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The Complete Crumb Comics, Vol. 15: Featuring Mode O'day and Her Pals

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The definitive, comprehensive series reprinting Crumb's published career enters the mid-1980s with this 15th volume, a period that many critics consider to be the richest of Crumb's career. Anchored by Crumb's contributions to the seminal anthology Weirdo, created and edited by Crumb, this volume includes the first several appearances of classic Crumb character Mode O' Day The definitive, comprehensive series reprinting Crumb's published career enters the mid-1980s with this 15th volume, a period that many critics consider to be the richest of Crumb's career. Anchored by Crumb's contributions to the seminal anthology Weirdo, created and edited by Crumb, this volume includes the first several appearances of classic Crumb character Mode O' Day, the networking fashion plate that serves as a foil for some of Crumb's most biting satire about America's cultural "elite." Other Weirdo highlights include Crumb's fascinating adaptation of Dr. R. Von Krafft-Ebing's "Psychopathia Sexualis," and "Where Has it Gone, all the Beautiful Music of Our Grandparents?", two stories often-cited as being amongst Crumb's very best work. The Weirdo section wraps up with yet another classic, "The Religious Experience of Philip K. Dick," which chronicles the last years of the highly-regarded science-fiction writer who experienced an intense vision of the apocalypse and believed that he was possessed by the spirit of Elijah. Also included are Crumb's first collaborations with the late writer Charles Bukowski, including the chapbook "Bring Me Your Love," as well as several collaborations with Harvey Pekar from his autobiographical series American Splendor. The book is rounded out with a color section that includes rare album art for various jazz and blues greats, as well reproductions of his various comic book covers from this period. Crumb is the most revealing of all artists, and The Complete Crumb Comics leaves no stone unturned. Featuring a lengthy introduction by Peter Bagge.


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The definitive, comprehensive series reprinting Crumb's published career enters the mid-1980s with this 15th volume, a period that many critics consider to be the richest of Crumb's career. Anchored by Crumb's contributions to the seminal anthology Weirdo, created and edited by Crumb, this volume includes the first several appearances of classic Crumb character Mode O' Day The definitive, comprehensive series reprinting Crumb's published career enters the mid-1980s with this 15th volume, a period that many critics consider to be the richest of Crumb's career. Anchored by Crumb's contributions to the seminal anthology Weirdo, created and edited by Crumb, this volume includes the first several appearances of classic Crumb character Mode O' Day, the networking fashion plate that serves as a foil for some of Crumb's most biting satire about America's cultural "elite." Other Weirdo highlights include Crumb's fascinating adaptation of Dr. R. Von Krafft-Ebing's "Psychopathia Sexualis," and "Where Has it Gone, all the Beautiful Music of Our Grandparents?", two stories often-cited as being amongst Crumb's very best work. The Weirdo section wraps up with yet another classic, "The Religious Experience of Philip K. Dick," which chronicles the last years of the highly-regarded science-fiction writer who experienced an intense vision of the apocalypse and believed that he was possessed by the spirit of Elijah. Also included are Crumb's first collaborations with the late writer Charles Bukowski, including the chapbook "Bring Me Your Love," as well as several collaborations with Harvey Pekar from his autobiographical series American Splendor. The book is rounded out with a color section that includes rare album art for various jazz and blues greats, as well reproductions of his various comic book covers from this period. Crumb is the most revealing of all artists, and The Complete Crumb Comics leaves no stone unturned. Featuring a lengthy introduction by Peter Bagge.

30 review for The Complete Crumb Comics, Vol. 15: Featuring Mode O'day and Her Pals

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    This volume is special to me because it was right around the time these stories were published that I first started getting into Crumb’s work. I discovered both Harvey Pekar’s American Splendor and the Crumb-edited issues of Weirdo within a few years of each other and was blown away. The cover feature touts the Mode O’day stories from Weirdo. At the time, they seemed very 80's-centric, but, in rereading them, I find more of a timeless quality to them. The 80's references are there, but they're mo This volume is special to me because it was right around the time these stories were published that I first started getting into Crumb’s work. I discovered both Harvey Pekar’s American Splendor and the Crumb-edited issues of Weirdo within a few years of each other and was blown away. The cover feature touts the Mode O’day stories from Weirdo. At the time, they seemed very 80's-centric, but, in rereading them, I find more of a timeless quality to them. The 80's references are there, but they're more window dressing than the point of the story. The strip where Mode and Doggo try to pass him off as an artist is one of my favorites, and just as true of today's art world as it was then. And, having read the previous volumes in this series, I can read the strip about Doggo wanting to go to Nicaragua and see how he's essentially standing in for Fritz the Cat. Fritz would have been right at home with sweeping everyone up in the wake of his particular brand of romantic chaos … Other high points: Crumb’s Middle America version of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” is another personal favorite. And “Hypothetical Quandry” is one of the finest stories ever to appear in American Splendor. Although I know Zap by reputation, I actually haven't read many of them, so I had never seen “Patton” or “Jesus People USA” before. Both are excellent, particularly “Patton.” It’s not about the general, but rather blues musician, Charley Patton, and it's worth the price of the book all by itself. Also, Peter Bagge contributes one of the best introductions of any volume so far. This volume is a shining example of just how deserved Crumb’s reputation as an artist is. Highly, highly recommended!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    I'm of two minds on this one. On the one hand, Crumb's arguably one of the great geniuses of comics, and anyone seriously interested in comics ought therefore to want a comprehensive collection of his work, which this series provides, in affordable, well-produced volumes. On the other hand, the very completeness and sequencing of the material actually does not show it in its best light. Comics stories rub shoulders with cover images, occasional art, book illustrations, promotional pieces, and so I'm of two minds on this one. On the one hand, Crumb's arguably one of the great geniuses of comics, and anyone seriously interested in comics ought therefore to want a comprehensive collection of his work, which this series provides, in affordable, well-produced volumes. On the other hand, the very completeness and sequencing of the material actually does not show it in its best light. Comics stories rub shoulders with cover images, occasional art, book illustrations, promotional pieces, and so on, all decontextualized from their original sources. The effect, at times, is in fact negative. One of the books' high points is Crumb's biography of Charlie Patton, showcasing what was for Crumb at the time a relatively new approach, both in his visual style and in his choice of subject matter. It's a strong piece of work. And then, after it, we get a few illustrations, such as party ads and birth announcements--nice enough, and certainly what the completist wants, but it's pretty anticlimactic, after the Patton story. The book illustrations removed from the context of the books they illustrate, must lose at least some of their meaning, though they do serve as decent stand-alone pieces. I don't know, the overall effect just seems too scattershot to me to really show off Crumb at his best. On the other other hand, do I nevertheless want the complete set of the complete Crumb? Well, of course I do.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    I liked this much better than the last one I read (Vol. 13). I know its because this one has a better quality of story. In the last one it was like Crumb was just making up every story as he went, with no idea what it was even going to be about until he drew it. The stories in here seem to move past that hippy dippy drug influenced stories he was doing, to some with a bit more substance. My BIG complaint with this book, and I'd imagine this whole series if they share a similar design, is all of t I liked this much better than the last one I read (Vol. 13). I know its because this one has a better quality of story. In the last one it was like Crumb was just making up every story as he went, with no idea what it was even going to be about until he drew it. The stories in here seem to move past that hippy dippy drug influenced stories he was doing, to some with a bit more substance. My BIG complaint with this book, and I'd imagine this whole series if they share a similar design, is all of the pages that are NOT comics. It is cool to see Crumbs artwork, but I feel like a book called the Complete Crumb Comics would have more...comics.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hamish

    Crumb is a fantastic artist, but I'm not sure I feel very strongly about his writing. Two different sources told me this era is his best, but I think I should have gone with the 60s stuff instead. Crumb is a fantastic artist, but I'm not sure I feel very strongly about his writing. Two different sources told me this era is his best, but I think I should have gone with the 60s stuff instead.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jake Kelly

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tom Landis

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ben Levien

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Clemo

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Calaman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julian

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Drazba

  13. 5 out of 5

    Wilmer Wolf

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dane Martin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joe Cloyd

  17. 4 out of 5

    Seth

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve Ellerhoff

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charlie 3000

  21. 4 out of 5

    Max Coates

  22. 5 out of 5

    christopher

  23. 5 out of 5

    Granit Hysiqi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janne Mäkelä

  25. 4 out of 5

    DBC

  26. 4 out of 5

    connor

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justin Grimbol

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mountmoldy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ma

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jason

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