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Sandman: Dream Hunters

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THE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS is a comics adaptation of Gaiman's original prose novella by the same name illustrated by Yoshitako Amano. This graphic novel was illustrated by the legendary P. Craig Russell. A humble young monk and a magical, shape-changing fox find themselves romantically drawn together. As their love blooms, the fox learns of a devilish plot by a group o THE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS is a comics adaptation of Gaiman's original prose novella by the same name illustrated by Yoshitako Amano. This graphic novel was illustrated by the legendary P. Craig Russell. A humble young monk and a magical, shape-changing fox find themselves romantically drawn together. As their love blooms, the fox learns of a devilish plot by a group of demons and a Japanese emperor to steal the monk's life. With the aid of Morpheus, the fox must use all of her cunning and creative thinking to foil this evil scheme and save the man that she loves.


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THE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS is a comics adaptation of Gaiman's original prose novella by the same name illustrated by Yoshitako Amano. This graphic novel was illustrated by the legendary P. Craig Russell. A humble young monk and a magical, shape-changing fox find themselves romantically drawn together. As their love blooms, the fox learns of a devilish plot by a group o THE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS is a comics adaptation of Gaiman's original prose novella by the same name illustrated by Yoshitako Amano. This graphic novel was illustrated by the legendary P. Craig Russell. A humble young monk and a magical, shape-changing fox find themselves romantically drawn together. As their love blooms, the fox learns of a devilish plot by a group of demons and a Japanese emperor to steal the monk's life. With the aid of Morpheus, the fox must use all of her cunning and creative thinking to foil this evil scheme and save the man that she loves.

30 review for Sandman: Dream Hunters

  1. 4 out of 5

    MischaS_

    Perfect, all I want now is a fox. It was such a cutie! Loved the story, it was a bit unusually but still amazing. But I missed the Sandman a bit, wish he was more present.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I read all the volumes of The Sandman and loved it but this is a spinoff work, published in 2009, a fable of a monk and a fox set in “old Japan,” that has the feel of something Gaiman adapted from a centuries old myth, but in fact was invented whole cloth all by his lonesome. And Japan is a good place for a story of this mythological complexity, because it is a country and culture steeped in mythologies and monsters, in a belief in yokai. The Dream Hunters focuses on a monk and two spirit creatu I read all the volumes of The Sandman and loved it but this is a spinoff work, published in 2009, a fable of a monk and a fox set in “old Japan,” that has the feel of something Gaiman adapted from a centuries old myth, but in fact was invented whole cloth all by his lonesome. And Japan is a good place for a story of this mythological complexity, because it is a country and culture steeped in mythologies and monsters, in a belief in yokai. The Dream Hunters focuses on a monk and two spirit creatures in the form of a badger and a fox who want to oust the monk from his abode. They set up a bet that they both lose, but the fox also loses her heart to the monk in the bargain. The master of demons also wants to usurp the power of the monk, and the fox-spirit intervenes on the monk’s behalf, but Morpheus, the Dream Himself (from the Sandman) intervenes. The Dream Hunters was first written by Gaiman as a novella, illustrated by Yoshitako Amano; it has blossomed into a wonderful graphic novel. The story is beautifully written, but it is more than matched by the amazing P. Craig Russell’s artwork, drawing on influences from Asian art (particularly woodblock prints) and European Art Noveau (particularly the work of Aphonse Mucha) to early Disney. The coloring by Lovern Kindzierski is also lovely, muted, with an ancient woodblock feel to it. This is a stand-alone volume, doesn’t require you know the whole of The Sandman to appreciate its subtle beauties.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    A quite enjoyable tale with a classic moral transcending the Oriental flavor, with cameos from a few of our favorite Sandman characters, including Dream, himself. The art is, I believe, much better than most of the previous Sandman series, with clean lines and beautiful images, but that's also a taste of the thematic style, so obviously it was intentional on every level and not just an improvement on the series which is ostensibly ended... (but not quite, obviously.) :) It was fun and light, with A quite enjoyable tale with a classic moral transcending the Oriental flavor, with cameos from a few of our favorite Sandman characters, including Dream, himself. The art is, I believe, much better than most of the previous Sandman series, with clean lines and beautiful images, but that's also a taste of the thematic style, so obviously it was intentional on every level and not just an improvement on the series which is ostensibly ended... (but not quite, obviously.) :) It was fun and light, with all the trappings of trickery, love, dreams, and revenge. A fairy tale with a moral? Sure! And it may deserve to be a classic and an ideal. :)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Another one of P. Craig Russell's adaptations of Gaiman's prose. I'm not sure why he's so obsessed with converting all of Gaiman's words to comics, but I'm glad he is. This was wonderful. Russell brings a different look to what was originally an illustrated novella. He gets how to adapt words into panels telling Gaiman's story visually when he can, removing a lot of the exposition that can really bog down a comic. Another one of P. Craig Russell's adaptations of Gaiman's prose. I'm not sure why he's so obsessed with converting all of Gaiman's words to comics, but I'm glad he is. This was wonderful. Russell brings a different look to what was originally an illustrated novella. He gets how to adapt words into panels telling Gaiman's story visually when he can, removing a lot of the exposition that can really bog down a comic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Neil Gaiman wrote a Japanese fable and apparently fooled a bunch of fans and academics, who all believed he had adapted an actual folk tale within his Sandman universe. Even his illustrator, the amazing P. Craig Russell thought this was just a really seamless absorption of a Japanese story into Morpheus' realm, but nope, it's 100% Gaiman. I read a lot of zen fairy tales when I began reading about Buddhism years ago, and while I am no expert, I can see why readers were fooled: the tone, rhythm an Neil Gaiman wrote a Japanese fable and apparently fooled a bunch of fans and academics, who all believed he had adapted an actual folk tale within his Sandman universe. Even his illustrator, the amazing P. Craig Russell thought this was just a really seamless absorption of a Japanese story into Morpheus' realm, but nope, it's 100% Gaiman. I read a lot of zen fairy tales when I began reading about Buddhism years ago, and while I am no expert, I can see why readers were fooled: the tone, rhythm and motif of the story within this lovely comic's pages are that strange and beautiful blend of whimsical and heartbreaking that are a trademark of many of Japanese folk tales. A fox and a badger make a wager: if they can get a young, solitary monk to leave his tiny, remote temple, they will share his humble abode, as it is more comfortable than their dens. They try to fool the monk into leaving, but he sees through their deceptions. The badger eventually gives up, but the fox becomes unexpectedly attached to the young man, and when she hears demons whisper about a plan to kill him through his dreams, she undertakes a long journey to try to save the man she loves. I cried reading this. It was a precious and tragic love story, illustrated in a style reminiscent of traditional Japanese water colors, but with Art Nouveau curves and stunning colors. Its a wonderful addition to the Sandman cannon, as well as a great little standalone story. Any fan of the series will enjoy this, as will anyone who enjoys Gaiman's work or who simply loves old folk tales... even if they are not 100% authentic...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I'll be honest; the story in this book does not rank amongst my favourite Gaiman tales... although, please understand me, 'bad' Gaiman is still better than most other writers. I don't know why, but it just didn't connect with me like most of Neil's work does. The artwork, on the other hand... wow. P. Craig Russell's work is always great but in this book he doesn't just take it to the next level but a couple more levels after that. Wearing its dual inspirations of ancient Japanese art and art nouv I'll be honest; the story in this book does not rank amongst my favourite Gaiman tales... although, please understand me, 'bad' Gaiman is still better than most other writers. I don't know why, but it just didn't connect with me like most of Neil's work does. The artwork, on the other hand... wow. P. Craig Russell's work is always great but in this book he doesn't just take it to the next level but a couple more levels after that. Wearing its dual inspirations of ancient Japanese art and art nouveau design and illustration affectionately on its sleeve, this book does nothing short of dazzle. Very impressive work, Mr. Russell. The colour art is gorgeous too, although I am ashamed to say I've already forgotten the colourist's name. My memory is shockingly bad for names...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    P. Craig Russell is one of my favorite comic artists. He's known for his adaptions of classic plays and operas. He's also adapted a bunch of Neil Gaiman stories including Coraline. I'm not sure why Russell likes adapting Gaiman so much. I prefer his adaptions of older stories, but the setting of this story actually works really well for Russell's style. Although technically a Sandman story, this can certainly be read without involving that lengthy series. It could be considered a story in that u P. Craig Russell is one of my favorite comic artists. He's known for his adaptions of classic plays and operas. He's also adapted a bunch of Neil Gaiman stories including Coraline. I'm not sure why Russell likes adapting Gaiman so much. I prefer his adaptions of older stories, but the setting of this story actually works really well for Russell's style. Although technically a Sandman story, this can certainly be read without involving that lengthy series. It could be considered a story in that universe, and not an essential piece of it. Apparently Russell himself believed Dream Hunters wasn't an original story but rather a Sandman re-writing of a classic Japanese parable. But, in reality this story was created purely from Gaiman's imagination. I feel like there is a strong connection to Aesop's parables and even Jim Henson's The Storyteller (but don't quote me on that one). The true star of the book is Russell's gift of adaption. He does a fantastic job of converting sentences and paragraphs into comic panels. His incorporation of larger chunks of text avoids the usual issues associated with text in comics. The pages never feel bogged down, and the story's pace is kept even throughout. Russell has a unique line, and I love his jagged edged look for angry and scary creatures. He does a fantastic job of showing emotion in the panels. My complaint with the art is the coloring. The color uses this faux-painted look that at worst ends up looking like a wall painted with Windows Paint gradient colors. It doesn't distract too much, and sometimes does look nice - I believe the attempt was to make the book look like it was created with old Japanese silk paintings. The colors are done by Russell's longtime collaborator Lovern Kindzierski who besides for that effect I dislike does a wonderful job as usual. I've been reading a lot of of Mizuki's manga which deals with Japanese Folklore and Yokai. I think the ancient Japanese setting is a wonderful place to tell this story and for two Western creators they do a great job.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    As a huge Sandman fan, I’m pretty easy to please, but this was wonderful. Sandman: The Dream Hunters is an adaptation of a short story that Neil Gaiman wrote that combined both Dream from Sandman and Asian fairytale elements. Dream Hunters is the story of a monk and a fox who go to great lengths for each other. The monk is minding his own business at his temple when both a fox and a badger try to convince him to move along and free up the nice spot. The ways in which they tried to persuade the mo As a huge Sandman fan, I’m pretty easy to please, but this was wonderful. Sandman: The Dream Hunters is an adaptation of a short story that Neil Gaiman wrote that combined both Dream from Sandman and Asian fairytale elements. Dream Hunters is the story of a monk and a fox who go to great lengths for each other. The monk is minding his own business at his temple when both a fox and a badger try to convince him to move along and free up the nice spot. The ways in which they tried to persuade the monk were pretty entertaining and the interaction between the monk and the fox later on when the monk's life is in danger was heartwarming. Even though things don’t end up exactly as planned (when do they ever in a Gaiman story?) I loved every second of it. The artwork is fantastic and perfectly fits the story. It’s very reminiscent of old Japanese woodcut artwork. Most of all, I got to see Dream again! God I love that character so much. I would’ve read it for that alone. If you’re a Sandman fan, this is worth reading as a chance to get to see Dream again. And even if you’re not, it’s a great little fairytale and one I’d definitely recommend! And if you get a chance, check out the artwork they have in there from Yuko Shimizu, it’s pretty incredible:

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    🦊 It was interesting to read both versions of this story so close together. At first I had thought I might not be as engaged with this one because I've not longed finished the story really, but I loved how different it was, and P. Craig Russell's take on it swept me away as well. Both versions felt worthwhile and I really liked seeing how two drastically different artistic styles can make a story feel fresh and new. 🦊 It was interesting to read both versions of this story so close together. At first I had thought I might not be as engaged with this one because I've not longed finished the story really, but I loved how different it was, and P. Craig Russell's take on it swept me away as well. Both versions felt worthwhile and I really liked seeing how two drastically different artistic styles can make a story feel fresh and new.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Oh my goodness. I think my heart has just stopped! Sandman: The Dream Hunters is a superb addition to the Sandman canon and once again, shows us the literary storytelling genius of Neil Gaiman. P. Craig Russell also deserves whole-hearted praise for his depiction of a Gaiman classic tale focusing on the love between a fox (who adopts the form of a beautiful woman) and a monk. The story is heart-breaking at times and focuses on the real meanings behind love, devotion, faith and life. Honestly, this Oh my goodness. I think my heart has just stopped! Sandman: The Dream Hunters is a superb addition to the Sandman canon and once again, shows us the literary storytelling genius of Neil Gaiman. P. Craig Russell also deserves whole-hearted praise for his depiction of a Gaiman classic tale focusing on the love between a fox (who adopts the form of a beautiful woman) and a monk. The story is heart-breaking at times and focuses on the real meanings behind love, devotion, faith and life. Honestly, this is a beautifully simple tale full of Gaiman's rich vocabulary and endless imagination, illustrated perfectly by Russell. I honestly think this is a writer/illustrator marriage made in heaven. They both complement each other so well and I feel privileged to be able to read, share and delight in the enchanting worlds they create. May their reign long continue! I also thank Gaiman for pointing out in the afterword that Russell has also illustrated Oscar Wilde's short stories which I shall definitely have to get my hands on soon. Both men are simply geniuses.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lancelot Schaubert

    I'm not quite sure, but this might actually be my favorite story in all of Sandman? Perhaps it's simply because it's self-contained, has a solid through line, and seems not to get ahead of itself. I really loved the feel of the love story and the magic and mysticism. It's... everything that Sandman has going well for it without any of the significant drawbacks. I'm not quite sure, but this might actually be my favorite story in all of Sandman? Perhaps it's simply because it's self-contained, has a solid through line, and seems not to get ahead of itself. I really loved the feel of the love story and the magic and mysticism. It's... everything that Sandman has going well for it without any of the significant drawbacks.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    This is a wonderful comic adaptation illustrated by P. Craig Russell, released a decade after the original illustrated novella, which I read last year. Neil had fans and academics fooled (Russell and myself included)—everyone believed he had adapted an old Japanese fable to fit into his Sandman universe, while he had in fact entirely made it up. Knowing this, the story itself is even more brilliant and awe-inspiring in its faux authenticity. I bought it hook, line, and sinker, I really did. Whil This is a wonderful comic adaptation illustrated by P. Craig Russell, released a decade after the original illustrated novella, which I read last year. Neil had fans and academics fooled (Russell and myself included)—everyone believed he had adapted an old Japanese fable to fit into his Sandman universe, while he had in fact entirely made it up. Knowing this, the story itself is even more brilliant and awe-inspiring in its faux authenticity. I bought it hook, line, and sinker, I really did. While the artwork is lovely and complements the story, I’m detracting a star because I didn’t really get anything new from this version. The original novella is already beautifully illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano, and while Sandman was always at home in the graphic novel world, I find that the original format chosen for this particular story works better. ————— My other ડꪖꪀᦔꪑꪖꪀ reviews: 01: Preludes & Nocturnes · ★★★½ 02: The Doll's House · ★★★★ 03: Dream Country · ★★★ 04: Season of Mists · ★★★★½ 05: A Game of You · ★★★½ 06: Fables and Reflections · ★★★½ 07: Brief Lives · ★★★★½ 08: Worlds' End · ★★★ 09: The Kindly Ones · ★★★★★ 10: The Wake · ★★★ Overture · ★★★ Endless Nights · ★★★★ Death: The Deluxe Edition · ★★★★ Audible Original #1 · ★★★★★ The Sandman Universe · The Dreaming: Pathways and Emanations · ★★ The Sandman Universe · Lucifer: The Infernal Comedy · ★

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rosa

    Even though the story is based on a tale from Gaiman's head, it completely reads like a Japanese fairy tale. The story is a beautiful unrequited romance and the illustrations are gorgeous. I also like how the ending is left a little bit open, so that the reader can hope they ended up together. Even though the story is based on a tale from Gaiman's head, it completely reads like a Japanese fairy tale. The story is a beautiful unrequited romance and the illustrations are gorgeous. I also like how the ending is left a little bit open, so that the reader can hope they ended up together.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophie (BlameChocolate) *on hiatus*

    The Dream Hunters was beautiful. I have no words to describe just how beautiful it was. Both in the stellar writing by Neil Gaiman, who has yet to disappoint me, and the marvellous art by Craig Russell. The two of them combined could not have created anything more brilliant. As a lover of Japan and everything mythology, I was pleasantly surprised when I learned the plot was about both. I went into this graphic novel blind, having not previously read the famously acclaimed Sandman books and knowin The Dream Hunters was beautiful. I have no words to describe just how beautiful it was. Both in the stellar writing by Neil Gaiman, who has yet to disappoint me, and the marvellous art by Craig Russell. The two of them combined could not have created anything more brilliant. As a lover of Japan and everything mythology, I was pleasantly surprised when I learned the plot was about both. I went into this graphic novel blind, having not previously read the famously acclaimed Sandman books and knowing virtually nothing about the story. So I can only speak for this one installment. It's about a tragic forbidden love, pain, revenge, and lessons learned. Everything that could make my heart flutter and constrict in all the right places. And even after a good night's sleep, I still can't shake this story out of my head - it was so sinfully whole and satisfying. The writing was melodic and fairy-tale like, strange, brutal, unapologetic - very Gaiman, very lovely. The art was not too vibrant, reminescent of 17th/18th/19th century Japanese drawings but never close enough to lose the modern reader's attention. It also had some Art Noveau and Disney influence in places, which can sound contradictory and a royal mess, but the three tied together made for absolute perfection. To say any more would spoil the experience. You need to read this and take it in and want to cry and laugh and hug it to yourself, because you're a sappy mess of a person. The only reason I'm not giving it 5 stars is because I needed and wanted more and even if it feels like the perfect length (theoretically) it's also incredibly short at the same time. I also feel like I didn't know enough about this world and the characters to fully appreciate it. I'd probably have to read Sandman first. ~ 4.5 stars ~ This book grants an Acceptable (A) grade in Muggle Studies (N.E.W.T.s) and thus concludes my Readathon! ~

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

    I read this to compare with the original illustrated narrative version of Dream Hunters. It was good, but not as good as the first. It really started to work for me in the second half of the book the though. At the point where you see the monk's dream, Russel cut out all the narrative for this part and did the entire dream with only the pictures to speak. It was really well done. The afterword was very enlightening. Neil Gaiman admits that he never meant anyone to take the afterword of the origin I read this to compare with the original illustrated narrative version of Dream Hunters. It was good, but not as good as the first. It really started to work for me in the second half of the book the though. At the point where you see the monk's dream, Russel cut out all the narrative for this part and did the entire dream with only the pictures to speak. It was really well done. The afterword was very enlightening. Neil Gaiman admits that he never meant anyone to take the afterword of the original version seriously. In other words, there was never any Japanese fairy tale called "The Monk and the Fox" and he didn't base it on those stories. He took many different parts of Japanese mythology and incorporated them into his story, but those were independently researched. Well, he had me fooled, as you can see by my review of the original book. I even tried to look up the story he referenced (as did a lot of other people apparently) and when I couldn't find it, I was a little bummed. Isn't it appropriate that I read this on April Fool's Day? I'm leaving my original review untouched as a reminder that authors are nothing more than really good liars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    James

    3.5 stars. This was pretty good. A story about duty, love and revenge. Well told with some wonderful art. This book could have easily achieved 4 stars but it had one of those ambiguous endings that I’m not the fondest of.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arnis

    https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201... https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Warman

    Gaiman's "Sandman" universe is exquisite. I really enjoyed this graphic novel and am encouraged to read the others. For Gaiman experts, is there a correct order to read these? Gaiman's "Sandman" universe is exquisite. I really enjoyed this graphic novel and am encouraged to read the others. For Gaiman experts, is there a correct order to read these?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    This is an adaptation of Neil Gaiman's 1999 illustrated novella, The Sandman: The Dream Hunters. The novella, an invented Japanese folktale with some Sandman elements thrown in, is excellent. P. Craig Russell turned the story into a four issue comic miniseries, which is collected in this volume. The story - which appears to be pretty much copy/pasted from the novella - remains strong. And Russell's artwork is well done and does a good job of complementing the story. However, I'm not really sure This is an adaptation of Neil Gaiman's 1999 illustrated novella, The Sandman: The Dream Hunters. The novella, an invented Japanese folktale with some Sandman elements thrown in, is excellent. P. Craig Russell turned the story into a four issue comic miniseries, which is collected in this volume. The story - which appears to be pretty much copy/pasted from the novella - remains strong. And Russell's artwork is well done and does a good job of complementing the story. However, I'm not really sure who I would ever recommend this to. I can appreciate how a comic adaptation can present a familiar story in new and exciting ways by adding a visual element; the outstanding Dark Tower comics series is a good example of this. However, while the original novella version of this story is not in comic form, it is illustrated - gorgeously - by Yoshitaka Amano, and overall the illustrated novella format seems to fit this story best. Ultimately, while this is a nice adaptation I would urge readers interested in this story to seek out the original novella instead. 3.5 stars, recommended for Sandman completionists only.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Darcy Roar

    Gaiman and Russell make such beautiful work together and this is no exception. A lovely little standalone story in the world of the Endless where Dream, or the King of All Night's Dreaming as he is known here, councils a fox and a monk, and lesson are learned all around. Vivid and dreamy in the way all of Gaiman's fairy tales are, and bittersweet too. Absolutely worth an hour or two of your time. Gaiman and Russell make such beautiful work together and this is no exception. A lovely little standalone story in the world of the Endless where Dream, or the King of All Night's Dreaming as he is known here, councils a fox and a monk, and lesson are learned all around. Vivid and dreamy in the way all of Gaiman's fairy tales are, and bittersweet too. Absolutely worth an hour or two of your time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I have both versions of this illustrated story. The text is largely similar (partially adapted for Russell's version) in both fairy stories, but with different illustrators. Both versions are equally beautiful in their own way, and the story itself is lovely and ethereal. I have both versions of this illustrated story. The text is largely similar (partially adapted for Russell's version) in both fairy stories, but with different illustrators. Both versions are equally beautiful in their own way, and the story itself is lovely and ethereal.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Suleyman Gedik

    One of the best Sandman stories I have read. A must read for Sandman fans and fantasy and mythology lovers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Viktoria

    Nothing is done entirely for nothing. Nothing is wasted. You are older, and you have made decisions, and you are not the fox you were yesterday. Take what you have learned, and move on.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Grazielle Ernestine

    unexpected intrusions of beauty. like being in a dream in a dream, in a dream... so rich in both story, culture, legends and other mysteries only Gaiman can come up and surprise you with. i feel so privileged to have read this story, thankyou to mah bookfriend Leia for lendin me :)) aside from the Japanese theme, i was hooked between the of the wise woman who is also a fox and a good hearted, wandering monk who saves her life. at some point i wasn’t not sure if whatbi was reading was still a dream unexpected intrusions of beauty. like being in a dream in a dream, in a dream... so rich in both story, culture, legends and other mysteries only Gaiman can come up and surprise you with. i feel so privileged to have read this story, thankyou to mah bookfriend Leia for lendin me :)) aside from the Japanese theme, i was hooked between the of the wise woman who is also a fox and a good hearted, wandering monk who saves her life. at some point i wasn’t not sure if whatbi was reading was still a dream or not. I was so absorbed from the very first page- and even the first few lines which said... “I know not whether you came to me or i to you...” And the best is that i finally met the King of Dreams, the Sandman himself and as a lover of stories, i felt so honored and privileged 😌💛 talking animals, demons, spirits, monks and ordinary people this book was so visually and literary rich and whimsical, so just expect the unexpected and be ready to be amazed by every page. this japanese fairy tale was truly beyond my imagination. Again, thankyou Neil Gaiman. a very wise fox woman indeed revenge

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer (DigiWrit)

    Well written and well illustrated, I still couldn't help finding this a pointless read. A fox makes a bet with a badger to trick a monk out of his temple, succumbs to insta-love with him and tries to lay down her life to save him from a rich man's dream curse to steal the monk's life. In the end the monk dies, the fox survives to avenge the monk's untimely death, and the rich man goes mad. It's a sad story that really has no point behind it. Well, other than to show illustrations of bare-breasted Well written and well illustrated, I still couldn't help finding this a pointless read. A fox makes a bet with a badger to trick a monk out of his temple, succumbs to insta-love with him and tries to lay down her life to save him from a rich man's dream curse to steal the monk's life. In the end the monk dies, the fox survives to avenge the monk's untimely death, and the rich man goes mad. It's a sad story that really has no point behind it. Well, other than to show illustrations of bare-breasted women, including a naked hag and a tri-breasted oracle. This could've been a killer novel if it had been better developed and at least been given some semblance of a happy ending.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    It's a bit tough to wrap my head around both Yoshitaka Amano's and P. Craig Russell's The Dream Hunters. They each have their merits. This comic does a nice job of depicting descriptions found in the original, though I prefer Amano's illustrations. The adaptation feels earthier and more grounded in reality while the original has more of a dreamlike quality (ha). I'm already partial to Final Fantasy games so this preference should not surprise. :) It's a bit tough to wrap my head around both Yoshitaka Amano's and P. Craig Russell's The Dream Hunters. They each have their merits. This comic does a nice job of depicting descriptions found in the original, though I prefer Amano's illustrations. The adaptation feels earthier and more grounded in reality while the original has more of a dreamlike quality (ha). I'm already partial to Final Fantasy games so this preference should not surprise. :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This is a beautifully illustrated graphic novel about a gorgeous "Japanese fable" about a fox, a badger and a monk. The graphics are reminiscent of the style of Japanese woodcuts of the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai. In Old Japan creatures of myths and legends walked the Earth and some feature in this story. An excellent bed-time read, sure to spur dreams of your own. I think this will be one of my favourites, if not the favourite of The Sandman stories. This is a beautifully illustrated graphic novel about a gorgeous "Japanese fable" about a fox, a badger and a monk. The graphics are reminiscent of the style of Japanese woodcuts of the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai. In Old Japan creatures of myths and legends walked the Earth and some feature in this story. An excellent bed-time read, sure to spur dreams of your own. I think this will be one of my favourites, if not the favourite of The Sandman stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dinnu Reads Books

    And it is even more approriate to start my reading year with Sandman...as I also finished last year with it :) a very cute and melancholic story :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nadia Zeemeeuw

    The same charming story about a monk and a fox but adapted in classical comics by Gregg Russell. Gorgeous as well, though I liked the first version better.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    I came into this doubtful I would enjoy it as much as the original version with Amano’s breathtaking art, but Russell’s comic adaptation is just as beautiful and affecting.

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