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The Hound of the Baskervilles

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After the success of their Illustrated Classics version of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard have teamed up again to create a visually compelling graphic novel adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece. The superb writing and beautiful art takes Conan Doyle’s supernatural tale to new heights. All the elements are here for a thrilling tale: A g After the success of their Illustrated Classics version of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard have teamed up again to create a visually compelling graphic novel adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece. The superb writing and beautiful art takes Conan Doyle’s supernatural tale to new heights. All the elements are here for a thrilling tale: A gnarled walking stick, missing boot, neglected family portrait, convicted killer on the loose, and the ancestral curse of a phantom hound. The great detective himself, Sherlock Holmes—with the help of Dr. Watson—has his work cut out for him in a dramatic mystery that will keep readers guessing until the very end.


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After the success of their Illustrated Classics version of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard have teamed up again to create a visually compelling graphic novel adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece. The superb writing and beautiful art takes Conan Doyle’s supernatural tale to new heights. All the elements are here for a thrilling tale: A g After the success of their Illustrated Classics version of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Ian Edginton and I.N.J. Culbard have teamed up again to create a visually compelling graphic novel adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece. The superb writing and beautiful art takes Conan Doyle’s supernatural tale to new heights. All the elements are here for a thrilling tale: A gnarled walking stick, missing boot, neglected family portrait, convicted killer on the loose, and the ancestral curse of a phantom hound. The great detective himself, Sherlock Holmes—with the help of Dr. Watson—has his work cut out for him in a dramatic mystery that will keep readers guessing until the very end.

30 review for The Hound of the Baskervilles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The toffee-nosed Baskervilles are cursed with a spooky monster dog that’s killing off the family, one by one – the game is a-paw, Watson! You know what I’ve remembered reading these comics adaptations of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes novels? I don’t like the originals and I never did - Conan Doyle was a lousy writer! (The Lost World: has there ever been such an awesome concept so poorly realised?) The Hound of the Baskervilles is probably my favourite book of his but I only ever thought it was The toffee-nosed Baskervilles are cursed with a spooky monster dog that’s killing off the family, one by one – the game is a-paw, Watson! You know what I’ve remembered reading these comics adaptations of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes novels? I don’t like the originals and I never did - Conan Doyle was a lousy writer! (The Lost World: has there ever been such an awesome concept so poorly realised?) The Hound of the Baskervilles is probably my favourite book of his but I only ever thought it was mediocre. Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard’s version is worse, partly because I know the story well enough that none of the twists surprised me and partly because Culbard’s art is so slapdash and cartoony that it does a total disservice to the tone of horror and menace Doyle tried for (and more or less accomplished) in his tale. Drawn by a better artist and the creepy butterfly collector, the isolated country setting and, most importantly, the hell hound itself could’ve all been unsettling but in Culbard’s hands they’re rendered kiddie-safe and silly. Like most Holmes mysteries, the plot is convoluted without any of the interesting character moments between Holmes and Watson that define these books. But elements here and there are compelling like the mystery of the hound and the escaped convict hiding out on the moors, and I liked seeing Holmes and Watson outside of their usual London environment. Of all the Sherlock Holmes books, I’d rec The Hound of the Baskervilles, though, unlike the other graphic adaptations in this series, I wouldn’t bother with this version and go for Conan Doyle’s superior original instead. Culbard’s rubbish art waters down the atmosphere of Conan Doyle’s decent narrative too damn much.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    I have read Sherlock Holmes books, seen Sherlock Holmes movies and binge watched Sherlock TV show multiple times! So, Why not venture into a Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel too, Eh? So thats what i did. And the result have been oddly, mixed. The Hound of Baskervilles (1902) is one of THE best Holmes stories. I loved the original story because of its setting, Watson's lone investigations and the daunting supernatural tone of the antagonist. Also this was one of the first stories i have read. Oh, I have read Sherlock Holmes books, seen Sherlock Holmes movies and binge watched Sherlock TV show multiple times! So, Why not venture into a Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel too, Eh? So thats what i did. And the result have been oddly, mixed. The Hound of Baskervilles (1902) is one of THE best Holmes stories. I loved the original story because of its setting, Watson's lone investigations and the daunting supernatural tone of the antagonist. Also this was one of the first stories i have read. Oh, not only of Sherlock Holmes , but since my very existence. I was around Seven when i read an unabridged version of the story. The idea of the an over-sized monstrous hound hunting people in the moors really got hold of young me. The writing in this graphic adaption is good at the beginning, but loses some ground towards the end. As i said, this was one of my early books and i imagined the hound as scary as Dracula. But the personification of hound in this story somehow was underwhelming for me. Nevertheless, this book is a fine way to relive the epic "Hound of Baskervilles" story. But if you are reading the story for the first time, i would recommend picking up the original text by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Review from Badelynge The key to producing a good adaptation of The Hound of the Baskervilles in any media is for the producers to understand that perhaps the most important character in the story is not Sherlock Holmes, or Doctor Watson; it's the moor and the atmosphere it generates in all its aspects, whether it be the shadow filled night or the stark brightness of the day. Ian Edginton's adaptation of the famous story into the medium of graphic novel is very faithful to the Conan Doyle origina Review from Badelynge The key to producing a good adaptation of The Hound of the Baskervilles in any media is for the producers to understand that perhaps the most important character in the story is not Sherlock Holmes, or Doctor Watson; it's the moor and the atmosphere it generates in all its aspects, whether it be the shadow filled night or the stark brightness of the day. Ian Edginton's adaptation of the famous story into the medium of graphic novel is very faithful to the Conan Doyle original, but without the bulk of Doctor Watson's emotive text the realization of the moor falls to the artistic talents of the artist I.N.J. Culbard. Edginton makes the most of the early scenes in London, understandably as this is the part of the story, barring the conclusion, that features Holmes the most. Culbard's style uses what on the surface look quite simple caricatures but somehow he brings them alive with expressiveness. Each character is quite distinctive.He is also very creative in the use of available light. If Edginton relishes some of the more famous lines, Culbard who has a century of imagery from all the other mediums to draw inspiration from, doesn't disappoint. "Mr Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound." It's a very commendable and collectible effort. Edginton and Culbard work well together and readers who enjoyed their other work should have a pleasant time with this book. Also included are a teaser for A Study in Scarlet and early character and cover designs for those interested in the creative process.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    Arthur Conan Doyle's classic 1902 Sherlock Holmes novel is given the graphic novel treatment & it works pretty well. The artwork is workmanlike & straightforward without bordering on caricature. There are times when the drwaings are overshadowed by too many words on the page. However, Holmes stories have a lot of exposition so I suppose it's difficult to edit things too much. After experiencing this story in numerous formats from novel to film, television & stage adaptations it;s good to see it gi Arthur Conan Doyle's classic 1902 Sherlock Holmes novel is given the graphic novel treatment & it works pretty well. The artwork is workmanlike & straightforward without bordering on caricature. There are times when the drwaings are overshadowed by too many words on the page. However, Holmes stories have a lot of exposition so I suppose it's difficult to edit things too much. After experiencing this story in numerous formats from novel to film, television & stage adaptations it;s good to see it given a new lease of life as a graphic novel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    I love reading a classic Sherlock Holmes story, but I've never "seen" an interpretation of a Holmes mystery. The graphics and coloring enhanced both the settings and the emotional responses of the characters to the plot. I thought that the writer also did an excellent job of adapting the material to a new format. All in all, I'm very interested to read/view many more! I love reading a classic Sherlock Holmes story, but I've never "seen" an interpretation of a Holmes mystery. The graphics and coloring enhanced both the settings and the emotional responses of the characters to the plot. I thought that the writer also did an excellent job of adapting the material to a new format. All in all, I'm very interested to read/view many more!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samsnerdylife

    This book had great suspense, Sherlock and interesting illustrations! I could not have asked for more!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was my first time reading a novel starring Sherlock Holmes. I've always wanted to read about Sherlock Holmes after seeing a few movies, etc., but never got around to it. I recently went to see the newest "Sherlock Holmes" movie starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law and decided it was time I sat down and read the stories for myself. (I thought the movie was great by the way. Definitely worth seeing on the big screen) So I put it on my Christmas list and this is the book I got. First of al This was my first time reading a novel starring Sherlock Holmes. I've always wanted to read about Sherlock Holmes after seeing a few movies, etc., but never got around to it. I recently went to see the newest "Sherlock Holmes" movie starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law and decided it was time I sat down and read the stories for myself. (I thought the movie was great by the way. Definitely worth seeing on the big screen) So I put it on my Christmas list and this is the book I got. First of all, I love the illustrations in this graphic novel form of the story. Though I can't comment on how good the adaptation by Mister Ian Edginton is seeing as I have not read the original book, I thought the book flowed rather well. The story starts out with the Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes testing their skills of deduction, introducing us to these two leading characters and their roles. Dr. Watson is good at seeing signs, varittions, clues, but it takes Sherlock Holmes to really put the pieces of the puzzle together properly. The story moves on from there to the heart of the mystery at hand, "The Curse of the Baskervilles." A curse of the father carried by the sons down the line to the present where Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead by the very moor that his family was cursed to never cross at night. Why was he there knowing the curse of his family? Did he die of natural causes as was believed by many or did the Devil Hound get him? Shelock Holmes sends Dr. Watson with the latest heir to Baskerville Manor to help protect him as well as root out clues to these questions. It's a quick read and once the plot is revealed, it seems so simple, like you should have figured it out, but I didn't. Hmmm...maybe my skills of deduction need a little practice. I look forward to getting to know Sherlock and Watson as I continue to read the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I am also quite enjoying getting to know the older Holmes in the Mary Russell series by Laurie King.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    I've read The Hound of the Baskervilles more than once before, so this was more about how it translated into graphic novel form. I think they did really well to condense it into picture and dialogue only and nothing too essential was missed. The artwork while not my cup of tea worked with the writing. It is well done, but I think some of the magic has been lost in translation between formats. I've read The Hound of the Baskervilles more than once before, so this was more about how it translated into graphic novel form. I think they did really well to condense it into picture and dialogue only and nothing too essential was missed. The artwork while not my cup of tea worked with the writing. It is well done, but I think some of the magic has been lost in translation between formats.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elise Rose

    I didn’t love the art, but that’s just personal preference. This was a great adaptation of the story, but make sure you read the original masterpiece before turning to graphic novel format.

  10. 5 out of 5

    howie lemonds

    this does not hold up anyways i finished my reading challenge WOOOOOOOO

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karol (readwithkarol)

    4.5 * Big plus for me was the artwork which I really enjoyed. The style is just right for the story, everything is clear and understandable. I can see people who didn't read the original enjoying this graphic novel. It is really a great adaptation of Sherlock Holmes' adventures! 4.5 * Big plus for me was the artwork which I really enjoyed. The style is just right for the story, everything is clear and understandable. I can see people who didn't read the original enjoying this graphic novel. It is really a great adaptation of Sherlock Holmes' adventures!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Seth T.

    After an unsuccessful permanent hiatus (and killing off his great detective), Arthur Conan Doyle returned to Sherlock Holmes and penned perhaps his most famous of the sleuth’s stories. The Hound of the Baskervilles was well-regarded and is still read by students and Holmes aficionados every year. I, however, have never read the book and approached this adaptation in near total ignorance. As mentioned recently, I have some familiarity with the characters and their inclinations via the cultural hi After an unsuccessful permanent hiatus (and killing off his great detective), Arthur Conan Doyle returned to Sherlock Holmes and penned perhaps his most famous of the sleuth’s stories. The Hound of the Baskervilles was well-regarded and is still read by students and Holmes aficionados every year. I, however, have never read the book and approached this adaptation in near total ignorance. As mentioned recently, I have some familiarity with the characters and their inclinations via the cultural hivemind in the same way that I know about Bambi’s mother and the man behind the curtain without having ever seen either Bambi or The Wizard of Oz. And of course, I have now also read an adaptation of A Study in Scarlet . So while I’m starting to get a better handle on Holmes’ moods and methods, prior caveats remain in that I cannot judge the faithfulness of the adaptation but can only judge the story as it appears to me in the Edginton/Culbard work. Any issues I take with the story will be issues that may or may not be a reflection of the source itself. While Edginton and Culbard’s A Study in Scarlet chronicles the first of Conan Doyle’s Holmes stories, the pair adapted Baskervilles first (probably to help generate interest in a series I hope will continue for some time). In the backmatter, Culbard shares some of his original sketches for how he planned to render Dear Elementary Watson.* It’s interesting to compare Edginton and Culbard’s two adaptations. While Baskervilles is a fine book, one can sense certain refinements between it and Scarlet. The story flows better in Scarlet, but as I mentioned, I’m not in any position to judge whether that responsibility belongs to Edginton or Conan Doyle himself. Regardless, even in keeping our focus on Culbard’s work, we can note one singular improvement: less reliance upon technical gimmickry. In Baskervilles, Culbard experiments with Photoshop techniques to show skewed character reflections and these always look out of place. Later in the book, when rendering the moorish landscapes, he relies upon what I have to imagine are shopped photographs of the moors themselves. Each time, these additions look strikingly out of place, at odds with the wonderfully consistent style that Culbard brings to the rest of his work. Scarlet betrays none of these weaknesses so far as I remember and even though Culbard had the opportunity to experiment similarly in depictions of the American frontier, he thankfully restrained himself. I am always cheered to see an artist evolve through his work. (I am looking forward to seeing what Culbard does with The Sign of the Four, their next Holmes adaptation.) As a detective story, I’m not sure exactly why it became such a popular event in Holmes’ life. Perhaps readers of the era were unduly enamoured with the Scooby-Doo-style crossover of science vs. the supernatural. After all, if it worked for X-Files... Honestly, despite the presence of several cheats in the former tale, I really did prefer A Study in Scarlet. The present tale is built upon an overwhelming implausibility, namely that the villain would pursue the inheritor of the Baskerville fortune from his first step in London rather than simply wait for the man to walk, unsuspecting, into his trap. As the story wraps up, I found myself baffled as to why any would-be murderer smart enough to outstrip Homes in the early game would forfeit himself in such amateur ways. On the other hand, I am kind of a sucker for glowing dogs. Apart from my negative feeling toward the story’s plotting and my (mostly) positive outlook on Culbard’s art, there are two other points worth noting. For the one, the creative team again (for the first time!) does a marvelous job with Holmes’ character. He is exactly as distant and arrogant and wry as I imagine he is meant to be. He is conveyed perfectly. For the other, Edginton and Culbard take an early opportunity to present Holmes as a genius whose inductive process is incredible though far from foolproof. In the earliest episode from the book, Holmes and Watson take on the task of identifying the owner of a walking stick based on nothing save the stick itself. Holmes is patronizingly charitable toward Watson’s own attempt before revealing the whole truth of the matter. Which is then proven to be only partially correct by facts far more brute than his meager inductions. It is a humbling moment and Edginton and Culbard capture it flawlessly. If The Hound of the Baskervilles was the creative team’s first attempt and A Study in Scarlet their second, I am well onboard to see what they do with their third and can only hope their improvements carry on in a similar vector. Note: *Myth busted: Holmes said, “Elementary, my dear Watson,” as often as Rick Blaine said “Play it again, Sam.” Which was zero times. [review courtesy of Good Ok Bad]

  13. 4 out of 5

    James Hill

    from Todd: This graphic novel adaptation of the famous Sherlock Holmes novel arrests the attention of lovers of pictorial narrative. It has a steampunk sensibility in terms of the snap and sharpness it brings to this Victorian Period story. Edginton has a talent for creating a high fidelity evocation of the novel in terms of his adept selection of dialogue and plot threads, while Culbard is a graphic artist to be reckoned with in terms of his stylistic attitude and eye for detail. I rarely see gra from Todd: This graphic novel adaptation of the famous Sherlock Holmes novel arrests the attention of lovers of pictorial narrative. It has a steampunk sensibility in terms of the snap and sharpness it brings to this Victorian Period story. Edginton has a talent for creating a high fidelity evocation of the novel in terms of his adept selection of dialogue and plot threads, while Culbard is a graphic artist to be reckoned with in terms of his stylistic attitude and eye for detail. I rarely see graphic novels these days whose art and storytelling indicates such care and originality, and certainly very few which possesses this book's equality of strength in terms of both dialogue and imagery. The image frames have both subtlety and atmosphere, and the delightfully idiosyncratic faces of the characters reveal as much as any dramatic action pose. This is one of those rare occasions where an adaptation is as good as the original work that inspired it, being a parallel experience of equal quality, rather than a lesser derivative creation. I actually think Doyle would have been delighted with this graphic interpretation, especially since the intriguingly sequenced image frames make you pay attention to details just the way Sherlock's own eyes would. Plus the book doesn't miss a beat in terms of accurate period detail from architecture to the furnishings of homes, not to mention the clothing, horse carriages and steam trains. This writer/illustrator team has done treatments of other Sherlock Holmes novels over recent years – none of them to be missed!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam Molloy

    In The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle adapted by Ian Edginton, a thrilling story is told in graphic novel form in only 128 pages. It is about the mysterious Baskerville curse, that a demon hound comes out and kills any Baskerville that crosses the moor at night. Sherlock Holmes comes in the story to try and figure out the curse. Meanwhile, Henry Baskerville interacts with his neighbors, Jack Stapleton and his sister Beryl. Watson finds a number of suspects: Barrymore, a lone fig In The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle adapted by Ian Edginton, a thrilling story is told in graphic novel form in only 128 pages. It is about the mysterious Baskerville curse, that a demon hound comes out and kills any Baskerville that crosses the moor at night. Sherlock Holmes comes in the story to try and figure out the curse. Meanwhile, Henry Baskerville interacts with his neighbors, Jack Stapleton and his sister Beryl. Watson finds a number of suspects: Barrymore, a lone figure out in the moor, and what sounds like a howling dog. He then finds out that Barrymore was just signaling the escaped convict (Mrs. Barrymore's brother) for food, and the lone figure was Holmes. Holmes had found out that the Stapletons were in line for the Baskerville fortune and also that the hound belonged to Stapleton. He lures the hound with Henry Stapleton, kills it, and Stapleton drowns while fleeing. I liked this graphic novel a lot. I might have been swayed because I love Sherlock Holmes, but the novel was otherwise intriguing. This was my first graphic novel, so I was unsure about whether or not I was going to like the format, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I didn't particularly like the ending, mainly because it was vague and hard to understand the first time I read it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    This is a graphic novel adaptation of Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes Classic, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Doyle wrote this book eight years after he penned the story called “The Final Problem,” in which Holems has already been killed off but as the forward of this graphic novel stated, Doyle brought back Holmes because he needed “a strong central figure to hold the plot together.” In the world of Sherlock Holmes, this is a tale that was supposed to have taken place before Holmes’ death. This i This is a graphic novel adaptation of Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes Classic, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Doyle wrote this book eight years after he penned the story called “The Final Problem,” in which Holems has already been killed off but as the forward of this graphic novel stated, Doyle brought back Holmes because he needed “a strong central figure to hold the plot together.” In the world of Sherlock Holmes, this is a tale that was supposed to have taken place before Holmes’ death. This is my second graphic novel on Sherlock Holmes and I found it a pleasure to read this book. The plot was a real suspense and the mystery kept me going. I also appreciated the drawing and the painting in this graphic novel, especially with its coloring that perfectly sets the mood for its respective panels (dark when it’s dark, bright when it is a pleasant part of the story). I love the shadows that the illustrator has in the book as it gives that appropriate feel for a mystery especially with the fire side chats, the candles in dark hallways and outside at night. The details of the rooms in the book is beautiful. I enjoyed it enough that I’m planning to read the writer and artists’ other work on Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Scarlet.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    http://pussreboots.pair.com/blog/2016... http://pussreboots.pair.com/blog/2016...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Divya Manikumar

    𝑵𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒓 𝒊𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒅𝒆𝒍𝒊𝒓𝒊𝒐𝒖𝒔 𝒅𝒓𝒆𝒂𝒎 𝒐𝒇 𝒂 𝒅𝒊𝒔𝒐𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓𝒆𝒅 𝒃𝒓𝒂𝒊𝒏 𝒄𝒐𝒖𝒍𝒅 𝒂𝒏𝒚𝒕𝒉𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒔𝒂𝒗𝒂𝒈𝒆, 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒂𝒑𝒑𝒂𝒍𝒍𝒊𝒏𝒈, 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒉𝒆𝒍𝒍𝒊𝒔𝒉 𝒃𝒆 𝒄𝒐𝒏𝒄𝒆𝒊𝒗𝒆𝒅 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒅𝒂𝒓𝒌 𝒇𝒐𝒓𝒎 𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒔𝒂𝒗𝒂𝒈𝒆 𝒇𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝒘𝒉𝒊𝒄𝒉 𝒃𝒓𝒐𝒌𝒆 𝒖𝒑𝒐𝒏 𝒖𝒔 𝒐𝒖𝒕 𝒐𝒇 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒘𝒂𝒍𝒍 𝒐𝒇 𝒇𝒐𝒈 _ 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗵𝘂𝗿 𝗖𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗻 𝗗𝗼𝘆𝗹𝗲, 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗛𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗸𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲𝘀 ‍🕵️‍♂ Though I'm a fan of Hercule Poirot, I can't help but to admire the smarty - smarty brain of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes along with Dr.Watson made me to enjoy this book to the fullest. 🕵️‍♂️ Out of all the famous quotes from the book, I've quoted th 𝑵𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒓 𝒊𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒅𝒆𝒍𝒊𝒓𝒊𝒐𝒖𝒔 𝒅𝒓𝒆𝒂𝒎 𝒐𝒇 𝒂 𝒅𝒊𝒔𝒐𝒓𝒅𝒆𝒓𝒆𝒅 𝒃𝒓𝒂𝒊𝒏 𝒄𝒐𝒖𝒍𝒅 𝒂𝒏𝒚𝒕𝒉𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒔𝒂𝒗𝒂𝒈𝒆, 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒂𝒑𝒑𝒂𝒍𝒍𝒊𝒏𝒈, 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒉𝒆𝒍𝒍𝒊𝒔𝒉 𝒃𝒆 𝒄𝒐𝒏𝒄𝒆𝒊𝒗𝒆𝒅 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒅𝒂𝒓𝒌 𝒇𝒐𝒓𝒎 𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒔𝒂𝒗𝒂𝒈𝒆 𝒇𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝒘𝒉𝒊𝒄𝒉 𝒃𝒓𝒐𝒌𝒆 𝒖𝒑𝒐𝒏 𝒖𝒔 𝒐𝒖𝒕 𝒐𝒇 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒘𝒂𝒍𝒍 𝒐𝒇 𝒇𝒐𝒈 _ 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗵𝘂𝗿 𝗖𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗻 𝗗𝗼𝘆𝗹𝗲, 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗛𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗸𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲𝘀 ‍🕵️‍♂ Though I'm a fan of Hercule Poirot, I can't help but to admire the smarty - smarty brain of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes along with Dr.Watson made me to enjoy this book to the fullest. 🕵️‍♂️ Out of all the famous quotes from the book, I've quoted the above one because what caught my attention most in the story is the hound. I don't know why but the word 'hound' itself terrifies me. I was so thrilled to read about the hound. The author's portrayal of the hound, the sound it makes during the nights, the mysterious spooky cry on the moor everything gave me goosebumps. 🕵️‍♂️ The glimpse of the supernatural element in the book gives a horror touch. Though I know there is a man behind the crime, my mind suspected and expected supernatural things throughout. It gave me the feeling of reading a horror book. Especially the moor; the sad, mysterious, dangerous moor. I loved the way Doyle described it. 🕵️‍♂️ HOLMES, as usual, makes me wonder about his smartness. While reading the book, I compete with him in grabbing the clues and finding the criminal but I can't keep up before the spontaneity and cleverness of The Mighty Holmes. 🕵️‍♂️ Watson is bae. I love him always. I'm so happy that he has a major part in this book. So, all the Watson lovers out there should read this book to witness some 'Watson in Action' 🕵️‍♂️ I want to discuss the story in detail but Im afraid that I'll reveal too much and spoil. So, I'm just saying that every detective thriller lovers should read this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter Longden

    It is the well known story of a world famous character and turning it into a classic into a graphic novel might seem heresy, but it works. First, of all the text adaptation made by Ian Edginton deserves praise as the graphic novel has a wonderful pace and Edginton manages to condense all of the most important aspects of the plotline without making it feel rushed or irrelevant. Helping this are I. N. J. Culbart’s fantastic illustrations through which he shows his mastery of different color tones It is the well known story of a world famous character and turning it into a classic into a graphic novel might seem heresy, but it works. First, of all the text adaptation made by Ian Edginton deserves praise as the graphic novel has a wonderful pace and Edginton manages to condense all of the most important aspects of the plotline without making it feel rushed or irrelevant. Helping this are I. N. J. Culbart’s fantastic illustrations through which he shows his mastery of different color tones and careful illustrations of the Devonshire Moors make them sinister and their significance impossible to miss by the reader. He also has a superb command when it comes to depicting characters’ expressions, making his illustrations every bit as important to fully understand the story as Edginton’s choice of words. The style is very classic and a great contrast to some of the more modern designs I have seen recently. Something about the more subdued tones and variegation of colour makes the backgrounds more impressive, the characters stand out more and make the necessary impact on the page. Culbard makes impressive use of panels as the frame for Edgington's words, exemplified by the image of the story being told by Mr Jameson, alongside the text, which is set in the silhouette of Jameson's head; sometimes the panels are almost an animation showing characters progress across the moor in consecutive panels on a page. It is an outstanding interpretation of the classic tale captured in classic style with impressive illustrations.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Fleming

    A very faithful adaptation of the original, with lots of little details most versions leave out. It's not the greatest graphic novel interpretation of The Hound... I've read, but it's close - the illustrations are brilliant, and the atmosphere is incredibly close to Doyle's world-building. However, it goes too quickly through the story, and there is no excuse for giving Holmes such a ludicrously large chin. The stories describe his chin as having 'the prominence of squareness', but not being 'th A very faithful adaptation of the original, with lots of little details most versions leave out. It's not the greatest graphic novel interpretation of The Hound... I've read, but it's close - the illustrations are brilliant, and the atmosphere is incredibly close to Doyle's world-building. However, it goes too quickly through the story, and there is no excuse for giving Holmes such a ludicrously large chin. The stories describe his chin as having 'the prominence of squareness', but not being 'the size of several whale families having a group hug'. The chin is silly. More than silly. Getting angry over an illustration of an over-large chin is arguably a pointless exercise, but to me it matters. We're supposed to take Holmes seriously, and we can't do that if the lower half of his face has its own postcode. In other news, panel 2 on page 19 features an accidental yet eerily accurate cartoon drawing of Danny Boyle.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Ellis

    I had so much fun with this graphic novel! As you can probably tell this is an adaptation of the famous Sherlock Holmes story, involving a family curse, and a demon hound from hell. There was a real fact paced vibe going for the story, which you rarely get in Victorian fiction, which was helped by keeping clear chapters, which I assume are taken from the original. I also, loved the art style that gave me of 1950s, pulp fiction vibes. However, I will admit that I haven't read the original (yet) s I had so much fun with this graphic novel! As you can probably tell this is an adaptation of the famous Sherlock Holmes story, involving a family curse, and a demon hound from hell. There was a real fact paced vibe going for the story, which you rarely get in Victorian fiction, which was helped by keeping clear chapters, which I assume are taken from the original. I also, loved the art style that gave me of 1950s, pulp fiction vibes. However, I will admit that I haven't read the original (yet) so I cannot speak for accuracy Come find me at www.cartonmanettedarnay.worpress.com

  21. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Davis strader

    I’m glad I read all the other Holmes books, but I think I appreciated this one the most. Since it’s written with Watson as the main detective, Doyle is able to create a more personable inquiry throughout the case. Holmes is often so cold and direct that pleasantries are skipped over. As a result, the characters are only created to give him the information he needs. With Watson in charge, the characters were able to take on a new depth.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    This was a good time! Nice, old-timey artwork, and one can't go wrong with Sherlock! Having never read the original Hound of the Baskervilles, having, in fact, only ever seen the Basil Rathbone movie (1939), and the campy Hammer version of the movie (1959), I don't know how closely this graphic novel follows the original. They do put C0nan-Doyle's name on the cover, so one would hope it is close to his work. This was a good time! Nice, old-timey artwork, and one can't go wrong with Sherlock! Having never read the original Hound of the Baskervilles, having, in fact, only ever seen the Basil Rathbone movie (1939), and the campy Hammer version of the movie (1959), I don't know how closely this graphic novel follows the original. They do put C0nan-Doyle's name on the cover, so one would hope it is close to his work.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Munjiru

    This is one of my favorite (if not my favorite) Holmes tale and I reread it often. I read Culbard's Lovecraft series last year and really enjoyed his art style and the way the graphic novels were adapted compared to the source material, so I've decided to read more of the adaptations he's involved in. There's really not much to say here except, I enjoyed it, I would recommend it and I intend to acquire Culbard's other efforts and hopefully enjoy them as well. This is one of my favorite (if not my favorite) Holmes tale and I reread it often. I read Culbard's Lovecraft series last year and really enjoyed his art style and the way the graphic novels were adapted compared to the source material, so I've decided to read more of the adaptations he's involved in. There's really not much to say here except, I enjoyed it, I would recommend it and I intend to acquire Culbard's other efforts and hopefully enjoy them as well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    William Stanger

    This is a great graphic novel adaptation of one of my favourite Sherlock Holmes stories. It has the right atmosphere and gets the characters right. I liked the way it was drawn and it drew me in enough that i was pretty much able to read it in one setting. I had read it before, but this time I was reading it for my participation in the #savvyreadathon.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Loved it! I preferred this one to A Study in Scarlet, though they are the same in style and voice. Sherlock and Watson depicted here reminded me more of Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman in Sherlock, particularly in the way they interacted and spoke (and also appearance in Watson's case). I also enjoyed the mystery of the hound over the "Rache" murders. Loved it! I preferred this one to A Study in Scarlet, though they are the same in style and voice. Sherlock and Watson depicted here reminded me more of Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman in Sherlock, particularly in the way they interacted and spoke (and also appearance in Watson's case). I also enjoyed the mystery of the hound over the "Rache" murders.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shyla Colt

    I enjoyed this adaptation! From the art to staying true to the story and the essence of who Sherlock and Watson was and the romantic and dangerous setting of the Moore. The team who worked on this book hit a wonderful balance.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darin

    As much as I enjoyed reading the original story, it always seems to pay off a little better for me when it's done visually and this version is great. This graphic novel stays true to Doyle's original and adds some nice perspectives to the action. As much as I enjoyed reading the original story, it always seems to pay off a little better for me when it's done visually and this version is great. This graphic novel stays true to Doyle's original and adds some nice perspectives to the action.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    the artwork was fun. it still left a lot of questions unanswered. don't make me watch the movie... the artwork was fun. it still left a lot of questions unanswered. don't make me watch the movie...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Gulley

    My favorite.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I think this adaption of 'The hound of the Baskervilles' does not get the balance right. There are too many speech bubbles and not enough showing through the artwork. I think this adaption of 'The hound of the Baskervilles' does not get the balance right. There are too many speech bubbles and not enough showing through the artwork.

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