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Surprise Island

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The Boxcar Children have a home with their grandfather now but their adventures are just beginning! Their first adventure is to spend the summer camping on their own private island. The island is full of surprises, including a kind stranger with a secret." The Boxcar Children have a home with their grandfather now but their adventures are just beginning! Their first adventure is to spend the summer camping on their own private island. The island is full of surprises, including a kind stranger with a secret."


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The Boxcar Children have a home with their grandfather now but their adventures are just beginning! Their first adventure is to spend the summer camping on their own private island. The island is full of surprises, including a kind stranger with a secret." The Boxcar Children have a home with their grandfather now but their adventures are just beginning! Their first adventure is to spend the summer camping on their own private island. The island is full of surprises, including a kind stranger with a secret."

30 review for Surprise Island

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    dude, what the fuck When I was a kid I remember only being super interested in the first two books in the series because they were all about kids surviving on their own and that was My Jam™, and when I saw they had been adapted to graphic novels, I assumed they would be in the Raina Telgemeier arena. But no, this is hella adapted to the point that I almost wondered if it was a parody. It is that fucking bad. How do you cut a book to about 15% its original and, of all things, decide that the best dude, what the fuck When I was a kid I remember only being super interested in the first two books in the series because they were all about kids surviving on their own and that was My Jam™, and when I saw they had been adapted to graphic novels, I assumed they would be in the Raina Telgemeier arena. But no, this is hella adapted to the point that I almost wondered if it was a parody. It is that fucking bad. How do you cut a book to about 15% its original and, of all things, decide that the best thing to keep is a bunch of shit about "finding Indian stuff" and a really questionable long lost relative? The only thing I truly remembered about this book was picking and shelling peas, and lucky for me that was in like one panel, but otherwise this is completely incomprehensible as a narrative and jut horrible in its creative choices. Throw it in the trash.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shiro-Sharon

    it was a cute read and very fun pictures with great details and storyline... can't wait for the next book! it was a cute read and very fun pictures with great details and storyline... can't wait for the next book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Bland

    good story for young elementary students.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert Bryant

    The Box Car Children, A series that has been around for generations has now been illustrated into a graphic novel. After reading novel #2, Surprise Island, It is apparent that the stories are just as adventurous and even more exciting than ever. The illustrations bring the book to life for the reader and creates a connection that is unlike any other. Through mysterious adventures and strange events the novels engage the reader in every aspect of the story. holding the reader is suspense until th The Box Car Children, A series that has been around for generations has now been illustrated into a graphic novel. After reading novel #2, Surprise Island, It is apparent that the stories are just as adventurous and even more exciting than ever. The illustrations bring the book to life for the reader and creates a connection that is unlike any other. Through mysterious adventures and strange events the novels engage the reader in every aspect of the story. holding the reader is suspense until the very end of the tale. The novels carry a very different feel with the illustrations and graphic designs. The animations of the characters cause for the emotions of the story to flow to the reader as he or she reads along. The dialog form of the text makes as if the conversation is happening in real time. The gutters that are used continuously change, influencing the timing in between events which take place in the novel. the illustrations hold the most important role over all. Though the text may tell the story it is the animations and illustrations that make it. Through great detail and careful consideration the combination of all aspects brings the novel to life and enhances the readers imagination of the

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jill Sanders

    The Boxcar Children is in a narrative point of view. This graphic novel is about four siblings and their dog that go on adventures at an island they are staying with their grandfather. There are two boys named Henry and Benny; and there are two girls named Jessie and Violet. Their dog's name is Watch and follows them on their interesting adventures. There are eight parts to this book that are almost like chapters. This book reminds me of reading the comics in the newspaper when I was young. I lo The Boxcar Children is in a narrative point of view. This graphic novel is about four siblings and their dog that go on adventures at an island they are staying with their grandfather. There are two boys named Henry and Benny; and there are two girls named Jessie and Violet. Their dog's name is Watch and follows them on their interesting adventures. There are eight parts to this book that are almost like chapters. This book reminds me of reading the comics in the newspaper when I was young. I loved reading the comics, like my older brother. I loved how this book introduces the main characters in the beginning of the book. I also love how the author's text is in a yellow box, while the character's comments are in a white bubble coming from their figure. This book could be used for as an idea for a scavenger hunt, understanding the student comprehension after being read. I would have groups of four students in the class and whichever group wins first receives a prize. There will be comprehension questions and vocabulary from the book on slips of paper around the classroom and the answers will be on another piece of paper. Each question will have a different colored paper and the answer will be on the same color piece of paper, so the students will know if they got the answer right or wrong. The students will have to search for the item or word in the class that answers the question. For example, Violet was given a violin in one of the chapters. A question could be: Violet was given a _______ by Joe, hidden by the _______ chart. The students would have to comprehend that Violet was given a violin, which relates to music so it is hidden by the music chart. This teaches them strategy, helps them get to know the classroom, and pushes their comprehension of the story. The lexile for this story is 530 and the guided reading level is an O. I think students will begin to become interested in this book around third grade, but I would not expect them to read it independently until the end of fourth grade.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenica

    Summary: The Boxcar Children are four siblings who live with their grandfather. As a summer vacation their grandfather allows them to stay on a small island. While on the island the children find a plethora of items. They discover some Indian remains as well as some unique flowers and shells. They start a small museum in an old barn of all the artifacts they have found. The Children also find their long lost cousin. They have a picnic on the island and surprise their grandfather with their cousin Summary: The Boxcar Children are four siblings who live with their grandfather. As a summer vacation their grandfather allows them to stay on a small island. While on the island the children find a plethora of items. They discover some Indian remains as well as some unique flowers and shells. They start a small museum in an old barn of all the artifacts they have found. The Children also find their long lost cousin. They have a picnic on the island and surprise their grandfather with their cousin. The Boxcar Children learn how to live on the island name the island Surprise Island because of all the crazy surprises that they find. Response: I was a fan of the original Boxcar Children series when I was young. I thought that this book would bring back some of those memories as well as enlighten me on the “Graphic Novel.” I have never read a graphic novel before. This book was disappointing. It lacked detail and I was often lost in the story. I rated this book with 2 stars because it was not well written. Classroom Connection: I would split my class in two and have some of them read the original novel and some read the graphic novel. Then I would have the students talk about the different aspects of the story they liked and didn’t like. I think this would help young students to look at a book and be able to discern what they liked and didn’t like about the book or the style. Text Complexity: I was not able to find a Lexile measure or Guided Reading level. However, the non-graphic novel is a third grade level book. Therefore I would think this book would be good for self-reading in 3-5th grade and as a read-a-loud for grades 2-4.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Seideman

    I love the Boxcar Children. In fact, as I write this very review I have a whole set of the original children’s books sitting right beside me in a drawer. However, just like the Graphic Novel adaptation of the Hardy Boys, this mystery classic has lost a lot of the mystery and cunning that played such a prevalent role in the original books, and has been replaced with a focus on the children having finally found people to call family. This isn’t bad, per se, but it’s lost some of its charm during t I love the Boxcar Children. In fact, as I write this very review I have a whole set of the original children’s books sitting right beside me in a drawer. However, just like the Graphic Novel adaptation of the Hardy Boys, this mystery classic has lost a lot of the mystery and cunning that played such a prevalent role in the original books, and has been replaced with a focus on the children having finally found people to call family. This isn’t bad, per se, but it’s lost some of its charm during the transition. The illustrations by Mike Dubisch are done well, by hand first then touched up digitally. While sometimes keeping illustrations simple will pay off in adding to the detail in the scene, the pictures here don’t add the same level of detail to the characters and their faces that was found in Gertrude Warner’s original works. However, the art does a great job of adding momentum to some of the duller moments of the Boxcar Children making it more accessible for younger readers. Again, a beloved franchise of mine had the potential to be revived, but there’s just too much lost in translation for the original spirit of the books to come through.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    Oy vey, what a hot mess. Does every standard format book need to be made into a graphic novel? Not if it's thrown together without any care, like Surprise Island. The illustrations were ridiculous. The children seemed to always be laughing, jumping, and throwing their arms in the air, even if it wasn't appropriate for the situation. AND! ALL! THE! EXCLAMATION! POINTS! Are we really supposed to believe that the children are this excited? The grammar was odd at some points. In certain sentences, it al Oy vey, what a hot mess. Does every standard format book need to be made into a graphic novel? Not if it's thrown together without any care, like Surprise Island. The illustrations were ridiculous. The children seemed to always be laughing, jumping, and throwing their arms in the air, even if it wasn't appropriate for the situation. AND! ALL! THE! EXCLAMATION! POINTS! Are we really supposed to believe that the children are this excited? The grammar was odd at some points. In certain sentences, it almost seemed like this has been poorly translated from another language. Also, I can't forget the use of the word "Indian" in place of Native American. Native American artifacts are referred to as "Indian things". Now, perhaps that was an appropriate label when the original Boxcar series was written, but this graphic novel was published in 2009. Native American would have been a better choice than the use of the word Indian. The panels were totally disjointed. Now they're fishing! Now they're playing! Now they're digging for treasure! The plot was broken up to a point that you could hardly tell where the action was taking place. Maybe hard-core Boxcar fans will enjoy this. Maybe.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Wallace

    I personally did not care for Gertrude Warner's graphic novel. I thought that it was confusing to read, and left out many important details which were relevant and necessary in order for the story line to make complete sense. This book followed four siblings on their summer adventure as they lived on their grandpa's private island. They set up their own museum, and played escavated in caves to find pieces of indian artifacts. Although I did not particularly enjoy this book, I can see how childre I personally did not care for Gertrude Warner's graphic novel. I thought that it was confusing to read, and left out many important details which were relevant and necessary in order for the story line to make complete sense. This book followed four siblings on their summer adventure as they lived on their grandpa's private island. They set up their own museum, and played escavated in caves to find pieces of indian artifacts. Although I did not particularly enjoy this book, I can see how children would be engaged and entertained by the pictures and the comic-strip like text features. The illustrations were well done, and fit the form of a true comic book. They were bright, detailed, and engaging. Any opportunity to get kids excited about reading is a beneficial one, so I would recommend this story to young readers who enjoy graphic novels, and the boxcar children series. I do not, however, see much use for this story in the classroom setting, other than teaching expression, and discussing different types of literature. This book is intended more for personal reading.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    The Boxcar Children novels always make me feel *so* nostalgic for the times when I would stow away in my secret ship (aka my bed) with a great new adventure that was always loads of fun. The series, as a whole, is just so adorably sweet and innocent that it just can't help but make you smile. That said, I didn't love this graphic novel adaptation of the second book as much as I loved the first one. The illustrations were definitely cute and fun, but the storyline of dear old grandpa leaving the b The Boxcar Children novels always make me feel *so* nostalgic for the times when I would stow away in my secret ship (aka my bed) with a great new adventure that was always loads of fun. The series, as a whole, is just so adorably sweet and innocent that it just can't help but make you smile. That said, I didn't love this graphic novel adaptation of the second book as much as I loved the first one. The illustrations were definitely cute and fun, but the storyline of dear old grandpa leaving the boxcar kids to sleep on hay in a barn on their very own private island was just never my favorite. Overall, I think SURPRISE ISLAND was a tad bit more enjoyable in the original format -- although I'm sure that anyone who loved this series in their childhood would still enjoy the graphic novels-- if for no other reason than that they provide a heartwarming little stroll down memory lane...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Chind

    While I read this as an epub from @Netgalley on my nookcolor and it was a bit rough, I think there is a lot of potential. My issue was that the font was too small to read comfortably in speech bubbles and such. However, on a bigger screen like an ipad or other larger tablet it might be fine. Also unknown to me, but perhaps in a real epub copy one might be able to zoom. This was my first attempt to read a graphic novel on my nook. It eould also be great on a computer screen or in real print form. While I read this as an epub from @Netgalley on my nookcolor and it was a bit rough, I think there is a lot of potential. My issue was that the font was too small to read comfortably in speech bubbles and such. However, on a bigger screen like an ipad or other larger tablet it might be fine. Also unknown to me, but perhaps in a real epub copy one might be able to zoom. This was my first attempt to read a graphic novel on my nook. It eould also be great on a computer screen or in real print form. The story was good and the images fun. A neat way to bring in another way to interact with the beloved quartet of The Boxcar Children. Originally posted: http://creativemadnessmama.com/blog/2...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    There were some major problems with this book. The dialogue was stiff and disorganized. I felt like the people weren't speaking properly and it really bugged me. The story didn't make much sense and I didn't see the overall plot or story structure - it just felt like a bunch of random snippets thrown together. I also wasn't impressed with the illustrations. This book needed some major editing and the characters were very flat and uninteresting. I have fond memories of reading the Box Car series, There were some major problems with this book. The dialogue was stiff and disorganized. I felt like the people weren't speaking properly and it really bugged me. The story didn't make much sense and I didn't see the overall plot or story structure - it just felt like a bunch of random snippets thrown together. I also wasn't impressed with the illustrations. This book needed some major editing and the characters were very flat and uninteresting. I have fond memories of reading the Box Car series, but this does not live up to those standards at all. *Taken from my book reviews blog: http://reviewsatmse.blogspot.com/2011...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Rosales

    The Aladean children are in for a great surprise when school is out. Their grandfather has promised to take them to an island that their great grandfather has bought. Henry , Jessie, Violet and Benny and Grandpa are taken to the island by Captain Daniel. They are eager to set up a living place and explore. When the children meet Joe the handyman they didn’t know they were going to make a great friend. Joe helps the children set up a museum of artifacts that they find throughout the island. As su The Aladean children are in for a great surprise when school is out. Their grandfather has promised to take them to an island that their great grandfather has bought. Henry , Jessie, Violet and Benny and Grandpa are taken to the island by Captain Daniel. They are eager to set up a living place and explore. When the children meet Joe the handyman they didn’t know they were going to make a great friend. Joe helps the children set up a museum of artifacts that they find throughout the island. As summer draws to and end, the children don’t want to leave. However after learning that Joe is their long lost cousin the children are at ease when Joe decides to go live with them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Drew Erkelens

    I remember reading the handed down Boxcar Children books from my moms childhood when I was younger and that they were always my favorite. It was interesting to find that they were adapted into graphic novels since I never knew this before. I liked having the pictures put with the words versus reading the short novel and putting my own images with the story, it completely changed the story for me. Kids would like reading these series because of the mystery involved in each of them, along with the I remember reading the handed down Boxcar Children books from my moms childhood when I was younger and that they were always my favorite. It was interesting to find that they were adapted into graphic novels since I never knew this before. I liked having the pictures put with the words versus reading the short novel and putting my own images with the story, it completely changed the story for me. Kids would like reading these series because of the mystery involved in each of them, along with the cool pictures to follow.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christiane

    Zero stars. What a disappointment. The artwork is boring, the dialogue is laughable ("That's my brother, Pat! I told him about this picnic. Him and that boy Johnny stole a rowboat to come here in."), and the plot is hard to follow even if you have read the original book. There are some wonderful graphic novelizations of kid's fiction (Coraline and The Baby-Sitter's Club leap to mind) but these are not worth even the few mintutes it will take you to read them. Zero stars. What a disappointment. The artwork is boring, the dialogue is laughable ("That's my brother, Pat! I told him about this picnic. Him and that boy Johnny stole a rowboat to come here in."), and the plot is hard to follow even if you have read the original book. There are some wonderful graphic novelizations of kid's fiction (Coraline and The Baby-Sitter's Club leap to mind) but these are not worth even the few mintutes it will take you to read them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leiah J

    Weird. The Babysitters Club graphic novels I read earlier this year were eons better than these Boxcar Children ones. I don't really remember these old books, and I felt like I was missing out on a lot of plot details. Everything was strangely abbreviated, in spots it was downright comical. I was like What?! is going on here? Ugh, and the Comic Sans. Of course, just of course. Weird. The Babysitters Club graphic novels I read earlier this year were eons better than these Boxcar Children ones. I don't really remember these old books, and I felt like I was missing out on a lot of plot details. Everything was strangely abbreviated, in spots it was downright comical. I was like What?! is going on here? Ugh, and the Comic Sans. Of course, just of course.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Boxcar Children are going to experience a summer adventure that they will never forget. They are going to visit a private island monitored by a mysterious stranger. Their quests include sleeping in a barn, exploring the ocean, creating a museum, and discovering what used to be an Indian point.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Clearly less detailed than the full chapter book, but a good alternative for introducing the series to certain types of readers or using it to compare types of texts (the full chapter book to the graphic novel).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Again, a dry story, but at least the imagery was plainly clear. For a story set in the 1940s, the drawings of the kids clothes and boat make it seem modern day. Also this graphic adaption really stole away from the book, lots of stuff and plot was left out.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gardavson

    While a bit difficult the believe that the rich relative would leave the children to vacation alone in a barn without stockpiling food and basic necessities, it was still a fun read for me and my daughter and she really enjoyed it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I love these graphic novels. I'm pretty sure I'm going to read the books too. I love these graphic novels. I'm pretty sure I'm going to read the books too.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kellee Moye

    Reviewed at: http://www.teachmentortexts.com/2011/... Reviewed at: http://www.teachmentortexts.com/2011/...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kaela Spencer

    Cute story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tamara the Librarian

    Really really boring. Disjointed storyline. Ridiculously simplistic dialogue-- I don't remember the actual books being this bad but the graphic novel version stinks!! Really really boring. Disjointed storyline. Ridiculously simplistic dialogue-- I don't remember the actual books being this bad but the graphic novel version stinks!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    Cute Cute continuation of the story of the children I really enjoyed watching the children find their relative and the adventures they had on the island

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Sawler

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  28. 4 out of 5

    denis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jean

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