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Allen Verbatim: Lectures on Poetry, Politics, Consciousness

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30 review for Allen Verbatim: Lectures on Poetry, Politics, Consciousness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul Klinger

    Moved by the lectures with Duncan given at Kent State during the 70's. In particular, "Advice to Youth." A moment when Ginsberg and Duncan realize they both wrote their first important poems around 28 or 29 years of age; it took them ten years of reading to get there. I'm glad Duncan chooses "The Venice Poem" as that moment. Really excited by his idea of "massive access." Massive access is what the ten years is for. So you have access when the thing finally comes. Duncan moves into this idea of Moved by the lectures with Duncan given at Kent State during the 70's. In particular, "Advice to Youth." A moment when Ginsberg and Duncan realize they both wrote their first important poems around 28 or 29 years of age; it took them ten years of reading to get there. I'm glad Duncan chooses "The Venice Poem" as that moment. Really excited by his idea of "massive access." Massive access is what the ten years is for. So you have access when the thing finally comes. Duncan moves into this idea of models: "And so you think and write day and night like what you admire. Yes, almost any model. This is the role of models, and sometimes you will find they crumble beneath you; they don't suit your spirit, you were wrong. There are many people who take a model in poetry and when the model in poetry doesn't unfold something in themselves never, never look for another one at all. And what poets do, endlessly, actually, is come into a huge love match with masses of poets." Ginsberg talks about Dylan and his relationship to Woody Guthrie, which makes me think of the "I'm Not There" movie and how all of those Dylan models succeed/fail in their different ways. Richard Gere being the biggest failure in my reading, trying for the older, the reclusive, what should be the most accessible. But there is something very charismatic about Duncan's approach to loving and modeling; he talks about "entering" other poets ("you try to enter its spirit...you don't study in a classroom with him...it's entirely voluntary"). Big thanks to Tenney Nathanson for imparting this idea years ago in the way he teaches a workshop. Trying to make up for the workshop even before it happens. The last thing I think about is Ronald Johnson introducing his approach to "Radi Os." I'm totally on board with Blake being his master, but somewhere in Radi Os he claims to have undertaken the writing as Blake, that is, entering into Blake's spirit to revise Paradise Lost. I don't see this happening. I have reread more than once looking to this. I feel by that point no entering was necessary. He got Blake going with the "Book of the Green Man." Then onto something else. I mean it sounds great to enact Blake's criticism of Milton in this way, but the book does not read as the realization of this end. I wish I could see Allen Ginsberg and Robert Duncan doing some kind of angelic yoga together. That's eternal dream time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Ginsberg giving insightful lectures on a college tour. For people who love insight but hate rambling beatnik poetry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Júlia Trličová

    This is perfect for anyone who wants a little insight into Ginsberg but does not want to read a biography or understand beatnik poetry!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ann M

  5. 5 out of 5

    Richard

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    Bob

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    M

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Wager

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    Mary

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    Marsha

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Maayan

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    Henry

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    Rusty

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Slater

  15. 4 out of 5

    D. M. Shepherd

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maarja Oitsalu

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ron Pendragon

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    Colin

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    Scott McKay

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    Elissa

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    Philip Gayle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fleckenstein

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  25. 5 out of 5

    Breezy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Bishop

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Webb

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Gallagher

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