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The Art of Product Management: Lessons from a Silicon Valley Innovator

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The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley's tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley's tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, and what things should cost. He also reminds us to love our products and our teams. The Art of Product Management brings together the best insights from more than seven years of Product Bytes, Rich Mironov's long-running series on product strategy, technology companies, and how the two interact. This collection is for everyone who builds or markets the next new thing.This is more a how to think about products book than how to templates. Product managers (and others who are deeply committed to great products) will recognize themselves and their daily process struggles. How do I think about customers and solutions? Why does my organization behave the way it does? Can I help others to think long-term, or do I need to think for them? This book captures the inner life of product champions.


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The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley's tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley's tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, and what things should cost. He also reminds us to love our products and our teams. The Art of Product Management brings together the best insights from more than seven years of Product Bytes, Rich Mironov's long-running series on product strategy, technology companies, and how the two interact. This collection is for everyone who builds or markets the next new thing.This is more a how to think about products book than how to templates. Product managers (and others who are deeply committed to great products) will recognize themselves and their daily process struggles. How do I think about customers and solutions? Why does my organization behave the way it does? Can I help others to think long-term, or do I need to think for them? This book captures the inner life of product champions.

30 review for The Art of Product Management: Lessons from a Silicon Valley Innovator

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Decent book. It is a collection of Rich's writings from over the years about Product Management. I wish I had been given this book when I first became a PM, but now that I've been doing it for a few years there was little in here that I hadn't seen or thought of before. It was very high level with not enough specific examples, and I think there are better PM resources of its type out there (the Cranky Product Manager being one of my favorite). That said, there were a couple good articles that I'l Decent book. It is a collection of Rich's writings from over the years about Product Management. I wish I had been given this book when I first became a PM, but now that I've been doing it for a few years there was little in here that I hadn't seen or thought of before. It was very high level with not enough specific examples, and I think there are better PM resources of its type out there (the Cranky Product Manager being one of my favorite). That said, there were a couple good articles that I'll likely send around to friends, but I didn't have to read the entire book to get to those gems. If you're interested in reading it, I can cherry-pick the best articles and send you the online links without boring you with the entire book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julian Dunn

    Rich Mironov is a Silicon Valley product management veteran, part of that early cohort of PMs who really defined what modern product management means. He did this not only through his work at a variety of startups, but also in his blogging and newsletters, of which much of this book is derived from. I actually wasn't familiar with Rich until I was introduced to him this year by way of a PM colleague. Rich then sent me an electronic copy of his book, saying that he hoped I would enjoy it but with Rich Mironov is a Silicon Valley product management veteran, part of that early cohort of PMs who really defined what modern product management means. He did this not only through his work at a variety of startups, but also in his blogging and newsletters, of which much of this book is derived from. I actually wasn't familiar with Rich until I was introduced to him this year by way of a PM colleague. Rich then sent me an electronic copy of his book, saying that he hoped I would enjoy it but with the caution that it is quite old at this point. It is that, being that it predates the widespread adoption of software-as-a-service (SaaS), agile development methodologies, and the subscription economy. As such, it's true that some of his essays are not quite as relevant in 2020, but the others, especially regarding the fundamental role of "product", are still insightful. Rich was accurate in positioning product management as a strategic function that sits between the market and engineering, and defined a set of core competencies that involve balancing business acumen and delivery management. His essays on roles & responsibilities read as fresh today as they did in 2003, which means that in this area of the tech industry, not much has changed, to the detriment of customers everywhere. (My previous company's failure to even have a product management discipline until nearly six years into its existence, coupled with its inability to recognize that the future of enterprise software was SaaS, invariably led to its downfall -- something that Rich could probably have predicted five years before the firm was even founded.) Rich's writing is concise and accessible, and while I wouldn't recommend the entire book to product managers today, the essays that I mentioned above are still worthwhile. I'm guessing they can also be found on his website at mironov.com.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Philipp Keller

    Meine Hoffnung an das Buch: Als jemand mit Engineering-Background, der sich Richtung Produkt-Verantwortung entwickelt, erhoffte ich vom Buch zu verstehen, "wie ein Product-Guy" denkt, was die Werkzeuge und die täglichen Herausforderungen sind. Dies deckt das Buch gut ab, ist daher ein gute Primer. Das Buch ist relativ kurz, als langsamer Leser hatte ich es in 3 Tagen gelesen. Es besteht aus einem "Best Of" von Rich Mironovs Blog "Product Bytes". - Teil 1: "Falling in Love" (IMO der beste Teil des Meine Hoffnung an das Buch: Als jemand mit Engineering-Background, der sich Richtung Produkt-Verantwortung entwickelt, erhoffte ich vom Buch zu verstehen, "wie ein Product-Guy" denkt, was die Werkzeuge und die täglichen Herausforderungen sind. Dies deckt das Buch gut ab, ist daher ein gute Primer. Das Buch ist relativ kurz, als langsamer Leser hatte ich es in 3 Tagen gelesen. Es besteht aus einem "Best Of" von Rich Mironovs Blog "Product Bytes". - Teil 1: "Falling in Love" (IMO der beste Teil des Buchs) beschreibt, wie ein "Product Guy" tickt und hilft zu verstehen, wann man "in product mode" ist und wann nicht - Teil 2 "Organizing Your Organization" geht um organisatorische Herausforderungen (ebenfalls relevant) - Teil 3a geht um Agile (Scrum) und die verschiedenen Produkt-Rollen darin (überraschend: es gibt nicht nur Product Owner sondern braucht auch Leute darum herum). Da ich ca. 10 Jahre Erfahrung mit Scrum habe, war davon vieles überflüssig. - Teil 3b geht um Software as a Service und geht vom Switch von CDROM basierten Software-Rollouts zu Service-Providern (auf eigenen Servern). Dieser Teil ist zu 90% überholt und kann mit gutem Gewissen übersprungen werden - Teil 4 "Getting into Customers' Head" geht darum, den Kunden zu verstehen um das Produkt/Prizing initial richtig zu platzieren und dann auch iterativ der Entwicklung die richtige Inputs zu liefern (zweitbester Teil des Buchs) - Teil 5 geht um Prizing. 50% davon sehr relevant (wie kriegt man Prizing hin das fair klingt und der Käufer in seiner Firma argumentieren kann), 50% davon outdated weil zehn Jahre alt (laminierte Preislisten). Fazit: ein gelungenes Buch, sehr wertvolle Inputs, gewisse Strecken sind aber outdated und kann man getrost überspringen

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hachi

    A little too basic for experience product managers, a bit too in-depth for new or aspiring product managers. The Art or Product Management is a collection of blog posts from Rich Mironov’s blog Product Bytes. On the upside, when I found a chapter (blog post) relevant to a colleague I could simply pull it up on his website and send it to my colleague for reading and discussion. On the downside, I didn’t get much additional value for purchasing the book over just reading a curated list of posts fr A little too basic for experience product managers, a bit too in-depth for new or aspiring product managers. The Art or Product Management is a collection of blog posts from Rich Mironov’s blog Product Bytes. On the upside, when I found a chapter (blog post) relevant to a colleague I could simply pull it up on his website and send it to my colleague for reading and discussion. On the downside, I didn’t get much additional value for purchasing the book over just reading a curated list of posts from Mironov’s site. Still, the book is considered essential reading for every product manager, and I did find some insights that were simultaneously obvious and not in practice within my organization, so there are gems in the book to learn from. It would be nice, though, if Mironov put out a second edition to update the book for today’s tech world. The lessons are still valuable but the context he provides for them are over 10 years old and getting older every day. 3.5/5 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daniil Saiko

    3.5 rounded to 4. Also rounded to 4 as I see coming back to specific topics to review. There are a lot of good bits, and format in which you can bookmark and come back to. Overall discussion points are good, dated example due to age of the book but still relevant.

  6. 4 out of 5

    pushkar

    Very old 2005 version with little insight Totally avoidable for any expectation of 2020 digital product management knowledge. Also price of 600+ is too steep even for a leisure read. I got its name from top reads for pm from producthunt. Anyways, my reco is to stay away.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I didn’t think that a book about frameworks and theory on product management would age so significantly, but it really has. This collection of blog posts does not hold up well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gaku Ueda

    It's like a bunch of blog posts. There's no coherent story and the topic jumps all around. It's like a bunch of blog posts. There's no coherent story and the topic jumps all around.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elena U.B.G.

    Fine as a guide for PM, if you just want to enter that field.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Great collection of blog posts. Constant thought as I’m reading is - imagine if a company was actually managed like this...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Sarrica

    Derived from a successful, long-running blog focused on product management, "The Art of Product Management: Lessons from a Silicon Valley Innovator" is a quick read that delivers its wisdom in bite-sized snippets. I enjoyed the numerous real world examples and recognized many similarities to situations from my own workplace. I am new to that workplace and to the product management role, so I can't really comment authoritatively on the accuracy or value of Mironov's guidance, but I do know that I Derived from a successful, long-running blog focused on product management, "The Art of Product Management: Lessons from a Silicon Valley Innovator" is a quick read that delivers its wisdom in bite-sized snippets. I enjoyed the numerous real world examples and recognized many similarities to situations from my own workplace. I am new to that workplace and to the product management role, so I can't really comment authoritatively on the accuracy or value of Mironov's guidance, but I do know that I have already found it helpful early in my tenure.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    I don't always enjoy books that are just collections of blog articles because they often lack an overarching cohesion. However, many of the articles are interesting, easily digested, and have some great points of view in terms of what a product manager is and what makes a product manager good. I don't always enjoy books that are just collections of blog articles because they often lack an overarching cohesion. However, many of the articles are interesting, easily digested, and have some great points of view in terms of what a product manager is and what makes a product manager good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amir

    I have read the lean startup before this book and compared to that it didn't have much to offer there were a few interesting chapters but besides them it looks like an outdated book. I have read the lean startup before this book and compared to that it didn't have much to offer there were a few interesting chapters but besides them it looks like an outdated book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben Love

    A little dated, it felt, but an interesting read for no other reason than validation. Lots of head nodding while reading this.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Yawn. Maybe useful for startups, although Eric Ries' Lean Startup appeals more. Not much of relevance here to more established orgs looking to upgrade their product development capabilities. Yawn. Maybe useful for startups, although Eric Ries' Lean Startup appeals more. Not much of relevance here to more established orgs looking to upgrade their product development capabilities.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Benno

    Interesting, but a little light on.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eman Wed

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elías Pérez Carrera

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sjoerd

  20. 5 out of 5

    Saim

  21. 4 out of 5

    Prakhar

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sunil Parekh

  23. 5 out of 5

    James

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Smith

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tsiko Shakarashvili

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chandresh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Sim

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vinit

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hal Danziger

  30. 5 out of 5

    Warren Cartwright

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