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Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

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What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough -- or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive proc What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough -- or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.


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What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough -- or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive proc What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough -- or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.

30 review for Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I used this as the textbook for my interactive narrative class! It was pretty great. One chapter in the end went into detail about "procedural literacy" and how we should have more ways of increasing our literacy and understanding of (expressive) computational processes. I used this as the textbook for my interactive narrative class! It was pretty great. One chapter in the end went into detail about "procedural literacy" and how we should have more ways of increasing our literacy and understanding of (expressive) computational processes.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    Recommended by a friend who researches narrative and artificial intelligence. Or something like that. I suppose I will most likely never do any work in this field, but I can't really be in the humanities in the 21st century without at least trying to be aware of digital media. Recommended by a friend who researches narrative and artificial intelligence. Or something like that. I suppose I will most likely never do any work in this field, but I can't really be in the humanities in the 21st century without at least trying to be aware of digital media.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Interesting and approachable book for the topic of software, digital fiction, and games study.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  6. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Arnold

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Nelson

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  9. 4 out of 5

    Don

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karl Mendonca

  11. 4 out of 5

    William

  12. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nikolaos

  15. 5 out of 5

    Raven Snow

  16. 5 out of 5

    Torill Mortensen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ted Barnett

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

  19. 5 out of 5

    Simone

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicklally

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ashhar Bustan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Samuel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristoffer

  25. 4 out of 5

    The Media Bunny

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark Poulsen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 4 out of 5

    Vanz Kim

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