Hot Best Seller

The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (Routledge Classics)

Availability: Ready to download

I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions have not changed?' Bertrand Russell This comprehensive anthology of Russell's writings brings together his definitive essays from the period 1903 to 1959. It covers the most fertile and lasting work on every significant area he published I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions have not changed?' Bertrand Russell This comprehensive anthology of Russell's writings brings together his definitive essays from the period 1903 to 1959. It covers the most fertile and lasting work on every significant area he published in. Whether from his seminal work in the philosophies of mathematics and language, or in his provocative views on religion and international relations, his wit and seemingly effortless lucidity remain constant throughout the development of his thinking. With over eighty essays divided eighty essays divided into seventeen sections, there could be no better introduction to the enormous scope of Russell's thinking or to the depth and brilliance of his genius.


Compare

I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions have not changed?' Bertrand Russell This comprehensive anthology of Russell's writings brings together his definitive essays from the period 1903 to 1959. It covers the most fertile and lasting work on every significant area he published I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions have not changed?' Bertrand Russell This comprehensive anthology of Russell's writings brings together his definitive essays from the period 1903 to 1959. It covers the most fertile and lasting work on every significant area he published in. Whether from his seminal work in the philosophies of mathematics and language, or in his provocative views on religion and international relations, his wit and seemingly effortless lucidity remain constant throughout the development of his thinking. With over eighty essays divided eighty essays divided into seventeen sections, there could be no better introduction to the enormous scope of Russell's thinking or to the depth and brilliance of his genius.

30 review for The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (Routledge Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alok Mishra

    I won't say that Russell was the most elaborated philosopher of the 20th century. However, he was undoubtedly one of the most elaborated ones... This collection is a basic need for anyone who wants to understand the thoughts, writings and opinions of Bertrand on various subjects. I won't say that Russell was the most elaborated philosopher of the 20th century. However, he was undoubtedly one of the most elaborated ones... This collection is a basic need for anyone who wants to understand the thoughts, writings and opinions of Bertrand on various subjects.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien

    A+ Awesome collection of Bertrand Russell's essays, showcasing his incredible diversity of thought and interests. Political philosophy, economics, international diplomacy, science, history of philosophy, morality, religion and spirituality, mathematics, logic, etc etc, all of these are showcased in this collection. I'd only read an essay of his here an essay of his there before, so this was a wonderful deep dive into his works. Obviously in a collection of essays there will be some that are better A+ Awesome collection of Bertrand Russell's essays, showcasing his incredible diversity of thought and interests. Political philosophy, economics, international diplomacy, science, history of philosophy, morality, religion and spirituality, mathematics, logic, etc etc, all of these are showcased in this collection. I'd only read an essay of his here an essay of his there before, so this was a wonderful deep dive into his works. Obviously in a collection of essays there will be some that are better than others. Personally I had a bit of a harder time with the section of his essays about mathematics, it was above my head so harder to follow and understand. Also a few weaker essays and pieces that are a bit fluffy light on substance or one-dimensional, but those were absolutely the exception. But overall most of these essays are very accessible and readable. I love his methodology of thinking, the framework is built upon a deep reliance on logic and critical reasoning techniques. He has a clarity of thought and explanation, and an ability to perceive the layers beneath the layers, the subtleties of the issues, that is really quite extraordinary. Even if one doesn't agree with his final conclusions one can't help but admire his methodology and critical thinking skills. It is instructive and inspiring.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Lather

    Most important philosopher of the Twentieth Century

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    The mathematician who wins the Nobel Prize in literature. His writing is unique. He's the Hemingway of prose; keeps it simple, logical, and with the purpose of education for those not interested in wordy philosophical wind. Easy reading, frequently enlightening, and often very sly and witty. This collection is topically separated, and 800 pages long. Fun for casually picking through like a magazine. I prefer whole, unabridged books, but it's nice to have a giant paperweight/doorstop/boat anchor/ The mathematician who wins the Nobel Prize in literature. His writing is unique. He's the Hemingway of prose; keeps it simple, logical, and with the purpose of education for those not interested in wordy philosophical wind. Easy reading, frequently enlightening, and often very sly and witty. This collection is topically separated, and 800 pages long. Fun for casually picking through like a magazine. I prefer whole, unabridged books, but it's nice to have a giant paperweight/doorstop/boat anchor/missile weapon.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This is another long read, some 720 pages at roughly 550 words per page, yet well worth the investment of time. His Lordship was clearly one very intelligent person whose thoughts evolved with experience and who appeared to write with authentic convictions absent conflict of interest, a liberty facilitated through family wealth. So keen were his abilities that even a collection of unknown, underwhelming Swedish academics—a group that perplexingly receives great universal respect—agreed to confer This is another long read, some 720 pages at roughly 550 words per page, yet well worth the investment of time. His Lordship was clearly one very intelligent person whose thoughts evolved with experience and who appeared to write with authentic convictions absent conflict of interest, a liberty facilitated through family wealth. So keen were his abilities that even a collection of unknown, underwhelming Swedish academics—a group that perplexingly receives great universal respect—agreed to confer one of those Nobel Prizes in Literature on this man in 1950. The publishers of this volume presented 81 essays and excerpts from books that offer a spectrum of Lord Russell’s interests, including, autobiography, history, philosophy, mathematics, economics, politics, logic, sociology, education, psychology, and religion, most of which resonated resoundingly well with me. Even with this “basic” collection, my understanding was taxed at times, especially with the excerpts from the Principia Mathematica, written with Alfred North Whitehead between 1910 and 1913. Lord Russell reminds of the need for empirical investigation, while cautioning on the limits to truth; the scientific method of inquiry has its advantages, however, certainty is ultimately squishy. In practice, always avoid hasty, emotional conclusions, demand facts; or, in even more practical terms, wait until tomorrow to send that opinionated email, in which case it will most likely be deleted. In light of recent historical events in this country, the emphasize on logical thought is an undertaking well worth the effort. Without the threatening conflict between East and West and with the transfiguration of 19th century capitalism into an unsatisfying, though undoubtedly preferable, amalgam with socialism, if Lord Russell were alive today, where would he focus his attention? Since he devoted some time to criticizing Marx, now is likely a proper moment to add my own commentary. I observed in reading Das Kapital, especially volumes two and three, that Marx did not consider the risks inherent to the owners of capital, principally the risk of ruin, an oversight I previously noted in the commentary on Professor Popper’s The Open Society and Its Enemies. One reason for the surplus of labor concept is to satisfy a return to the owners of capital, which Marx never explicitly mentioned. Within that return is what modern finance practitioners know as the “risk premium.” To Marx, this was zero since owners of capital always profit; he would likely substitute a “greed premium.” Maybe this was because Marx equated owners of capital with landowners. Today, though, we know the owners of capital differently. What percent of small enterprises fail in some rather limited timeframe? Take a drive by your local strip mall and observe how many businesses have come and gone through the years, as one suggestion. Maybe you have a business idea. Go ahead and pursue that dream; let me know how that works out; yes, I’m guessing that everyone now has a tangible appreciation for financial risk. Moving beyond Marx, if we’re to tame today’s corporate realm, whatever its current -ism, it must be accomplished legislatively, for reasons apparent to anyone who has ever seen a company’s board of directors acting to fulfill its “fiduciary duties.” We the People decide those duties in this country and herein lies the rub, for two reasons. A social movement must promote a workable legislative agenda that effectively resolves the problematic componentry of corporate governance, requiring enlightened perspectives and sincere attempts to optimize outcomes for all, which I suspect are asks too great. Beyond that, though, lies the American political system, intrinsically beholden to the status quo in part through the campaign finance system, another structure in much need of repair. Another topic worthy of mention involves causality. I wish to read more on Lord Russell’s thoughts regarding the effects of randomness and our muddled sense of this word. We see this daily when society, or its proxy, the media, turns to credentialed persons, or worse, billionaires, for insight into our current concerns. I maintain many deserve far less attention, if any, than we wish to believe. We have, I think, an abysmal ability to parse statistics, time and space, likely owing to genetic priorities, and understandably so, since every species has much concern for the simple and immediate, not so much for the complex and distant future. Yet randomness, I suspect, accounts for a great degree of our destiny. Lord Russell noted the possible consequence to America had Henry VIII not fallen for Anne Boleyn, as just one example. We’re likely quite far from coming to terms with the effects of randomness on our collective progress. Reading Lord Russell permits my mind to oscillate in many important directions, all the while suggesting critical thinking that ultimately will lead to good decisions. This is most difficult in a world that propagates emotions so easily. I know I have fallen victim too many times already to regrettable decisions and am destined to do so again, despite my best intentions. Maybe if I keep Lord Russell’s words close by, I will do better.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Seamusin

    Bertrand Russell is perhaps my favourite thinker and writer of all time. Funny, erudite, brief, honest, so very knowledgeable, so very reasonable, and inquisitive about all the right stuff. You can follow him more or less in this book up from the foundations - logic and maths, philosophy, ethics, education and finally (sadly, but nobly) politics. Some people say beware of Russell's writings - especially the History of Western Philosophy - they're full of bias. Well I feel all the richer for seei Bertrand Russell is perhaps my favourite thinker and writer of all time. Funny, erudite, brief, honest, so very knowledgeable, so very reasonable, and inquisitive about all the right stuff. You can follow him more or less in this book up from the foundations - logic and maths, philosophy, ethics, education and finally (sadly, but nobly) politics. Some people say beware of Russell's writings - especially the History of Western Philosophy - they're full of bias. Well I feel all the richer for seeing further inside his mind. Don't really know how to rate the book though. While I adore his writing, I don't really adore this specific collection. 'Basic Writings' does not equal 'Important Writings' as I found out. The only pieces I would unequivocally recommend are those in the first two sections: Autobiographical Asides, and The Nobel Prize Winning Man of Letters. A brilliant mix of informal autobiography and history and ramble on philosophy. The rest it seems are perhaps less worthwhile reading than his full books - unless you've already read them all and are a fan-girl...

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Withun

    -

  8. 5 out of 5

    SSShafiq

    Jan 2021 My brother studies philosophy and has promised this is an easy intro... however looking at his shelves I am deeply suspicious Deeply ... and a little scared ...

  9. 4 out of 5

    ZaRi

    Aristotle, in spite of his reputation, is full of absurdities. He says that children should be conceived in the Winter, when the wind is in the North, and that if people marry too young the children will be female. He tells us that the blood of females is blacker then that of males; that the pig is the only animal liable to measles; that an elephant suffering from insomnia should have its shoulders rubbed with salt, olive-oil, and warm water; that women have fewer teeth than men, and so on. Neve Aristotle, in spite of his reputation, is full of absurdities. He says that children should be conceived in the Winter, when the wind is in the North, and that if people marry too young the children will be female. He tells us that the blood of females is blacker then that of males; that the pig is the only animal liable to measles; that an elephant suffering from insomnia should have its shoulders rubbed with salt, olive-oil, and warm water; that women have fewer teeth than men, and so on. Nevertheless, he is considered by the great majority of philosophers a paragon of wisdom.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erik Hoel

    Many of the sections were not as long as I would have liked, but as an lifelong overview of the author's work/thought, in the author's own words, it is perfect. Many of the sections were not as long as I would have liked, but as an lifelong overview of the author's work/thought, in the author's own words, it is perfect.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Younie

    There is wit, passion and a thoughtfulness throughout all the writings of Bertrand Russell contained within this collection of work. His style is engaging and provocative, intentionally so, as he seeks to challenge his readers to re-examine treasured beliefs and methods of living. He, however, also constantly demonstrates accompanying keenness to communicate his position as clearly as possible; indeed, he outlines in an early essay on his writing style his determination to always state his posit There is wit, passion and a thoughtfulness throughout all the writings of Bertrand Russell contained within this collection of work. His style is engaging and provocative, intentionally so, as he seeks to challenge his readers to re-examine treasured beliefs and methods of living. He, however, also constantly demonstrates accompanying keenness to communicate his position as clearly as possible; indeed, he outlines in an early essay on his writing style his determination to always state his position in as few and simple words as possible. This is evident throughout – however, despite Russell’s best efforts, his essays summarising his works as a logician remained impenetrable. I fear however this was a fault of my own understanding, and cannot be blamed on the author. As a primer for the beliefs, theories, and musings of one of the great thinkers of the 20th century, this book is invaluable. The essays, articles, and book excerpts range across a dizzying array of subjects which attracted Russell’s interests, and, while not claiming expertise in some subjects, he still stimulates the mind and encourages a longing in the reader for greater understanding, a feeling obviously contained within Russell. On subjects upon which he does have expertise, however, his writing reaches incredible heights; he disseminates information, challenges and then deconstructs positions and establishes his own thoughts with mastery I have encountered elsewhere rarely. As if that wasn’t enough, he does all this while still maintaining a wit and elegant humour other writers often lack. Russell’s most stirring and, to my mind, most interesting pieces are those in which he delivers his most strident criticisms. The four concepts which he devotes entire essays to addressing, and indeed are critiqued in several other pieces, stand testament to his philosophical and moral opposition to an absence of introspection, skepticism and critical thought. Communism, religion, undue desire for wealth and a predisposition towards violence stand as pillars of received and unchallenged thought which, to Russell’s mind, are root causes in much of the unhappiness experienced by humans, and can be readily alleviated. From his many, many addresses contained within these collected writings against these four, and other like them, I postulate that Russell’s philosophy seem grounded in self-reinforcing concepts of knowledge and empathy, the solution to, in Russell’s eyes, humanities suffering. He values knowledge for its illumination of our own potential and the fulfilled lives we can lead but also because it allows us to understand other people, and live in harmony with them. Empathy as being a result of knowledge is referred to constantly in his essays on the study of history as he believes, rightly, that it is necessary to understanding people’s situations, and why their lives have developed in the way they have. Knowledge thus enables this understanding, and leads to empathy. This concept is evident in the reverse as well – Russell demonstrates throughout that from others we gain key knowledge and, vitally, critique of our own beliefs and the spur to conduct internal criticism, while also providing the opportunity for others to do the same. From these two concepts and their interaction come the conditions of living which Russell, in my understanding of his work (which is admittedly limited to this, a collection of his ‘basic writings’), believes to be best. Lives which are consumed with peaceable and social interaction with a devotion to creativity and the pursuit of knowledge, and a healthy degree of scepticism, both of one’s own beliefs and those of others.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Priyanka Suresh

    What a fantastic book! Would recommend exploring the book from the index - find a topic of your interest, read that essay and repeat. The prose is straightforward, articulate and beautiful. Backstory - I read an essay called "Knowledge and wisdom" by Russell when I was in school, loved it so much I learned it word for word. Fast forward to now, wanted to explore his other essays and I am not disappointed. Would recommend to anyone at any age with any interest. 800 pages of pure fun with thought- What a fantastic book! Would recommend exploring the book from the index - find a topic of your interest, read that essay and repeat. The prose is straightforward, articulate and beautiful. Backstory - I read an essay called "Knowledge and wisdom" by Russell when I was in school, loved it so much I learned it word for word. Fast forward to now, wanted to explore his other essays and I am not disappointed. Would recommend to anyone at any age with any interest. 800 pages of pure fun with thought-provoking, readable, modern philosophy essays. Couldn't get enough.

  13. 5 out of 5

    E. G.

    Introduction by John G. Slater Preface by Bertrand Russell Introduction by the Editors Epigrammatic Insights from the pen of Russell Chronological List of Russell's Principle Works Chronology of the Life of Bertrand Russell Acknowledgements Some Thoughts about Bertrand Russell Autobiographical Asides --My Religious Reminiscences --My Mental Development --Adaptation: An Autobiographical Epitome --Why I Took to Philosophy The Nobel Prize Winning Man of Letters (Essayist and Short Story Writer) --How I Write --A Introduction by John G. Slater Preface by Bertrand Russell Introduction by the Editors Epigrammatic Insights from the pen of Russell Chronological List of Russell's Principle Works Chronology of the Life of Bertrand Russell Acknowledgements Some Thoughts about Bertrand Russell Autobiographical Asides --My Religious Reminiscences --My Mental Development --Adaptation: An Autobiographical Epitome --Why I Took to Philosophy The Nobel Prize Winning Man of Letters (Essayist and Short Story Writer) --How I Write --A Free Man's Worship --An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish --The Metaphysician's Nightmare: Retro Me Satanas The Philosopher of Language --Language --Sentences, Syntax, and Parts of Speech --The Uses of Language --The Cult of 'Common Usage' The Logician and Philosopher of Mathematics --Symbolic Logic --On Induction --Preface to Principia Mathematica --Introduction to Principia Mathematica --Summary of Part III, Principia Mathematica --Summary of Part IV, Principia Mathematica --Summary of Part V, Principia Mathematica --Summary of Part VI, Principia Mathematica --Introduction to the Second Edition, Principia Mathematica --Mathematics and Logic --The Validity of Inference --Dewey's New Logic --John Dewey The Epistemologist --Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description --Theory of Knowledge --Epistemological Premisses The Metaphysician --Materialism, Past and Present --Language and Metaphysics --The Retreat from Pythagoras The Historian of Philosophy --Philosophy in the Twentieth Century --Aristotle's Logic --St Thomas Aquinas --Currents of Thought in the Nineteenth Century --The Philosophy of Logical Analysis The Psychologist --Psychological and Physical Causal Laws --Truth and Falsehood --Knowledge Behaviouristically Considered The Moral Philosopher --Styles in Ethics --The Place of Sex Among Human Values --Individual and Social Ethics --'What I Believe' --The Expanding Mental Universe The Philosopher of Education --Education --The Aims of Education --Emotion and Discipline --The Functions of a Teacher The Philosopher of Politics --The Reconciliation of Individuality and Citizenship --Philosophy and Politics --Politically Important Desires --Why I am not a Communist The Philosopher in the Field of Economics --Property --Dialectical Materialism --The Theory of Surplus Value The Philosopher of History --On History --The Materialistic Theory of History --History as an Art The Philosopher of Culture: East and West --Chinese and Western Civilization Contrasted --Eastern and Western Ideals of Happiness The Philosopher of Religion --The Essence of Religion --What is an Agnostic? --Why I am not a Christian --Can Religion Cure our Troubles? The Philosopher and Expositor of Science --Physics and Neutral Monism --Science and Education --Limitations of Scientific Method --The New Physics and Relativity --Science and Values --Non-Demonstrative Inference The Analyst of International Affairs --The Taming of Power --If We are to Survive this Dark Time--- --What Would Help Mankind Most? --Current Perplexities --World Government --The Next Half-Century --Life Without Fear --Science and Human Life --Open Letter to Eisenhower and Khrushchev --Man's Peril --Methods of Settling Disputes in the Nuclear Age Index

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad

    I owe innumerable happy hours to reading of this book by Russell, something which I can’t say of any other contemporary scientific writer. Although, he’s best known to the general public for his views on religion, a topic which engaged his attention from boyhood onward, he nevertheless is without a question one of the most productive and most brilliant thinkers of our age.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Augusto Barros

    I haven't read it all, it's more like a good reference and quotes source when you are looking for a smart and reasonable way of looking into our biggest issues. Bertrand Russell was certainly one of the greatest minds of the last century. I haven't read it all, it's more like a good reference and quotes source when you are looking for a smart and reasonable way of looking into our biggest issues. Bertrand Russell was certainly one of the greatest minds of the last century.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jihad Lahham

    while i did not get into "logic" or "principia mathematica", i loved everything in this book. it's a big book and a heavy read but it's broken down in sections which makes it easier to read over a long period of time. while i did not get into "logic" or "principia mathematica", i loved everything in this book. it's a big book and a heavy read but it's broken down in sections which makes it easier to read over a long period of time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Good old common sense....one of the most important thinkers of the 20th century...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Volkan

    favorite section of the book was "an outline of intellectual rubbish". favorite section of the book was "an outline of intellectual rubbish".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Pinnock

    Well worth the read. A controversial but hugely intelligent figure.

  20. 5 out of 5

    William

    Russell, as a free thinker revolutionized modern philosophy. Using logic and reason rather than faith and dogma, in all his arguments he strips away the idea of faith.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marko Zbodulja

    Amazing collection of essays and nice introduction to the work of Bertrand Russell, one of my greatest heroes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dozy Pilchard

    Great anthology, except my edition has no index which makes it less useful than it would otherwise be for research.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jackson Cyril

    If for no other reason, one should read Russell to learn how to write with immense wit and enjoyment without abandoning depth of thought: a must-read for all aspiring writers.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    I enjoyed reading some of Russell's essays. He wrote in an understandable language though his thinking is at a great depth of reasoning. I enjoyed reading some of Russell's essays. He wrote in an understandable language though his thinking is at a great depth of reasoning.

  25. 5 out of 5

    eesenor

    This is a useful collection of Russell's influential pieces on a variety of topics. This is a useful collection of Russell's influential pieces on a variety of topics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hyder

    An impressive compendium of short essays from one of my favourite thinkers from the 20th century.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Radu Giurgiu

    Bertrand Russell is one of my all-time thinkers. I first read his novels on happiness, sceptical essays and in praise of idleness. These are more for lay-persons. He has a brilliant way of writing, and I barely refrain from highlighting every single paragraph. That's why I put my hands on this compilation on different topics and throughout his career. Because it is a collection of Russell's work, you cna skip parts that you are not interested or are too technical. I read everything although I en Bertrand Russell is one of my all-time thinkers. I first read his novels on happiness, sceptical essays and in praise of idleness. These are more for lay-persons. He has a brilliant way of writing, and I barely refrain from highlighting every single paragraph. That's why I put my hands on this compilation on different topics and throughout his career. Because it is a collection of Russell's work, you cna skip parts that you are not interested or are too technical. I read everything although I enjoyed more his thoughts on things like education, economy r politics, then the technical description of language and logic. But I was still in awe of his mind in the parts that made him famous. It was also interesting to read how big of an influence was the cold war on his latest work. His articles are very timely, and I would love to see what he thinks now that the cold war is over, the communism almost completely defeated, but other threats are knocking on humanity's door. Always a pleasure to read Bernardt Russell's articles and books so I strongly recommend reading this impressive collection.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adel ALRAI

    Great writing. Great ideas. A great approach toward pointing out to many issues of his time that we are still suffering from. That, in particular, made me very disappointed in us, humans. Why? Because of the many persistent problems of his time, e.g. about education, religion, politics, etc, that he pointed out are still the core issues of our societies, today. As much as I enjoyed the book, there were times (like really on many occasions across the book) where I understood nothing because it wa Great writing. Great ideas. A great approach toward pointing out to many issues of his time that we are still suffering from. That, in particular, made me very disappointed in us, humans. Why? Because of the many persistent problems of his time, e.g. about education, religion, politics, etc, that he pointed out are still the core issues of our societies, today. As much as I enjoyed the book, there were times (like really on many occasions across the book) where I understood nothing because it was just a pure philosophy and, perhaps, meant to be understood by those who only studied philosophy at one point in their lives, or just by elite philosophers. Though the book is so fat and it is difficult to understand sometimes, it contains many interesting and relevant topics. The one that made me ponder for quite some time is children education. I sure do look forward to reading more of his books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Héctor Mata

    Lucid and witty argument. Somewhat dated, but still a very fine collection. A handful of essays on mathematical logic and philosophy of language were very tough reads, but this is somewhat unavoidable for those subjects. The breadth and scope of Russell's thinking is intimidating, ranging from philosophy of science to mathematics, physics, politics and economics. This selection includes classics such as Why I am not a Christian and What I Believe. It is remarkable that these two in particular we Lucid and witty argument. Somewhat dated, but still a very fine collection. A handful of essays on mathematical logic and philosophy of language were very tough reads, but this is somewhat unavoidable for those subjects. The breadth and scope of Russell's thinking is intimidating, ranging from philosophy of science to mathematics, physics, politics and economics. This selection includes classics such as Why I am not a Christian and What I Believe. It is remarkable that these two in particular were written (and published!) in the 1920's--I suspect they are still controversial to many modern eyes. Russell was way ahead of his time and, to me at least, hugely underrated. This collection is a pretty good place to start getting acquainted with his writing and thinking.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Roy McCullough

    A hefty and comprehensive anthology of Russell’s essays. Includes some true gems and classics and others that (at least to me) are a bit more obscure. Best read, reflected upon, and absorbed in small doses.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...