. It does illustrate that even in darkness there is some light and that there is some good in even the most evil people. Nothing is all black or all white. That leaves room for hope. This is an excellent book about a personal tragedy that I devoured. It moves fast and is a fascinating read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    June Lorraine Roberts

    A beautifully written, extraordinary memoir that situates you in a place and time with fearless honesty, and brings you forward into amelioration. Highly recommended.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cid Herman

    The best books are those that make you feel. The best memoirs are those that make you remember your own experiences and, despite your differences, leaves you able to understand and empathize with the writer. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF: A MEMOIR, does all of that. Lisa Nikolidakis is an excellent writer who clearly put everything she has into her memoir. She lays herself bare in ways that will make some readers squirm. All readers will come to understand exactly how damaged she was during her formativ The best books are those that make you feel. The best memoirs are those that make you remember your own experiences and, despite your differences, leaves you able to understand and empathize with the writer. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF: A MEMOIR, does all of that. Lisa Nikolidakis is an excellent writer who clearly put everything she has into her memoir. She lays herself bare in ways that will make some readers squirm. All readers will come to understand exactly how damaged she was during her formative years. Damaged to the point of being broken, her undoing is a painful thing to experience, even vicariously. NOONE CROSSES THE WOLF, told in three parts, is initially, a painful coming of age story about a girl navigating a family controlled by a childish father. Her father, not only sexually abuses her, but sometimes, later, cries in grief, at the foot of her bed, begging her forgiveness and promising never to let it happen again. This same father, who rages behind closed doors, and is the charismatic life of the party everywhere else, has to be the center of attention, no matter what. Outwardly this feels like a normal nuclear family living in the New Jersey suburbs, vacationing at the shore with extended family members. Both parents are working hard, raising their children and taking an interest in their school activities. They are active in the Greek Orthodox church, reflecting the father's birth place and pride in his Greek heritage. When the parents argue they try to hide it from the kids I am convinced that "coming of age" is hard on everybody. Being a kid (or a parent) is no picnic, even under the best of circumstances. This author absolutely nails the nearly universal awkwardness of grade school, need for belonging, the quirkiness of extended families, and the impact of grandparents, either by their absence or presence, in our lives. Like the author, I too had a spaced out (possibly on drugs) babysitter who nearly burnt the house down, and was never invited back. I too had a quiet shy grandmother who, for more than five years, was an intregal part of our household. And yet, because she would literally hide from anyone who wasn't family, was rarely seen by neighbors or visitors. Even if the experiences I share with the author aren't yours, you are sure to find common ground in the fascinating details of her childhood experiences. There are gaps in Lisa's childhood memories, but the impact of her experience is undeniable. Her rebellion in her teens is extreme. She literally goes off the rails, raging at the world and punishing herself with dangerous behavior. This includes drugs, alcohol, numerous bizzare sexual encounters, and eventually a long term boyfriend who stifles her and stalks her. These experiences are written in absolutely shocking detail. This downard spiral goes on for years. The fact that she is able to support herself, live her wrecked, alcohol fueled, sleep deprived life, AND still get a Doctorate degree is nothing short of amazing. When her father does the most horrific thing imaginable, it forces her to look for answers both inside herself and in a small village on Crete, his birthplace. It also reinforces every shameful thing about him, many that have been her burden and secret for years. This is not a story of redemption, because there is no curing the pain caused by one very sick man. It does illustrate that even in darkness there is some light and that there is some good in even the most evil people. Nothing is all black or all white. That leaves room for hope. This is an excellent book about a personal tragedy that I devoured. It moves fast and is a fascinating read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Goth Gone Grey

    Trauma, triggers, pain and release I enjoy reading such memoirs from the psychological aspect, while wishing for the author to find their peace. What unfolds is a tale about a Greek father, bragging about Greek inventions like mathematics, and his teen, Goth-emo-teen-angst favorite daughter. Except, no. It's not that sitcom-friendly easy, as she recounts early memories of grooming, abuse, favoritism between siblings, and more. Not surprisingly, this leads to CPTSD, poor coping mechanisms, bittern Trauma, triggers, pain and release I enjoy reading such memoirs from the psychological aspect, while wishing for the author to find their peace. What unfolds is a tale about a Greek father, bragging about Greek inventions like mathematics, and his teen, Goth-emo-teen-angst favorite daughter. Except, no. It's not that sitcom-friendly easy, as she recounts early memories of grooming, abuse, favoritism between siblings, and more. Not surprisingly, this leads to CPTSD, poor coping mechanisms, bitterness, anger, and overall awful life decisions. And then - spoiler - her father makes it so much worse with a double murder before killing himself. There's only so much one person can take, and this is far over the limit. Her grief and pain is palpable as her journey towards self-destruction floors it. You can't help but root for the child that never was, and the woman you hope she can be. A sudden decision to go to Greece and find her family had me hopeful yet wincing. The challenge of loving yourself when you're half the person who did such awful things to you seems insurmountable, and yet she emerges triumphant, me silently cheering while reading. An example of the writing: "I want to whisper to twelve-year-old me that none of it was my fault, but I couldn’t have heard that then. My world only made sense when its failings were my own. If only I could have behaved better, spoken finer Greek, been less sensitive. If, if, if. I hung my hat on that puny conjunction because if it were my fault, that meant I had the power to stop it, to stop him. Power. Control. I couldn’t admit I had none, so I believed I had it all. I sat up in bed, feet pressed to carpet, and slapped my own face. I had to toughen up. Still crying, I slapped again, numb to the sting of my own palm. To be a daughter—to survive being his daughter—I had to grow a shield. I’d be a rhinoceros, thick with dermal armor, my skin deflecting any pain thrown at me. No more crying. No more running to my mom. No more feeling anything. If I grew my armor thick enough, I thought, I could survive anything. And soon I’d be ready for battle." Peace and healing to the author with thanks for sharing your story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott J Pearson

    Fathers can sometimes present themselves to their children as a tyrannical lot, especially in abusive situations. Young ones can feel trapped in circumstances because they cannot escape their family, yet their circumstances are oppressive to their own personal growth. Coming to peace with their situation and themselves can consume years of early adulthood. Nikolidakis’ story embodies this storyline, yet as a thirty-something, a trip to Greece, her ancestral home, brought her a sense of peace and Fathers can sometimes present themselves to their children as a tyrannical lot, especially in abusive situations. Young ones can feel trapped in circumstances because they cannot escape their family, yet their circumstances are oppressive to their own personal growth. Coming to peace with their situation and themselves can consume years of early adulthood. Nikolidakis’ story embodies this storyline, yet as a thirty-something, a trip to Greece, her ancestral home, brought her a sense of peace and love that she never found in her American home. Nikolidakis unfortunately experienced the worst sort of patriarchal family structure: abuse and oppression. Eventually, even her father’s death in unspeakable circumstances would haunt her the rest of her life. Yet she found a way – somehow – to overcome it. Over subsequent years, she has earned a PhD and become an English professor. Understanding how she transitioned from a vulnerable girl into a strong woman birthed the writing of this tale. In the end, a trip to Greece and specifically Crete, to her father’s hometown, brought her the beginnings of the closure that she craves. Nikolidakis’ determination and perseverance can serve as an inspiration to younger girls in particular, but they can potentially inspire anyone who admires inner strength. The writing is engaging, though a bit dark. Readers have to be ready to engage with some of the worst that humanity has to offer. Yet this memoir ends in hope and concomitant healing. I’m not sure that I’d recommend this book to anyone and everyone because it is so heavy. Readers looking forward to a light escape will not find that here. Nonetheless, people who like to deal with the harder edges around human nature can find much to appreciate. This is a story of being redeemed from a bad childhood, and that redemption is found in the third and final part. Navigating through the weeds of the first two parts is indeed difficult. Stories like this can remind me of how good I have it, despite any hardships that I might face.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reid Burroughs

    a page turner However I found it a bit overly self absorbed. And dealing with all problems with drinking pretty boring after awhile. I wouldn’t want my teenage daughter reading this. Rather than pointing to solving this despicable problem the author endured she ensures the reader understands how much and often she used alcohol to cope. It’s bragging about alcoholism so if that triggers you don’t read this book. I so much wanted the mom to be the superhero in the story but she is portrayed as anot a page turner However I found it a bit overly self absorbed. And dealing with all problems with drinking pretty boring after awhile. I wouldn’t want my teenage daughter reading this. Rather than pointing to solving this despicable problem the author endured she ensures the reader understands how much and often she used alcohol to cope. It’s bragging about alcoholism so if that triggers you don’t read this book. I so much wanted the mom to be the superhero in the story but she is portrayed as another adult who abandoned the situation. Also hard to believe she talked to her employers calling a group of men bastards while taking their order. Maybe under her breath. Writers gonna write readers gonna read. The author is as stubborn and hot headed as the father. Never connecting or accepting help as a child. Perhaps she could have helped if she could have trusted adults as a child. It’s heart wrenching how cruel a situation a family can find themselves in because no one is willing to speak the truth. It’s a very disturbing story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenifer

    I might not have read, or even seen, this book under normal circumstances. I am very selective about memoirs; this author was not yet on my radar. I chose the book as a First Read on Amazon and was happily surprised at its quality. The author is brave to have been so open and honest - sometimes brutally so - about her life story. I found it painful at times to read of her choices, but I do not judge her negatively for having made them. It is amazing that she survived not only the abuse in her ear I might not have read, or even seen, this book under normal circumstances. I am very selective about memoirs; this author was not yet on my radar. I chose the book as a First Read on Amazon and was happily surprised at its quality. The author is brave to have been so open and honest - sometimes brutally so - about her life story. I found it painful at times to read of her choices, but I do not judge her negatively for having made them. It is amazing that she survived not only the abuse in her earlier years, but the effects of her later behaviors. Some Goodreads folk have commented that her story is repetitive, and/that she could have winnowed some specifics. I saw her book as a record of her journey toward healing. This book is not for everyone, especially not for those who do not want to read of personal excesses. But it is worth reading nonetheless.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Becky Deal

    Did not go into the explanations I was expecting. The author writes beautifully, which gives the reader much insight into the effects of her trauma. But my interpretation of the plot explanation led me to believe she would learn more of what led to her father's behavior from his family in Crete. This was not the case. The sense of family she felt from being with her Greek relatives, seems to have contributed to her emotional healing. Perhaps she did not go there looking for explanations but for f Did not go into the explanations I was expecting. The author writes beautifully, which gives the reader much insight into the effects of her trauma. But my interpretation of the plot explanation led me to believe she would learn more of what led to her father's behavior from his family in Crete. This was not the case. The sense of family she felt from being with her Greek relatives, seems to have contributed to her emotional healing. Perhaps she did not go there looking for explanations but for feelings of being connected. I probably would not have read this book had I known that she found no revelations about the sources of his behavior. Reading about the self destructive ways she used to blot out the abuse she suffered made for uncomfortable reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Matyunenkov

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 stars ⭐️ No One Crosses the Wolf, by Lisa Nikolidakis, tugged at my heart. It wasn’t the type of book that I could just plow through. I needed to take breaks and read something else because the story was just making me feel too sad. The author did a beautiful job taking us through her journey. From the abuse, to her drug and alcohol abuse, to her finally being able to find some peace and healing…we got to go through the whole journey with her. Were there times in the book that felt rushed? Y 3.5 stars ⭐️ No One Crosses the Wolf, by Lisa Nikolidakis, tugged at my heart. It wasn’t the type of book that I could just plow through. I needed to take breaks and read something else because the story was just making me feel too sad. The author did a beautiful job taking us through her journey. From the abuse, to her drug and alcohol abuse, to her finally being able to find some peace and healing…we got to go through the whole journey with her. Were there times in the book that felt rushed? Yes. Were some parts repetitive? Yes. But overall, it was a powerful piece, and I commend the author for having the strength to tell her story.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    An epic memoir of childhood trauma, family dysfunction, and a father who becomes a monster. As someone who works in mental health with chicken who have experienced trauma it was so saddening to read these childhood experiences and wish so badly that this child could have been saved what she experienced. I wondered too how the author could continue ignoring so many symptoms like her anxiety and panic attacks and addiction to drinking ... but this is what trauma does. The section of the book set i An epic memoir of childhood trauma, family dysfunction, and a father who becomes a monster. As someone who works in mental health with chicken who have experienced trauma it was so saddening to read these childhood experiences and wish so badly that this child could have been saved what she experienced. I wondered too how the author could continue ignoring so many symptoms like her anxiety and panic attacks and addiction to drinking ... but this is what trauma does. The section of the book set in Greece was simply magical. Highly recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Simonson

    Memoirs are not usually my go-to genre but I am so glad I picked this book up. It is phenomenal, from beginning to end. Seriously the best book I’ve read this year, and I read A LOT. The writing is flawless and the author’s voice is so powerful. I wouldn’t change a single thing about this book. (With that being said, there are definitely a lot of triggers in this book so read with caution. I have a rocky past, though, and was able to get through the book with only a few tears/moments of angst).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Drabowicz

    This was an easy and compelling read into the life of the author, who, although our paths don’t merge down trauma, do at times intersect in someway. I love her courage and head on confrontation with shame through some of the most unspeakable choices we all can make. I love the philosophizing that happened once she made it to Greece because it all just made it sound so profoundly clear and simple, a good overlay for what is not. I’m glad the author faced her fears and found what she needed. I fel This was an easy and compelling read into the life of the author, who, although our paths don’t merge down trauma, do at times intersect in someway. I love her courage and head on confrontation with shame through some of the most unspeakable choices we all can make. I love the philosophizing that happened once she made it to Greece because it all just made it sound so profoundly clear and simple, a good overlay for what is not. I’m glad the author faced her fears and found what she needed. I felt like a friend or a worried sister throughout. I also felt like me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Lisa does an amazing job of walking us through a tumultuous childhood and traumatic relationship with her father. There are few memoirs that I've read that make me feel not as alone with my complex family relationships, but this is definitely one of them. I identify so much with her grapple with forgiveness for her family. She writes with such honesty and connection to the reader. I hope that we get to hear more stories of her joy in the present. Lisa does an amazing job of walking us through a tumultuous childhood and traumatic relationship with her father. There are few memoirs that I've read that make me feel not as alone with my complex family relationships, but this is definitely one of them. I identify so much with her grapple with forgiveness for her family. She writes with such honesty and connection to the reader. I hope that we get to hear more stories of her joy in the present.

  15. 4 out of 5

    skip kelley

    A two day read I had a hard time putting this book down. It is very well written and heart wrenching. I know such evil happens to children everyday and it is so sad. To read the story of the pain and scars, the recovery, joy and hope was painful and heartwarming. Thank you Ms. Nikolidakis for a story that could not have been easy to tell.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ellen

    A gripping, moving story Beautifully written. I felt every emotions good and bad. I was horrified at the abuse, but amazed at the courage and ability to do what was needed to.grow beyond the pain. Extremely powerful!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol Myrick

    This Arthur is amazing. You will think so too. I really liked her clear honesty. She really exposed herself and her inner feelings. She psychologically analyzed her on issues her journey to healing is amazing. Sometimes her life is very dark but she proves she is a survivor.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This book was so hard to read, but I felt compelled to finish it. The hopeless and inevitability of Lisa’s life was gut wrenching. Knowing that she ultimately turned her life around allowed me to keep going. The second part of the book was cathartic.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Loveless

    A heroic struggle to leave the past behind. I almost stopped reading when I encountered the dark secret but the author does a great job of showing how her character works through her past and allows herself to feel loved again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deb Bensom

    This memoir was engaging enough so that you wanted to see how it evolved,,, how she evolved. The trauma she endured evokes sympathy. Basically the book is about her slow realization that she is suffering from PTSD. Her way of dealing with it takes a healthier turn in the last third of the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Enid

    This was a powerful book about love, hate and abuse. It brought back many memories of my own father and I though no where near as bad. I've found that there is always that silver lining after it all so you just have to keep fighting to get there. Loved it. This was a powerful book about love, hate and abuse. It brought back many memories of my own father and I though no where near as bad. I've found that there is always that silver lining after it all so you just have to keep fighting to get there. Loved it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Axworthy

    Memoirs are not my typical cup of tea but this one stood out to me when reading the blurb. Lisa tells her story in a way that made me forget it was non-fiction multiple times. Her story is heart breaking and difficult to read at times. The growth and journey towards healing was portrayed well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynda Young

    What a Journey! The beginning seemed so dark, yet a very well told story. I was pulled in, wanting to understand where Lisa was at and how she overcame it all. Beware, the language is very rough. Normally, I won't read books with that language, but it was integral to the story. What a Journey! The beginning seemed so dark, yet a very well told story. I was pulled in, wanting to understand where Lisa was at and how she overcame it all. Beware, the language is very rough. Normally, I won't read books with that language, but it was integral to the story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mikki

    What an excellent memoir. I was totally surprised at how much I loved this book. It grabbed me and would not let go. Well written, well edited, and a gripping narrative.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Larry Fancy

    No One Crosses. the Wolf This was a very tough read but hard to put down. Enjoyed the beginning and middle but thought the final chapters were not as well developed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Crane

    Fantastic! What a heart breaking story, and yet she managed to make me snicker a few times. This book shows just how strong some people can be.

  27. 5 out of 5

    mary e comfort

    Excellent Heartfelt, honest, raw at times but not too much that it triggers the reader. I teach for a trauma I formed yoga school and I already recommended this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allan H. Goodman

    Painful and Joyful This is truly a very difficult and tragic story to read-fear, sexual physical, and emotional abuse, PTSD, and survival. A hopeful ending.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Mitchell

  30. 4 out of 5

    cheryl anderson

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