Hot Best Seller

Us by Mrs. Molesworth, Fiction, Historical

Availability: Ready to download

This morning, though, Nurse has fallen ill -- and somehow the children manage to break one of their treasured bowls. Then when strangers appear on the lane, while the adults are away, Duke and Pamela's troubles grow greater than their young minds can embrace! Mary Louisa Molesworth (1836-1921) was the author of such beloved children's novels as The Cuckoo Clock and The Tape This morning, though, Nurse has fallen ill -- and somehow the children manage to break one of their treasured bowls. Then when strangers appear on the lane, while the adults are away, Duke and Pamela's troubles grow greater than their young minds can embrace! Mary Louisa Molesworth (1836-1921) was the author of such beloved children's novels as The Cuckoo Clock and The Tapestry Room.


Compare

This morning, though, Nurse has fallen ill -- and somehow the children manage to break one of their treasured bowls. Then when strangers appear on the lane, while the adults are away, Duke and Pamela's troubles grow greater than their young minds can embrace! Mary Louisa Molesworth (1836-1921) was the author of such beloved children's novels as The Cuckoo Clock and The Tape This morning, though, Nurse has fallen ill -- and somehow the children manage to break one of their treasured bowls. Then when strangers appear on the lane, while the adults are away, Duke and Pamela's troubles grow greater than their young minds can embrace! Mary Louisa Molesworth (1836-1921) was the author of such beloved children's novels as The Cuckoo Clock and The Tapestry Room.

17 review for Us by Mrs. Molesworth, Fiction, Historical

  1. 5 out of 5

    Daisy May Johnson

    First published in 1885, 'Us' is a fairly typical piece of children's literature for this age. The good are good, the bad are bad, and the upper classes are full of moral upstanding-ness and the lower classes (particularly gypsies) are the worst. They are prejudices of the time, and though I don't excuse them in the slightest, it's important to recognise that they exists and that they colour this book quite substantially. Having said that however, it's also important to recognise that this is a First published in 1885, 'Us' is a fairly typical piece of children's literature for this age. The good are good, the bad are bad, and the upper classes are full of moral upstanding-ness and the lower classes (particularly gypsies) are the worst. They are prejudices of the time, and though I don't excuse them in the slightest, it's important to recognise that they exists and that they colour this book quite substantially. Having said that however, it's also important to recognise that this is a ferociously well-written book. Honestly, I was surprised by how post-modern it felt at points; Mrs Molesworth engages in asides to the reader, ruminations upon the motives of the characters, and genuinely tells this story in such a fresh and dynamic manner, that it doesn't feel like an 1885 kind of story at all. The children, however, are tools. Forgive me, but I can't describe them in any other manner. Everybody is besotted with their angelic ways and their fair appearance, but then the kids accidentally break a bowl, don't confess, decide to buy a new one from the gypsies, and then get stolen by said gypsies, and really there's nobody to blame but their own idiocy at this point. Of course there's some social commentary at play here and some pointed moralising about how it's best to confess to your sins otherwise you might be stolen by gypsies and sold to a circus man, but that's all par for the course for the books of this era. They work to maintain the status quo, whether it's right or wrong. (I was particularly amused, for example, that the Noble Gypsy Boy Who Helps Out The Tool Children gets the happy reward of being their servant). Baby speech aside (forgive me, but if you write about "mouses" and "teef", that will always make you lose brownie points with me), not everybody does this as well as Mrs Molesworth. Us was a real surprise and a solid, solid read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Similar in style to most early 1900s children's literature with two angelic children who meet misfortune with stoicism and "godliness" thereby converting the lesser evils and triumphing over the main evil (in this story that takes the form of a gypsy. Lots of stereotypes of the Rom, but at least two of them help the children escape their kidnapping and become "honest citizens." Similar in style to most early 1900s children's literature with two angelic children who meet misfortune with stoicism and "godliness" thereby converting the lesser evils and triumphing over the main evil (in this story that takes the form of a gypsy. Lots of stereotypes of the Rom, but at least two of them help the children escape their kidnapping and become "honest citizens."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Child Of God

  4. 5 out of 5

    Annice

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Fodor

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christiana

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lee

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Barron

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam Finegold

  10. 4 out of 5

    Igraine

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annice

  12. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Wilinski

  13. 4 out of 5

    Malak

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gazmend Kryeziu

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Sandberg

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Hammel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...