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Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

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Uncovers the often overlooked stories of the women who shaped the black freedom struggle The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, Uncovers the often overlooked stories of the women who shaped the black freedom struggle The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman? From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle. Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fern�ndez, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.


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Uncovers the often overlooked stories of the women who shaped the black freedom struggle The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, Uncovers the often overlooked stories of the women who shaped the black freedom struggle The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman? From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle. Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fern�ndez, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.

30 review for Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Cherry

    Great Primer that Discussed Black Women Liberators This compilation of essays is a great primer for individuals who want to know more about black women freedom fighters. As discussed in this book, black women are largely ignored as leaders in the fight to liberate the oppressed. This book successfully attempts to shine a light of the lives of the women who deserves to be honored like their men counter-parts, but rarely discussed. Each essay included in this informative book details life of a blac Great Primer that Discussed Black Women Liberators This compilation of essays is a great primer for individuals who want to know more about black women freedom fighters. As discussed in this book, black women are largely ignored as leaders in the fight to liberate the oppressed. This book successfully attempts to shine a light of the lives of the women who deserves to be honored like their men counter-parts, but rarely discussed. Each essay included in this informative book details life of a black woman who contributed to fight injustice. As a primer, this book allows the reader to gain a wealth of knowledge without having to scour through different volumes of text.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Leonard

    Pushing back against historic erasure and a tendency to merely mention “various women as key participants and note the damage of sexism” (8) – “dominance through mentioning” – this book documents the political, philosophical, intellectual, organizing and activist contributions of several radical women. Moving beyond a discourse of “firsts” (249), it spotlights visionary women who challenged movements to “imagine a different kind of politics,” to create alternative paths to freedom, and to expand Pushing back against historic erasure and a tendency to merely mention “various women as key participants and note the damage of sexism” (8) – “dominance through mentioning” – this book documents the political, philosophical, intellectual, organizing and activist contributions of several radical women. Moving beyond a discourse of “firsts” (249), it spotlights visionary women who challenged movements to “imagine a different kind of politics,” to create alternative paths to freedom, and to expand the struggle. Along with its efforts to chronicle the contributions of “radical women in the Black Freedom Struggle,” to highlight their impact as leaders, organizers, theorists, strategists, intellectual forces, and in a myriad of other ways, the collection pushes the conversation regarding social movements in a broader sense. Writing against “single-game” analysis and those that focus on individual movements/leaders or the rise and fall of organizations/ movements, the collection speaks to continuity between movements. From Vicki Garvin to Shirley Graham Du Bois, from Rosa Parks to Flo Kennedy, the history of radical women of color is a story that transcends boundaries. Whether talking about Garvin’s “journey from old left to black liberation and Third Word solidarity” or Shirley Chisholm’s presence in multiple types of movements, or Flo Kennedy, Ella Baker, Yuri Kochiyama, and Rosa Parks’ presence and influence across various organizations, this collection “resists marking these women as activists defined exclusively within any singular movement,” making “visible the ways these black women radicals redefined movement politics” (4-5). The breadth of many decades of activism and organizing, intellectual and creative works, is illustrative of the range of influences. To talk about radical women is to talk multiple points of influence, multiple organizations, and multiple movements. The book’s cover, which shows Rosa Parks holding a picture of Malcolm X speaks to the orientation of the book: a refusal to see the contributions and influences of radical women within the Black Freedom Struggle in a single snapshot. The history is too dynamic. The influences extend beyond a struggle against a single injustice but instead are seen in the intellectual and theoretical impact and the confluence and bridges that existed between communities, organizations and movements. To read the rest of this review, please go to - http://drdavidjleonard.com/2014/01/27...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lashonda Slaughter Wilson

    Very interesting perspective, there are some essays that really stand out, especially because of the level of activism prior to the 1960s.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mario

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Washington

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Bouquet

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bavid

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tress

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Rothmund

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lea Kientz

  12. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  13. 4 out of 5

    C. Quabela

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kenja

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    323.1196 W251 2009

  16. 5 out of 5

    Griselda Solis

  17. 4 out of 5

    TB

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chante Roberts

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ramia E Hunter

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle McGuire

  21. 5 out of 5

    Reclaimthefields

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Garcia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris MacDonald-Dennis

  25. 4 out of 5

    starr

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adarju

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  28. 5 out of 5

    S.byndom

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shila

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