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The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry: CIG to Writing Poetry

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You're no idiot, of course. You've read poetry that has touched your heart, and you'd like to improve your own writing technique. But even though you have loads of inspiration, you're discovering that good instruction can be as elusive as a good metaphor. Don't let your Muse leave you! With loads of smart advice and helpful exercises, 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing You're no idiot, of course. You've read poetry that has touched your heart, and you'd like to improve your own writing technique. But even though you have loads of inspiration, you're discovering that good instruction can be as elusive as a good metaphor. Don't let your Muse leave you! With loads of smart advice and helpful exercises, 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry' will help you compose powerful, emotion-packed poems that you can be proud of. In this 'Complete Idiot's Guide', you get: -Simple explanatgions of the building blocks of poetry; metaphor, imagery, symbolism, repitition, and more. -A step-by-step guide to the poetic process from your first inspiration to your poems' last stanza. -Easy-to-follow guidelines for writing sonnets, sestinas, narrative poems, and more!


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You're no idiot, of course. You've read poetry that has touched your heart, and you'd like to improve your own writing technique. But even though you have loads of inspiration, you're discovering that good instruction can be as elusive as a good metaphor. Don't let your Muse leave you! With loads of smart advice and helpful exercises, 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing You're no idiot, of course. You've read poetry that has touched your heart, and you'd like to improve your own writing technique. But even though you have loads of inspiration, you're discovering that good instruction can be as elusive as a good metaphor. Don't let your Muse leave you! With loads of smart advice and helpful exercises, 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry' will help you compose powerful, emotion-packed poems that you can be proud of. In this 'Complete Idiot's Guide', you get: -Simple explanatgions of the building blocks of poetry; metaphor, imagery, symbolism, repitition, and more. -A step-by-step guide to the poetic process from your first inspiration to your poems' last stanza. -Easy-to-follow guidelines for writing sonnets, sestinas, narrative poems, and more!

30 review for The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry: CIG to Writing Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Soul Rhallin

    This book is a great resource for the D.I.Y. educator who wants to develop and explore new poetic expressions. It is beautifully constructed for both ease of use and reading. I have learned to create poetry with new formats in an easy and readily translated manner. So. If anyone is looking to broaden their poetic horizons, this is a great resource to have in your literary toolbox.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris Johnston

    The parallels between writing poetry and writing music are uncanny. Just substitute the word music for poems and composer for poet. Practical advice. Write poetry because you love it and can't help but write. Not for any other reason. The parallels between writing poetry and writing music are uncanny. Just substitute the word music for poems and composer for poet. Practical advice. Write poetry because you love it and can't help but write. Not for any other reason.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Wonderful book--well written and informative. I learned a lot about how and why poetry got started and evolved. Also, it was inspiring, and the practice exercises are great for getting you started. I turned out several poems using their guidelines. Fun!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Corrie Eavenson

    I read this for my creative writing class. I found it very useful and entertaining. My professor likes it because it's "practical and not pretentious" haha I read this for my creative writing class. I found it very useful and entertaining. My professor likes it because it's "practical and not pretentious" haha

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bob Nichols

    The book provides a history of poetry (oral, story origins; song, meter; rhythm and rhyme – way back when), and breaks down the various forms of poetic expression. The author says that poetic lines are “a unit of meaning,” creating pauses, emphasis, and points of transition; that the beginning letter of each line does not have to be capitalized (it’s an aesthetic choice); and that titles “can be the key to unlocking the meaning or concept of the poem.” Poets have a concept. They have something t The book provides a history of poetry (oral, story origins; song, meter; rhythm and rhyme – way back when), and breaks down the various forms of poetic expression. The author says that poetic lines are “a unit of meaning,” creating pauses, emphasis, and points of transition; that the beginning letter of each line does not have to be capitalized (it’s an aesthetic choice); and that titles “can be the key to unlocking the meaning or concept of the poem.” Poets have a concept. They have something to say. They see things not seen by others. They distill and paint with words. Elsewhere, the author writes that poets “render their feelings and thoughts into verse such that a reader is able to understand and feel clearly what the poet meant.” “You are not the maker of puzzles,” she writes. “If your reader is baffled, you’ve not done your job….” “Your reader should not have to decipher your poems – no one wants to work that hard.” “Better that your reader understands what you’re writing about than be mystified and put down your work. Unless you’re writing a riddle, come right out and say what you mean.” That’s all good advice for a poet, though it doesn’t seem to match up with the poetry that’s out there. In that regard, the author also writes later that poems “can be baffling if you don’t know what to look for or what to appreciate.” Given that contradiction in Moustaki’s advice, it must be that poetic expression ranges from simple song-like poems to those with complex language, structure and meaning (e.g., I suppose, The Wasteland). Moustaki states more than a few times that feeling and senses are evoked in poems by things not by “concepts and ideas.” She repeats the common advice to “Show, don’t tell.” For example, instead of saying someone has “nice legs,” a poet (William Carlos Williams) might say, “Your thighs are appletrees whose blossoms touch the sky.” In examples like that, one might prefer to stick with nice legs. Though neither fresh nor original, it’s two clear words versus nine words that create cognitive dissonance. Her advice might be a matter of taste. For poems that must be studied, do they evoke feeling and senses? Can’t conceptual insights evoke feeling and senses? Aren’t many of Will Durant’s lines on the lessons of history expressed poetically? The author also advises the budding poet to use “poetic conventions,” but fails to tell us what these are. The book itself suggests that poetry is largely free form, individualized expression, though these collectively might be categorized in some general ways. For editing and revising, the author quotes William Faulkner as the source of the “Murder your darlings” advice, which has an interesting controversy associated with it regarding attribution. Some state that Arthur Quiller-Couch was the original source of this quote.

  6. 5 out of 5

    H.R.

    For me, 2 stars. I've read a lot about poetry and writing it before though. The book itself is well done and I'd gladly recommend it to someone who is looking for a good resource who hasn't read through many. Bottom line: If you're looking for a good resource this is 4-5 stars. If you're like me and have a shelf of resources and several more scattered around the house this rates anywhere from 2-5 stars. For me, 2 stars. I've read a lot about poetry and writing it before though. The book itself is well done and I'd gladly recommend it to someone who is looking for a good resource who hasn't read through many. Bottom line: If you're looking for a good resource this is 4-5 stars. If you're like me and have a shelf of resources and several more scattered around the house this rates anywhere from 2-5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna Quinlan

    I've written some very simple poems, and was looking for a little instruction on how to improve. This book was more difficult than I would have expected for a beginning book on poetry. It was written like a textbook with so many poetic terms and what I thought were rules. I wish I had read the last few chapters first because they put reading and writing poetry in perspective. If you are looking for in-depth study of poetry this book may work for you. The exercises were the best part. I've written some very simple poems, and was looking for a little instruction on how to improve. This book was more difficult than I would have expected for a beginning book on poetry. It was written like a textbook with so many poetic terms and what I thought were rules. I wish I had read the last few chapters first because they put reading and writing poetry in perspective. If you are looking for in-depth study of poetry this book may work for you. The exercises were the best part.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Don't worry--I didn't check this out to learn to write poetry. I'm just researching. Mostly, I just looked through this book and read a the section on Slams, which was short and not terribly helpful, and the intro and the section on common mistakes. If you want to write poetry, it's fairly helpful to get you started. Don't worry--I didn't check this out to learn to write poetry. I'm just researching. Mostly, I just looked through this book and read a the section on Slams, which was short and not terribly helpful, and the intro and the section on common mistakes. If you want to write poetry, it's fairly helpful to get you started.

  9. 4 out of 5

    عصام مطير البلوي

    Simple

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    None

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ellen Ormond

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marti Martinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Waters

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Cook

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leila Montour

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dwan Peterson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Krista Mary

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Dobbs

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vashti

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Haught

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tandin Wangdi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erwin Blonde

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bricks

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine Delea

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trixy Lemell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leila

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Boscano

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