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Essays and Poems by Ralph Waldo Emerson (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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"Essays and Poems," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"" "series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics" New introductions commissioned from "Essays and Poems," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"" "series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics" New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. "Barnes & Noble Classics "pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. As an adolescent America searched for its unique identity among the nations of the world, a number of thinkers and writers emerged eager to share their vision of what the American character could be. Among their leaders was Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose essays, lectures, and poems defined the American transcendentalist movement, though he himself disliked the term.Emerson advocates a rejection of fear-driven conformity, a total independence of thought and spirit, and a life lived in harmony with nature. He believes that Truth lies within each individual, for each is part of a greater whole, a universal "over-soul" through which we transcend the merely mortal. Emerson was extremely prolific throughout his life; his collected writings fill forty volumes. This edition contains his major works, including Nature, the essays "Self-Reliance," "The American Scholar," "The Over-Soul," "Circles," "The Poet," and "Experience, " and such important poems as "The Rhodora," "Uriel," "The Humble-Bee," "Earth-Song," "Give All to Love," and the well-loved "Concord Hymn."Includes a comprehensive glossary of names. Peter Norberg has been Assistant Professor of English at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia since 1997. A specialist in New England transcendentalism and the history of the antebellum period, he also has published on Herman Melville's poetry. He currently is writing a history of Emerson's career as a public lecturer.


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"Essays and Poems," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"" "series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics" New introductions commissioned from "Essays and Poems," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"" "series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics" New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. "Barnes & Noble Classics "pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. As an adolescent America searched for its unique identity among the nations of the world, a number of thinkers and writers emerged eager to share their vision of what the American character could be. Among their leaders was Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose essays, lectures, and poems defined the American transcendentalist movement, though he himself disliked the term.Emerson advocates a rejection of fear-driven conformity, a total independence of thought and spirit, and a life lived in harmony with nature. He believes that Truth lies within each individual, for each is part of a greater whole, a universal "over-soul" through which we transcend the merely mortal. Emerson was extremely prolific throughout his life; his collected writings fill forty volumes. This edition contains his major works, including Nature, the essays "Self-Reliance," "The American Scholar," "The Over-Soul," "Circles," "The Poet," and "Experience, " and such important poems as "The Rhodora," "Uriel," "The Humble-Bee," "Earth-Song," "Give All to Love," and the well-loved "Concord Hymn."Includes a comprehensive glossary of names. Peter Norberg has been Assistant Professor of English at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia since 1997. A specialist in New England transcendentalism and the history of the antebellum period, he also has published on Herman Melville's poetry. He currently is writing a history of Emerson's career as a public lecturer.

30 review for Essays and Poems by Ralph Waldo Emerson (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review I had read Emerson’s works once before and I hated it at first reaction always. Well, I decided to read it thoroughly and try to understand it. I was utterly amazed. He had such profound and wonderful things to say. I honestly was deeply touched. I decided to write down everything I got from his piece. It is in very fragmented thoughts, so it may not be in grammatically correct sentences. Well, here goes... Look through our eyes today and not through someone’s from the pa Book Review I had read Emerson’s works once before and I hated it at first reaction always. Well, I decided to read it thoroughly and try to understand it. I was utterly amazed. He had such profound and wonderful things to say. I honestly was deeply touched. I decided to write down everything I got from his piece. It is in very fragmented thoughts, so it may not be in grammatically correct sentences. Well, here goes... Look through our eyes today and not through someone’s from the past. All questions have answers. It is true in nature also. Nature just exists. It is abstract truth. Look at nature as a collective thing - not individual things. Going into nature you become one with it and with yourself. Removed from civilization, you can truly absorb all nature has to offer. Not as a man with biased opinion and view, but like a child free from corrupting suggestions. Free-ness from others opinions - on your own. We are changing, but not by choice. Go with flow and claim independence (from England). We have grown too far apart from one another. Unity has slowly begun to disappear and therefore, men, too individualistic, are no longer complete. We are so defined by what we do - our occupations. This is bad. Scholar means intellect. Be a student and learn. He is too far separated from the other “men.” Life, in nature, as a scholar, is like a circle. No beginning. No end. Order is so complete. Learning is the main focus of scholars and do it through organization and order. We all take things to mean “know thyself, study nature.” Influences on scholar are (1) nature, (2) past - through books, etc., (3) self-action. What you know and take in may not be what you get out of the book. Changes will always occur. Adapt to them. Don’t just accept what you read. Decipher a meaning out of it for yourself. Souls see the truth. You must reach down deep and touch your soul. It won’t and can’t always be easy. Working hard helps you discover your answers. The past literature can always hit your soul and explain your life today to you. The general knowledge we learn and dislike to learn helps us to create ideas and such for us. When you let something pass you by without learning it or catching it, you lose some power. Everything will take off at one time or another. Don’t stop things from growing. Learn from your life experience. Live a little. Become the thinker. Sometimes you can’t change things, you must accept them the way that they are. We will never learn absolutely everything, for there are barriers. Let yourself go and be open. Tell people who you truly are and be open to accept them. As a boy we have the old world classical thoughts. As a youth, romantic ones, and as an adult, we are reflective. Explore the “common.” Today explains the past and the future. The individual is important. World is nothing. Man is all. Get away from Europe. This is what Emerson has to say in a nutshell. I was amazed and inspired by his words. I am looking forward to Thoreau, another man I thought to be not very interesting. Maybe, I will have to start really reading things quickly. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  2. 5 out of 5

    ✨Bean's Books✨

    Okay first of all, the template of the pages of this book is just absolutely divine! It makes the pages look like scrolls of long ago. I wish I could show you pictures! Beautiful bordering and illustrations that I wouldn't necessarily call beautiful themselves but add a certain ambience to the essays and poems written within. This is definitely a must for anyone's library! Okay first of all, the template of the pages of this book is just absolutely divine! It makes the pages look like scrolls of long ago. I wish I could show you pictures! Beautiful bordering and illustrations that I wouldn't necessarily call beautiful themselves but add a certain ambience to the essays and poems written within. This is definitely a must for anyone's library!

  3. 5 out of 5

    travis

    great works are timeless. sometimes the right book finds you at the right time and makes everything ok.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Lyle

    This is astounding. There is a reason why Emerson's words show up on everything from bookmarks to refridgerator magnets. They're pristine and profound. Some of these essays will stay with you long after you read them, as they reach far into your head and heart and demand you to be honest with yourself. The poetry is a little less, but still far reaching. This is astounding. There is a reason why Emerson's words show up on everything from bookmarks to refridgerator magnets. They're pristine and pr This is astounding. There is a reason why Emerson's words show up on everything from bookmarks to refridgerator magnets. They're pristine and profound. Some of these essays will stay with you long after you read them, as they reach far into your head and heart and demand you to be honest with yourself. The poetry is a little less, but still far reaching. This is astounding. There is a reason why Emerson's words show up on everything from bookmarks to refridgerator magnets. They're pristine and profound. Some of these essays will stay with you long after you read them, as they reach far into your head and heart and demand you to be honest with yourself. The poetry is a little less, but still far reaching.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    I first read Emerson in an American Literature course and immediately fell in love. I'm a big fan of nature so the transcendentalist view attracted my attention. Emerson uses very intense vocabulary and sentence structure, but once you spend the time to read things slowly you can decipher so much meaning in his writing. His work is an example of how I hope to write in the future, full of knowledge, experience and eloquence. He gave me an entire new appreciation for nature, making me reconsider e I first read Emerson in an American Literature course and immediately fell in love. I'm a big fan of nature so the transcendentalist view attracted my attention. Emerson uses very intense vocabulary and sentence structure, but once you spend the time to read things slowly you can decipher so much meaning in his writing. His work is an example of how I hope to write in the future, full of knowledge, experience and eloquence. He gave me an entire new appreciation for nature, making me reconsider even some of my religious beliefs. I see things in nature that I would have never noticed before from his writing. He's definitely one of my favorites.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kimber

    Emerson is an American prophet and is the genius behind the Transcendentalist movement. He foresaw the spiritual renaissance, the direction that America was heading in and was ahead of his time in how he saw religion (as opposed to how the masses saw it) as were all the Transcendentalists with him. Unfortunately, his writing suffers from his overwrought style. It just does not hold up and is cumbersome, very difficult to get through. Where his genius really comes through is where it is tightly w Emerson is an American prophet and is the genius behind the Transcendentalist movement. He foresaw the spiritual renaissance, the direction that America was heading in and was ahead of his time in how he saw religion (as opposed to how the masses saw it) as were all the Transcendentalists with him. Unfortunately, his writing suffers from his overwrought style. It just does not hold up and is cumbersome, very difficult to get through. Where his genius really comes through is where it is tightly woven, like in a perfect sentence or group of sentences, where his writing becomes austere and wise. I also love his response to the Abolitionist movement, which is that he thought that it mattered not if society changes, but the individual does not change. And we can still see today these race issues where society was altered before humankind was. "All men plume themselves on the improvement of society, and no man improves."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Dean

    In school I just learned about Ralph Waldo Emerson the poet. They never taught about him as a thinker and philosopher. This book was amazing. The man was an absolute genius. I highly recommend reading this to gain a wider vision of life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    A book I will probably always be reading. It's full of such great wisdom that to say," I'm done," with this work would be a travesty. A book I will probably always be reading. It's full of such great wisdom that to say," I'm done," with this work would be a travesty.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anam Zahra

    Every single word in this BOOK by Ralph is truly magical and touched my soul too. Everyone like me can learn a true meaning of all expressions and feelings in its best way!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janet Diaz

    This is one of those books destined to remain with us for a lifetime. I recommend it to anyone who wants to get to the marrow of life without fear.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hamilton

    Emerson was an early love of mine. I read Emerson every day for at least a half dozen years. Only problem with transcendentalism is that when you annex nature to the soul, it doesn’t necessarily lead to environmentalism. It can lead to a monstrous self that swallows up and subsumes all of nature, “that other me”. Historically the doctrine coincided with manifest destiny, the notion it was the destiny of America to colonize the continent. Parts of the transcendentalist doctrine underwrite this ev Emerson was an early love of mine. I read Emerson every day for at least a half dozen years. Only problem with transcendentalism is that when you annex nature to the soul, it doesn’t necessarily lead to environmentalism. It can lead to a monstrous self that swallows up and subsumes all of nature, “that other me”. Historically the doctrine coincided with manifest destiny, the notion it was the destiny of America to colonize the continent. Parts of the transcendentalist doctrine underwrite this even if Emerson was appalled by colonial violence of “Indian removal”. As soon as you remove nature’s essential difference and subscribe to a full-blown monism, it is not irrational to argue you can do anything with it you want because nature is merely an extension of your gigantic “Soul” . . . That is not Emerson’s only legacy by any means. Thoreau and Muir, the park system, can be traced from his movement . . . and I think Emerson is a unique genius whose incredible writing is not reducible to the spurious doctrine of transcendentalism. His essay “Experience” is especially brilliant and all his other essays are great. Many are just heavily infused with the strong intoxicant of bad metaphysics . . . Perhaps he needed this to find his ecstatic and affirmative voice . . . but with Emerson you have to take the sublime with the hyperbolic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brock

    Though he would refute imitation, Emerson often sounds Socratic in his writing about philosophy, though that comparison only stands in tone not content. What you have here is a collection of “translations” of what you already know down inside about your own potential for originality, but adding to the deep history and wellspring of texts for creatives to pull on Emerson articulates it in a way that is definitely his own. Foundational as an approach to naturalism and ever inspiring, a few of my f Though he would refute imitation, Emerson often sounds Socratic in his writing about philosophy, though that comparison only stands in tone not content. What you have here is a collection of “translations” of what you already know down inside about your own potential for originality, but adding to the deep history and wellspring of texts for creatives to pull on Emerson articulates it in a way that is definitely his own. Foundational as an approach to naturalism and ever inspiring, a few of my favorite essays were: History, Self-Reliance, Compensation, Heroism, Intellect, The Poet, Manners, and Politics. Some of his essays on love and reformers I found cute but not entirely as universal and applicable as I would have expected. The naturalist approach to all art might be challenged today as very cooperate and commercial products have made the high-art/low-art distinction more drastic, but we’ll never know Ralph’s opinion on that.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    If we will take The good we find, asking No questions, we Shall have heaping measures. ------------------------------ To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eyes of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other and a wild delight runs through, despite real sorrows. A year of pa If we will take The good we find, asking No questions, we Shall have heaping measures. ------------------------------ To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eyes of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other and a wild delight runs through, despite real sorrows. A year of pandemic isolation seems like a good year to read the original works of some writers who inspired many of my favorite writers, and as expected, reading Emerson was sublime and subdued at the same time. I turned some of his prose into poetry to make it more intelligible, and some of his essays were perfectly unreadable. Not because of the archaic language but perhaps because what he was saying is now commonplace, part of the fabric of who we are, or who I am, that is seems tedious and too much about politics and individuality, when I am after the experience in nature and the feelings and thoughts that engenders. The poetry was also mediocre so I did do an internet dive and found some more meaningful and powerful stuff; I can’t believe I have never read Threnody, a lament for the death of his young son; it floored me and I cried a small pond. Emerson changed the face of American poetry, inspiring Dickinson and Whitman, and I sense William Stafford, Wendell Berry and Ted Kooser here too; and Jorie Graham, Marie Howe, and even Mary Oliver. I think that we/they have all been transformed by the landscape of America and Emerson led the way. ---------------------------------------------------- Our age is retrospective. It writes Biographies, histories and criticism. The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; We, through their eyes. Why Should We Not Also Enjoy An Original Relation To The Universe? Why should we not have a poetry and philosophy of insight and not of tradition, and a religion by revelation to us, and not the history of theirs? Every mans’ condition is a solution in hieroglyphic to those inquiries. ------------------------------ If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations! The stars awaken a certain reverence, because though always presents, they are inaccessible; but all natural objects make a kindred expression , when the mind is open to their influence. ----------------------------- The eye is the best Of artists. By the Mutual action of Its structure and of the Laws of light, Perspective Is produced, which Integrates Into a landscape. Intense light will make Any landscape Beautiful, And the stimulus It affords to the sense And a sort of Infinitude, Which it hath, like space and time, Make all matter Beauty. -------------------------- Nature satisfies by its loveliness, I see the spectacle of morning From the hilltop, from daybreak To sunrise, with emotions which An angel might share. The long Slender bones of cloud float Like fishes in the sea of crimson Light. From the earth as a shore, I Look out into that silent sea. I seem to partake its rapid Transformations: the active Enchantment reaches my dust, and I dilate and conspire with the morning wind. How does nature deify us with a few and cheap elements? Give me health and a day, and I Will make the pomp of emperors Ridiculous. The dawn is my Assyria, the sun-set and moon-rise my Paphos, and unimaginable realms of faerie; broad noon shall be my England of the senses and the understanding; the night shall be my Germany of mystic philosophy and dreams. ---------------------------- The reason why the world lacks unity, and lies broken and in heaps, Is, Because man us disunited with himself. He cannot be a naturalist, Until He satisfies all the demands of the spirit. Love is as much its demand, As Perception. Indeed, neither can be perfect without the other. In the Uttermost Meaning of the words, thought is devout, and devotion is thought. Deep Calls unto Deep. -------------------------- The first in time and the first in Importance of the influences Upon the mind is that of nature. Every day, the sun; and after Sunset, night and her stars. Ever the winds blow; ever the Grass grows. Every day, men And women, conversing, Beholding, and beholden. The scholar is he of all men Whom this spectacle most engages. What is nature to me? There is Never a beginning, there is never An end, to the inexplicable Continuity of this web of God, But always circular power Returning into itself. Therein It resembles his own spirits, whose Beginning, whose ending, he Never can find,-so entire, So boundless. ---------------------------- All goes to show that the soul in man is not an organ, but animates and exercises all the organs; Is not a function, like the power of memory, of calculation, of comparison, but uses these As hands and feet; is not a faculty, but a light; is not the intellect of the will, but the master Of the intellect and the will; is the vast background of our being, In which they lie, an immensity not possessed and that cannot be possessed. From within or from behind, a light shines through us upon things, and makes us aware We are nothing, but the light is all. A man is the façade of the temple where in all wisdom and all good abide. ========================================= We cannot write the order of the variable winds. How can We penetrate the law of our shifting moods and Susceptibility? Instead of the firmament Of yesterday, which our eyes require, it is today An eggshell which coops us in; we cannot even see What or where our stars of destiny are. From day to day, The capital facts of human life are hidden from our eyes. Suddenly the mist rolls up, and reveals them, and we think How much good time is gone that might have been saved… A sudden rise in the road shows us the system of mountains, And all the summits, which have been just as near us All the year, but quite out of mind. If life seem a succession Of dreams, yet poetic justice is done in dreams also. _____________________________ The Snow-storm Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Arrives the snow, and, driving o'er the fields, Seems nowhere to alight: the whited air Hides hills and woods, the river, and the heaven, And veils the farm-house at the garden's end. The sled and traveller stopped, the courier's feet Delayed, all friends shut out, the housemates sit Around the radiant fireplace, enclosed In a tumultuous privacy of storm. Come see the north wind's masonry. Out of an unseen quarry evermore Furnished with tile, the fierce artificer Curves his white bastions with projected roof Round every windward stake, or tree, or door. Speeding, the myriad-handed, his wild work So fanciful, so savage, nought cares he For number or proportion. Mockingly, On coop or kennel he hangs Parian wreaths; A swan-like form invests the hidden thorn; Fills up the farmer's lane from wall to wall, Maugre the farmer's sighs; and, at the gate, A tapering turret overtops the work. And when his hours are numbered, and the world Is all his own, retiring, as he were not, Leaves, when the sun appears, astonished Art To mimic in slow structures, stone by stone, Built in an age, the mad wind's night-work, The frolic architecture of the snow. ________________________ On being asked, whence is the flower. In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes, I found the fresh Rhodora in the woods, Spreading its leafless blooms in a damp nook, To please the desert and the sluggish brook. The purple petals fallen in the pool Made the black water with their beauty gay; Here might the red-bird come his plumes to cool, And court the flower that cheapens his array. Rhodora! if the sages ask thee why This charm is wasted on the earth and sky, Tell them, dear, that, if eyes were made for seeing, Then beauty is its own excuse for Being; Why thou wert there, O rival of the rose! I never thought to ask; I never knew; But in my simple ignorance suppose The self-same power that brought me there, brought you. ------------------------------------------ All that's good and great with thee Stands in deep conspiracy. Thou hast bribed the dark and lonely To report thy features only, And the cold and purple morning Itself with thoughts of thee adorning, The leafy dell, the city mart, Equal trophies of thine art, E'en the flowing azure air Thou hast touched for my despair, And if I languish into dreams, Again I meet the ardent beams. Queen of things! I dare not die In Being's deeps past ear and eye, Lest there I find the same deceiver, And be the sport of Fate forever. Dread power, but dear! if God thou be, Unmake me quite, or give thyself to me. ____________________________ For this present, hard Is the fortune of the bard Born out of time; All his accomplishment From nature's utmost treasure spent Booteth not him. When the pine tosses its cones To the song of its waterfall tones, He speeds to the woodland walks, To birds and trees he talks. --- What he knows, nobody wants. In the wood he travels glad Without better fortune had, Melancholy without bad. Planter of celestial plants, What he knows, nobody wants,— What he knows, he hides, not vaunts. Knowledge this man prizes best Seems fantastic to the rest, Pondering shadows, colors, clouds, Grass buds, and caterpillars' shrouds, Boughs on which the wild bees settle, Tints that spot the violet's petal, Why nature loves the number five, And why the star-form she repeats, Lover of all things alive, Wonderer at all he meets, Wonderer chiefly at himself,— Who can tell him what he is, Or how meet in human elf Coming and past eternities? ---- Go where he will, the wise man is at home, His hearth the earth; — his hall the azure dome; Where his clear spirit leads him, there's his road, By God's own light illumined and foreshowed. ------------------------------------------- We cannot learn the cipher That's writ upon our cell, Stars help us by a mystery Which we could never spell. -- Within, without, the idle earth Stars weave eternal rings, The sun himself shines heartily, And shares the joy he brings. -- The seeds of land and sea Are the atoms of his body bright, And his behest obey. --- Spring still makes spring in the mind, When sixty years are told; Love wakes anew this throbbing heart, And we are never old. Over the winter glaciers, I see the summer glow, And through the wild-piled snowdrift The warm rose buds below. ---------------------------------- Give all to love; Obey thy heart; Friends, kindred, days, Estate, good fame, Plans, credit, and the muse; Nothing refuse. 'Tis a brave master, Let it have scope, Follow it utterly, Hope beyond hope; High and more high, It dives into noon, With wing unspent, Untold intent; But 'tis a god, Knows its own path, And the outlets of the sky. 'Tis not for the mean, It requireth courage stout, Souls above doubt, Valor unbending; Such 'twill reward, They shall return More than they were, And ever ascending. _____________________ Threnody (Lament) The south-wind brings Life, sunshine, and desire, And on every mount and meadow Breathes aromatic fire, But over the dead he has no power, The lost, the lost he cannot restore, And, looking over the hills, I mourn The darling who shall not return. --- Wilt thou freeze love's tidal flow, Whose streams through nature circling go? Nail the star struggling to its track On the half-climbed Zodiack? Light is light which radiates, Blood is blood which circulates, Life is life which generates, And many-seeming life is one,— Wilt thou transfix and make it none, Its onward stream too starkly pent In figure, bone, and lineament? --- Some went and came about the dead, And some in books of solace read, Some to their friends the tidings say, Some went to write, some went to pray, One tarried here, there hurried one, But their heart abode with none.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lesliemae

    From Self-Reliance: "There is one mind common among all men." "I would write on the lintels of my doorpost: Whim." "No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature" -------------- May 2009 inscription: I fell for **** this month and have constructed an entire imaginary future - is this wrong to entertain? Frustrating, yes, but wrong? I look at @@@ and know I really do like being with him, but want **** too. August 2009 inscription: **** and I went on a scooter trip on Friday to start the perfect long From Self-Reliance: "There is one mind common among all men." "I would write on the lintels of my doorpost: Whim." "No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature" -------------- May 2009 inscription: I fell for **** this month and have constructed an entire imaginary future - is this wrong to entertain? Frustrating, yes, but wrong? I look at @@@ and know I really do like being with him, but want **** too. August 2009 inscription: **** and I went on a scooter trip on Friday to start the perfect long weekend with a perfect day. It was sunny, a first for the past month of July was only briefly punctuated with sun amidst a Dostoevsky-like text of rain. We went out to Limehouse, Ontario - climbed a tree and laid in a field of clover. I read him Jeanette Winterson while he laid on his back and smoked Djarum cigarettes. We laid in the field with the sun beating down on us until we were well roasted and decided to leave for a nearby quarry/pond to cool off. Floating on our backs in the pond we watched the clouds or swam among the ripples of light the sun made with each subtle movement spreading in wide arches around us. He was swimming around with his white bum popping above the dark surface here and there, and I felt all "one love" with the trees, the water, and the mossy beards that randomly floated up from the bottom and puffed out into thousands of brown dandelion parachutes as they brushed against you. I felt naturally and creatively part of the scene and with ****. As we laid in the tall grass drying off, the ants bit our feet. I could have rolled over and been directly in his arms and felt totally right there. Instead I read him pieces of Brautigan's Trout Fishing in America as I rubbed a wheat weed across his legs to dissuade the ants. Riding home I felt my hand on his chest just below his heart - holding him lightly as we sped through the fields down empty country roads. I didn't want to leave the moment. A moment where the side of the road vanishes into grass, then into field, where the scooter sways with the wind and the winding road - his body and mine are one with every gentle movement. I didn't want to think past the moment or about a time when my hand would not rest on his chest just below his heart. "To believe your own thought, to believe what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, that is genius." (Self-Reliance)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Great excerpts from his speeches on the evolution of man's skill, the inspiration and limitation of books, the importance of direct experience, how memories evolve with time, trusting our instincts and being ourselves. "To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, - that is genius." "Insist on yourself; never imitate. Your own gift you can present every moment with the cumulative force of a whole life's cultivation; but of the adopted Great excerpts from his speeches on the evolution of man's skill, the inspiration and limitation of books, the importance of direct experience, how memories evolve with time, trusting our instincts and being ourselves. "To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, - that is genius." "Insist on yourself; never imitate. Your own gift you can present every moment with the cumulative force of a whole life's cultivation; but of the adopted talent of another, you have only an extemporaneous, half possession." "Always do what you are afraid to do."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian Barnett

    "I feel that nothing can befall me in life--no disgrace, no calamity (leaving me my eyes) which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground--my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite spaces--all mean egoitism vanishes." However, "To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and heart of the child. The lover of nature is "I feel that nothing can befall me in life--no disgrace, no calamity (leaving me my eyes) which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground--my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite spaces--all mean egoitism vanishes." However, "To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy." ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen Hanson

    While these essays definitely take a bit of effort to read, they are well worth it. I read this on and off over a period of a year or so. I appreciated that it was easy to pick up, read an essay, and then come back to it later when I had the time. There were so many wonderful bits of knowledge and deep insights included in this book. I found myself constantly underlining things I read and thinking about the ideas throughout the day. Emerson is one of the few 'classic' writers that deserves the l While these essays definitely take a bit of effort to read, they are well worth it. I read this on and off over a period of a year or so. I appreciated that it was easy to pick up, read an essay, and then come back to it later when I had the time. There were so many wonderful bits of knowledge and deep insights included in this book. I found myself constantly underlining things I read and thinking about the ideas throughout the day. Emerson is one of the few 'classic' writers that deserves the label. A great collection of essays that can be revisted over and over.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    If RW were alive today, he'd be a bestselling self-help guru. This book is fantastic. There are some lesser known essays in this book that are excellent. One such essay is called "Illusions." Self-reliance is a classic essay as is Nature. Power is very interesting as well. I'm not much for Ralph's poetry but he sure could write an amazing essay! If RW were alive today, he'd be a bestselling self-help guru. This book is fantastic. There are some lesser known essays in this book that are excellent. One such essay is called "Illusions." Self-reliance is a classic essay as is Nature. Power is very interesting as well. I'm not much for Ralph's poetry but he sure could write an amazing essay!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaylee

    In all honestly, reading this was such a chore for me. I gave it 4 stars because I felt bad that I didn’t dedicate all of myself into reading and appreciating this work. Excellent writing and philosophy, but it went way over my understanding. I wish I had the patience or intelligence to be able to decipher this better!

  20. 5 out of 5

    John Reynolds

    Timeless, thoughtful, engaging, a great read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    From the blur of college classes, I remember this lovely prose.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aldrich Johnson

    A good read. Essays and Poems is a must read for all literature student A good read. Essays and Poems is a must read for all literature student

  23. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Wallace

    This should be required reading for everyone.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    I don't agree with everything he says, but what he does say, HE SAYS IT SO WELL. I don't agree with everything he says, but what he does say, HE SAYS IT SO WELL.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Domagoj Bodlaj

    I wish my vocabulary were richer so I could enjoy and appreciate this wise man even more than I do now

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I skipped around a lot, but I enjoyed reading his poems and his essays.

  27. 5 out of 5

    S

    This collection is soothing to the soul and fulfilling for the mind. Emerson’s writings are deeply humanist and his transcendentalist philosophy acts as the catalyst for his observations about nature and the environment.In my opinion, RWE is deeply underrated. I find comfort in his words and he has provided so much hope for me in these difficult times. In self-reliance, he discusses in detail the innate goodness and ability for growth that humans possess and his sentiments are time withstanding This collection is soothing to the soul and fulfilling for the mind. Emerson’s writings are deeply humanist and his transcendentalist philosophy acts as the catalyst for his observations about nature and the environment.In my opinion, RWE is deeply underrated. I find comfort in his words and he has provided so much hope for me in these difficult times. In self-reliance, he discusses in detail the innate goodness and ability for growth that humans possess and his sentiments are time withstanding and applicable for most everyone’s lives. I recommend this collection to anyone looking to grow emotionally, philosophically, spiritually, etc. But it’s also great for looking to avoid an existential crisis or needed to disengage with the high tensions of today. Either way, these pieces are thought-provoking and life-affirming. As an aside, Emerson was a religious man and this is reflected in his works. That being said, religious and non-religious people of all faiths will likely be able to derive meaning and find value in Emerson’s work because it is human-centric and exists along most common ideas of morality. I particularly enjoy The American Scholar, Nature, Friendship, and Self-Reliance, but everything in here is worthy of a read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Juan Jacobo Bernal

    This comment is related to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Essays, Stratford Edition published in 1892. I found this collection somewhat disorganized. Some essays (e.g. Nature) display Emerson’s characteristic eloquence and inspiration, however this tome contains other ones (e.g. Nominalist and Realist) which I found simply dull. All in all, I found some stirring gems in here and that is what I love about Waldo Emerson.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    There were some timeless moments in some of the essays, and a lot more anticapitalism than I expected, but overall I did not particularly enjoy this collection. I do recommend the address to Harvard's Divinity School for those interested in spirituality, and "An Address to the Citizens of Concord" was surprisingly relevant to the current political moment. Also, There are only about 40 pages of poetry and 400 pages of essays, which feels misleading to me. There were some timeless moments in some of the essays, and a lot more anticapitalism than I expected, but overall I did not particularly enjoy this collection. I do recommend the address to Harvard's Divinity School for those interested in spirituality, and "An Address to the Citizens of Concord" was surprisingly relevant to the current political moment. Also, There are only about 40 pages of poetry and 400 pages of essays, which feels misleading to me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Loea

    Sometimes very insightful, sometimes virtually incomprehensible. Preferred essay writing (such as "The American Scholar" and "Circles") over the impenetrable poetry. Reading this in a classroom setting made it much easier to understand. Sometimes very insightful, sometimes virtually incomprehensible. Preferred essay writing (such as "The American Scholar" and "Circles") over the impenetrable poetry. Reading this in a classroom setting made it much easier to understand.

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