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Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children's Picture Books

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A pioneering study of a unique narrative form, Words about Pictures examines the special qualities of picture books--books intended to educate or tell stories to young children. Drawing from a number of aesthetic and literary sources, Perry Nodelman explores the ways in which the interplay of the verbal and visual aspects of picture books conveys more narrative information A pioneering study of a unique narrative form, Words about Pictures examines the special qualities of picture books--books intended to educate or tell stories to young children. Drawing from a number of aesthetic and literary sources, Perry Nodelman explores the ways in which the interplay of the verbal and visual aspects of picture books conveys more narrative information and stimulation than either medium could achieve alone. Moving from "baby" books, alphabet books, and word books to such well-known children's picture books as Nancy Ekholm Burkert's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Gerald McDermott's Arrow to the Sun, Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are, and Chris Van Allsburg's The Garden of Abdul Gasazi, Nodelman reveals how picture-book narrative is affected by the exclusively visual information of picture-book design and illustration as well as by the relationships between pictures and their complementary texts.


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A pioneering study of a unique narrative form, Words about Pictures examines the special qualities of picture books--books intended to educate or tell stories to young children. Drawing from a number of aesthetic and literary sources, Perry Nodelman explores the ways in which the interplay of the verbal and visual aspects of picture books conveys more narrative information A pioneering study of a unique narrative form, Words about Pictures examines the special qualities of picture books--books intended to educate or tell stories to young children. Drawing from a number of aesthetic and literary sources, Perry Nodelman explores the ways in which the interplay of the verbal and visual aspects of picture books conveys more narrative information and stimulation than either medium could achieve alone. Moving from "baby" books, alphabet books, and word books to such well-known children's picture books as Nancy Ekholm Burkert's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Gerald McDermott's Arrow to the Sun, Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are, and Chris Van Allsburg's The Garden of Abdul Gasazi, Nodelman reveals how picture-book narrative is affected by the exclusively visual information of picture-book design and illustration as well as by the relationships between pictures and their complementary texts.

30 review for Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children's Picture Books

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarz

    Useful for MA Children's Lit Useful for MA Children's Lit

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Fascinating discussion of how pictures work, using many familiar titles but especially WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. I was particularly struck by the chapter on the rhythms of picture book narrative, the back-and-forth movement between words and pictures. It made me wonder about the different ways we might now read informational books, so much more extensively illustrated than they were even in 1988 when he wrote this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    "Good picture books, then, offer us what all good art offers us: greater consciousness--the opportunity, in other words, to be more human. That means to be less innocent, more wise. It also means both to feel more objectively and to think with more involvement...allows us first to know the world and then to love the world we know." "Good picture books, then, offer us what all good art offers us: greater consciousness--the opportunity, in other words, to be more human. That means to be less innocent, more wise. It also means both to feel more objectively and to think with more involvement...allows us first to know the world and then to love the world we know."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susanna

    I think that this book had good points throughout. But I hated this book. The author was very repetitive and took 20 pages each time to get the point across. Also, the title, Words About Pictures, is just that. There are very few images in this book to depict what the author is trying to say.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cara Byrne

    Like everything else Nodelman has written, I found _Words about Pictures_ to be really interesting, very readable, and just fun to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    "In a single day, how many non-signifying fields do we cross?" "In a single day, how many non-signifying fields do we cross?"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sasha

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Imprescindible

  9. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Lang

  10. 5 out of 5

    Reham Almutairi رهام المطيري

  11. 5 out of 5

    E.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica DeYoung Kander

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Jean Lareau

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ka

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah McLean

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karen Craven

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

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