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Fun Inc.: Why games are the 21st Century's most serious business

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People make many assumptions about video games; only teenage boys play them, they increase anti-social behaviour and they tend to be violent. Fun Inc. dispels these misconceptions, revealing that 40 per cent of all video game players are women, that most of the bestselling console games of all time involve no real-world violence at all, and how World of Warcraft's online c People make many assumptions about video games; only teenage boys play them, they increase anti-social behaviour and they tend to be violent. Fun Inc. dispels these misconceptions, revealing that 40 per cent of all video game players are women, that most of the bestselling console games of all time involve no real-world violence at all, and how World of Warcraft's online community of over 12 million players is changing our understanding of what it means to be sociable in the modern world. But understanding games means a lot more than simply challenging stereotypes. Find out why the South Korean government will invest $200 billion into its video games industry over the next 4 years and how games are used to train the US Military, to model global pandemics and to campaign against human rights abuses in Africa. Game worlds are creating a new science of mass engagement that is starting to transform our understanding of economics, business and communications. Whether you like video games or loathe them, Fun Inc. will show you that you cannot ignore them.


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People make many assumptions about video games; only teenage boys play them, they increase anti-social behaviour and they tend to be violent. Fun Inc. dispels these misconceptions, revealing that 40 per cent of all video game players are women, that most of the bestselling console games of all time involve no real-world violence at all, and how World of Warcraft's online c People make many assumptions about video games; only teenage boys play them, they increase anti-social behaviour and they tend to be violent. Fun Inc. dispels these misconceptions, revealing that 40 per cent of all video game players are women, that most of the bestselling console games of all time involve no real-world violence at all, and how World of Warcraft's online community of over 12 million players is changing our understanding of what it means to be sociable in the modern world. But understanding games means a lot more than simply challenging stereotypes. Find out why the South Korean government will invest $200 billion into its video games industry over the next 4 years and how games are used to train the US Military, to model global pandemics and to campaign against human rights abuses in Africa. Game worlds are creating a new science of mass engagement that is starting to transform our understanding of economics, business and communications. Whether you like video games or loathe them, Fun Inc. will show you that you cannot ignore them.

30 review for Fun Inc.: Why games are the 21st Century's most serious business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    Fun Inc doesn’t really explain its subtitle (in the edition I read), “Why Gaming Will Dominate the Twenty-First Century.” At least, it doesn’t demonstrate “domination” in terms of dwarfing or controlling the vast percentage of the economy. A later edition calls it the century's "most serious business." That's a nice play on words, but is it true? Does author Tom Chatfield demonstrate the importance of games as a vital part of human experience? I believe so. Does he manage to show that the indust Fun Inc doesn’t really explain its subtitle (in the edition I read), “Why Gaming Will Dominate the Twenty-First Century.” At least, it doesn’t demonstrate “domination” in terms of dwarfing or controlling the vast percentage of the economy. A later edition calls it the century's "most serious business." That's a nice play on words, but is it true? Does author Tom Chatfield demonstrate the importance of games as a vital part of human experience? I believe so. Does he manage to show that the industry has the potential for growth and is far beyond the early categorization as a fad? Again, I believe so. Yet, “domination” means more than being vibrant and viable. Chatfield begins with a solid description of what it means to have “a game” and “to play a game.” Chatfield makes an interesting point with Pictionary. “What we have in summary is a complex and powerful set of human motivators: achievement, competition, collaboration, learning and improvement, communication and self-expression. And what makes them a ‘game’, as opposed to something more serious, is the avowedly non-functional context they are framed in—the box, the label, the time set aside for pleasure rather than labour.” (p. 4) The box, the rules, the allocated time all identify the results as separate from “real” life, but allow players to explore all sorts of functional abilities and ideas in that “unreal” world. No one gets a “real” job by claiming to be great at Pictionary, Scrabble, or even World of Warcraft, but the ability to think, troubleshoot problems, and express ideas and solutions that one uses in these games can definitely enhance one’s performance at work. But Chatfield goes on to rightly contend that games are about “fun.” As the former editor-in-chief of Computer Gaming World who was accused of being “…the guy who keeps the ‘fun’ out of Computer Gaming World” because I didn’t allow authors to say that anything was “fun” unless they explained “why” they thought it was fun, I was curious where this book would go with the idea of fun. Chatfield quoted former Ultima Online and Star Wars Galaxies designer Raph Koster as stating that “It’s the word we are stuck with. …There isn’t even consensus across the European languages as to what exactly to call this vague, general feeling that in English is called ‘fun.’” (p. 8) Chatfield falls back on the analogy that, like humour (it is, after all, a British book), one knows it when one hears it/sees it. Yet, he goes on to make a very important claim about fun in games. It isn’t the obvious things (what we in the design business call “chrome”) like graphics, pace, and subject matter that make games entertaining. Chatfield contends, “…even in the most stunning-looking ultra-violent game imaginable, there will rapidly come a point at which players realize that what makes the experience of playing meaningful is something more than symbolic than literal.” (pp. 9-10) Later in the book, he quotes California professor Edward Castronova, “I know people are suspicious of words like ‘fun’. But I think you’re not getting the whole person if you’re not compelling them.” (p. 170) He also quotes Suzanne Seggerman, founder of Games for Change, “…’fun’ is an inadequate description of what games do in the first place. … I don’t think a game has to be ‘fun’. It has to be engaging, it has to be well-designed; what makes a game good is the balance of challenge and reward, and that is about learning.” (p. 181) And, of course, I’m in the business in the first place because I agree with her assessment that “I don’t look on games as competing with the real world and human interactions. I see them as a medium and as a path towards actions in the real world.” (p. 187) Of course, that sword cuts both directions. In terms of why we play, I liked it when he said, “While a game may be said to act like a drug in the compelling pleasure it gives, the behavioural mechanics of gaining pleasure from games are the very opposite of the passive process of ingesting a substance and waiting for it to act. It is action, coupled with challenges, incentives and constant feedback, that makes gaming what it is.” (p. 72) I found plenty to contemplate about the potential negatives of gaming in Susan Greenfield’s research suggesting that “…excessive dopamine production induced by onscreen stimulation may in the long term reduce the activation of an area of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex, in the process making people less empathetic, more self-centred, and generally more addictive and immature as personalities.” (pp. 72-3) Of course, this has to be balanced with another report that observes, “…it is certainly possible that pathological gaming causes poorer school performance, etc., but it is equally likely that children who have trouble in school seek to play games to experience feelings of mastery, and that attention problems cause both poorer school performance and an attraction to games.” (p. 79) In beginning to talk about the economics of game publishing, the book cites Grand Theft Auto IV as having a development budget of over $100 million, using a production team of over 550 members (not counting voice talent and motion-capture performers). At a $60 price point, the game grossed $500 million in its first week of sales ($310 million on the first day compared to the Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows book launch at $220 million in first 24 hours and the Spider-Man 3 first day grow at $60 million. (p. 29) These are heady numbers and are convincing enough that if the subtitle of the book how been, “Why Gaming Will Dominate the 21st Century Entertainment Market?” I wouldn’t have a quibble. Of course, Chatfield isn’t a pure cheerleader for the industry. He delivers bad news, too. He cites the CEO of a UK development studio (in 2008) as stating that while games sales were increasing by approximately 15% per year, development costs were increasing by 25% per year (p. 31). Such escalation is certainly unsustainable, but one should remember the classic triangle often applied to electronic games (budget, scope, time). Move any point on the triangle and it affects the other two. Hence, if one could reduce the budgets… Of course, Chatfield points toward this in the latter portion of the book when he states that the cost of entry (ie budgets) for today’s (2008’s) internet-based games and the cost of failure is potentially less devastating (p. 216). Now, shifting the “budget” point isn’t necessarily a panacea for existing companies in the electronic entertainment space, Chatfield recognizes, “…it is increasingly likely that global competition will bring into play an almost Darwinian principle, with local companies likely to fall under the weight of increased foreign competition.” (p. 222) I was intrigued by the book’s citations from Nicole Lazzaro, CEO of XEO Design, who cites four keys to releasing emotions in gameplay: 1) “hard fun” where one overcomes obstacles; 2) “easy fun” where one enjoys the pure joy of experiencing the game (p. 50); 3) “altered states” where the way one feels about things may be changed by playing the game (pp. 50-1); and 4) the “people factor” where one savors the joy of merely participating with others both inside and outside the game (p. 51). This consultant to companies like Electronic Arts also notes that game play adds new behavior, rituals, and emotions to a player’s life experience (p. 51). From there, Chatfield offers a fabulous description of the experience of gaming which truly resonated with me. “To enter into the world of a game is to visit somewhere unfallen and ageless, where what you do and experience seems to occupy a special, separate kind of temporality; and where the passage of time in your own life leaves no mark.” (p. 52) Fun Inc. does a reasonably good job of demonstrating how every new medium (throughout history from moving from oral communication to written communication, literature to comics, stage to film, etc.) has been criticized for encouraging various kinds of intellectual laziness (p. 56). As a result of the immediacy of the electronic game experience, the medium “…has provided both the ideal breeding ground for moral panic and for the widening of the divide between those who play and those who don’t.” (p. 59) Anecdotal evidence like the “dragon sabre” story regarding Legend of Mir 3 where a player loaned a virtual sword to another player, only to discover that the latter auctioned it off on eBay. When the former discovered that there was no legal recourse with regard to the virtual property, he took matters into his own hands, confronted the other player, and stabbed him to death (pp. 60-61). Such stories add fuel to the fire, as did the infamous Kretschner shooting (p. 68) where Chatfield shows multiple errors in The Sunday Times coverage. Most importantly, he cites a United States Secret Service study of incidents from 1974-2000 which showed that only 59% of those perpetrators were even interested in violent media of ANY kind (not just games) and only 10% were even interested in video games at all (pp. 68-69). Speaking of the idea of selling virtual property, Chatfield quotes one player as indicating that he couldn’t sell his World of Warcraft character because everything he had every accomplished or gained was the work of a group of people. Even though the player was resigning from the game (real life intervened), he felt it would be a slap in the face to the other virtual characters who had worked so hard to make his virtual character who he was (pp. 96-7). Of course, the real power in this book is when the author shifts from talking about current behavior in the sense of “gold mining” in MMORPGs (where someone in a wealthy country pays real currency to purchase virtual currency or property that people in poorer countries may have performed repetitive tasks to earn (at under $1 per hour)) to the idea of “intelligent shared spaces” (p. 160) where “real” space is transformed through virtual space because of a computer model that monitors usage (p. 161). “Literally, everything in a game is measurable: every action, every interaction, every message, every item, every rule. The entire structure of a game is composed of raw, recordable data. Imagine, then, the kind of information that can be gathered by letting loose thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of human players within a carefully constructed virtual space.” (p. 166) Does Chatfield convincingly present a case for video games dominating the 21st century? Not really! However, from the guy who predicted (back in the ‘90s) that massively multiplayer online gaming would become the dominant entertainment medium by the current point of time to the very talented author/researcher of this book, I agree that video games will dominate the entertainment market and discretionary spending in the 21st century. Anything more than that is, in my opinion, an overstatement. But this book offers a lot of insights and points toward a future direction that the game industry avoids at its peril. It is definitely worth reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The title and the promises on the covers were interesting. So how or why will the gaming dominate the 21st century? That wasn't really answered in a few clear points. I was expecting the why and how to be more around the economy aspects of the gaming. There were some interesting parts in the book, e.g. gaming history, the current (when it was written in the second half of 2009 so already out of date) economical scale and impact of gaming and the industries and phenomena it has generated. The aver The title and the promises on the covers were interesting. So how or why will the gaming dominate the 21st century? That wasn't really answered in a few clear points. I was expecting the why and how to be more around the economy aspects of the gaming. There were some interesting parts in the book, e.g. gaming history, the current (when it was written in the second half of 2009 so already out of date) economical scale and impact of gaming and the industries and phenomena it has generated. The average gamer was tried to describe, and it's not what it was in 1980s or 1990s. Nearly half of the gamers are women, and the average age of a gamer is somewhere closer to 40. But there could and should have been broader topics treated more in depth in the book. Not all the broader topics were unborn in 2009. iPhones gaming was mentioned on two pages, and while iPhone had been out on the market for a year, its implications in gaming distribution and economy were already there, as were suddenly a lot of smaller game developers around App Store. iPhones and iPads brought a few other interesting, gaming-related changes in other things too. Now there are suddenly a bunch of schools in the US where iPads (much more than Kindles) are used for studying tool. Ebooks, and especially tailored, interactive ebooks, work much better for those kids who are more used to finding their entertainment on their gaming console than reading the books. ADD wasn't really mentioned, but that binds to gaming as well: sometimes the real world is just too boring and too slow. Now finally some people are starting to see ADD not as a problem but as a way one is wired. And for that type of mental wiring, the games can be a good way to grep a variety of things. If you manage to hide maths or physics in a game, the implications can be much better understood in a practical level than just be left to be regurgitated as a bunch of fancy words on a test paper. The gaming can and has changed some other learning tools and methods already. Medical field was specifically mentioned for the uses it could have (do a quick diagnostic on a patient in ER environment as an example). The same field also can get a huge benefit of going towards interactive ebooks. Things that iPad wasn't designed for but has proven to be invaluable already in the capabilities it currently has. Also something where the gaming is already leaving its mark is in resumes. In an example there was mentioned a man who applied for a job in bank, and who was then asked why he hadn't put is guild leader experience in WoW (or other similar game) in his resume. Wait, what? Even the traditional businesses (like the bank as a very traditional example) are starting to realize that perhaps it shows better applied leadership skills to lead a guild of 50-200 gamers on daily (or evening) tasks for the benefit of the team than to own an MBA. Mostly the games were centered in the classic console or MMORPG games, but those are far from the only ones out there. I don't play either, and my type of 'entertainment' games were very vaguely in the book. iPhones, iPads, Androids... in just a few years the market has produced a lot of interesting games, and even in just the past 3 years, a lot of changes have happened in many games. An iPhone game that has been around for 2 years has quite some history. The development of games has shifted in the mobile platform to first have a basic form of game pushed out, then later when/if the game is successful, it gets regular updates pushed for the game. While for iPhone games that was first seen in We Rule, it's now the norm for all of them... I've done a bunch of exploration of 'silly games' in the past 2,5 years and now it's just a few of them that I want to play any more. I'm not sure I could draft a specific how that type of gaming would have changed anything (other than the economics and distribution and habits) in a larger scale though. Some things that the author envisioned aren't going to happen. While Facebook was seen by him as kind of a platform for gaming, and boring without the constant updates of random games (fortunately he only mentioned Playfish, and ignored The Evil™, Zynga)... is it? Most of my friends don't do any gaming in Facebook, or hide the attention whoring game updates out of their walls. Or they create separate gamer profiles to keep their main profile free from the constant Zynga updates. The difference can't even be that most of the author's friends would be gamers and mine not, since most of my friends also play, just not on Facebook. It's very hard to give the book a score. It's so fast out of date... even if one would write now a similar book covering more the aspects of interactive ebooks and iPads for K-12, higher ed or medical schools, it would be out of date as soon as iPad 3 and a few apps for that would be out there. I guess it could be either covered as more of a blog type format, or ebooks (then updating.. no, I still hate the self-updating ebooks), or just printing out a new book about the topic every 1,5 years.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

    Tremendously well-researched and very thought provoking. It deals fairly with the concerns parents have with their kids excessive gaming, but it helped me see that there is much more going on than what I had written off as an antisocial waste of time. The subtitle on this edition-- "Why Play is the 21st century's most serious business"-- is different from the one I read, which is, "Why Gaming Will Dominate the 21st Century." I think both are true. Tremendously well-researched and very thought provoking. It deals fairly with the concerns parents have with their kids excessive gaming, but it helped me see that there is much more going on than what I had written off as an antisocial waste of time. The subtitle on this edition-- "Why Play is the 21st century's most serious business"-- is different from the one I read, which is, "Why Gaming Will Dominate the 21st Century." I think both are true.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alastair Heffernan

    Each chapter offers an interesting description of one or other aspects of video games as a force for change. For example, in describing how video games can be used to investigate economic theories, or how sophisticated government structures can develop in worlds like EVE online and what this may teach us about governing online spaces in general. Other highlights included a description of the Scottish governments adoption of gaming in the classroom. I found these vignettes very informative and th Each chapter offers an interesting description of one or other aspects of video games as a force for change. For example, in describing how video games can be used to investigate economic theories, or how sophisticated government structures can develop in worlds like EVE online and what this may teach us about governing online spaces in general. Other highlights included a description of the Scottish governments adoption of gaming in the classroom. I found these vignettes very informative and thoroughly absorbing. Unfortunately, the wide eyed optimism about gaming's boundless potential, combined with a little too much rather pretentious sociologically and philosophically framed analysis (there was a Heideggerian "being-in-the-world" gratuitously slipped in at one point) very tiring. In addition, I had hoped for a little more description of the actual business side of the games industry, say in terms of the differences between blockbuster development now and how games were made twenty years ago; I feel due to the use of the word "business" on the back cover and the subtitle of the book some description of the business of video games may have appeared somewhere, but this book is really more of a cultural analysis of video games than a book about the business of them. That is a reasonable thing to do, but as other reviewers have noted, the title and description of the book are somewhat misleading. Despite these criticisms I did appreciate reading a well written, passionate book about video games in general because such books are few and far between. It has also encouraged me to try out a few new games which is never a bad thing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    Good: * This book serves as an acceptable introduction to the gaming world for people who don't play. Bad: * Very outdated: filled with quotes and facts from games, people and companies that don't matter/exist anymore. An example: XBox Kinect. Good: * This book serves as an acceptable introduction to the gaming world for people who don't play. Bad: * Very outdated: filled with quotes and facts from games, people and companies that don't matter/exist anymore. An example: XBox Kinect.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mythreyi

    Pretty good introduction to video games . Like a collection of essays one might see in newspaper. Touching on a lot of aspect. Personally, I would like more depth as a non-beginner.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a comprehensive book championing video gaming, the "fun, inc." of the 21st century. If you don't know much about the gaming industry, you've come to the right place. Here you'll learn about the creativity involved in making games, unusual games (flOw, games for change), the history of video gaming, and the many uses of games (military, education, social action and awareness, etc.). The book is well written, but it tends to jump from one anecdote to another rather than engage in an extend This is a comprehensive book championing video gaming, the "fun, inc." of the 21st century. If you don't know much about the gaming industry, you've come to the right place. Here you'll learn about the creativity involved in making games, unusual games (flOw, games for change), the history of video gaming, and the many uses of games (military, education, social action and awareness, etc.). The book is well written, but it tends to jump from one anecdote to another rather than engage in an extended argument. I'm reading now a section on gaming and education (i.e., serious gaming). I found this sentence to be insightful: "And with a game like Guitar Hero, the children can let themselves go, forget they're in school, forget there is some degree of image involved. And then they can, all of them, really start learning." It's interesting that when students forget themselves and change the context of their learning, then they're really in the best position to learn. These ideas connect with other ideas I've read about the use of gaming and role playing to achieve self-motivated learning.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting looks at: The past, present and future of (digital) gaming. Introduced me to the Pirate Bay Pirate Party, the WoW 'Corrupted Blood Plague' of 2005, the games 'Passage' and EVE Online, and some philosophical and ethical debate surrounding gaming. Informative sections on 'serious gaming,' and the professional use of games such as the 'America's Army' and 'Gator Six' examples. The writing is clear and generally well-done, though most chapters are riddled with rambling history-style acad Interesting looks at: The past, present and future of (digital) gaming. Introduced me to the Pirate Bay Pirate Party, the WoW 'Corrupted Blood Plague' of 2005, the games 'Passage' and EVE Online, and some philosophical and ethical debate surrounding gaming. Informative sections on 'serious gaming,' and the professional use of games such as the 'America's Army' and 'Gator Six' examples. The writing is clear and generally well-done, though most chapters are riddled with rambling history-style academic-speak. The author is also quite biased, and seems to largely disagree that there's anything wrong with gaming, whether he admits it or not, and he works for various 'casual gaming' companies which he doesn't hesitate to worm into his text from time to time. There wasn't much of earth-shattering importance or shock in here, but it was a decent non-fic. read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Greta

    I was hoping this book would answer many questions I have regarding why people can spend their lives glued to a screen playing endless "games". But since the book was written by a self-professed gamer, he clearly didn't feel the need to explain that. There was a lot of information about various games and how they work, the origins of electronic gaming, and developments in gaming that have affected other fields. The majority of the book was spent justifying the usefulness and the potential social I was hoping this book would answer many questions I have regarding why people can spend their lives glued to a screen playing endless "games". But since the book was written by a self-professed gamer, he clearly didn't feel the need to explain that. There was a lot of information about various games and how they work, the origins of electronic gaming, and developments in gaming that have affected other fields. The majority of the book was spent justifying the usefulness and the potential social and scientific advancement of the industry and the people who made it to make more stuff that will eventually make our lives better. How gaming really benefits our time on this planet remains a mystery to me. I still don't get it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave Shields

    This is an interesting book about the way video games have changed as an industry and how it has changed global communities. The book has a heavy British influence since its author is British so many American readers may be unfamiliar with some of the company names or games but it doesn't cause too many distractions. The book is not as fluid as I would prefer and seems to randomly jump around a lot but overall it makes a good history book and great reading for those wanting to try to develop v This is an interesting book about the way video games have changed as an industry and how it has changed global communities. The book has a heavy British influence since its author is British so many American readers may be unfamiliar with some of the company names or games but it doesn't cause too many distractions. The book is not as fluid as I would prefer and seems to randomly jump around a lot but overall it makes a good history book and great reading for those wanting to try to develop video games.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Repetitive & the author often loses his train of though, not proving his arguments. However, the gaming history overview is interesting and reading the way in which games are crafted (precise reward rates etc.) was fascinating. Its worth it just to read the last quarter of the book where Chatfield discusses "games for change" (ie. World of Greencraft & Darfur is Dying) and the military & educational applications of games. Would recommend. Repetitive & the author often loses his train of though, not proving his arguments. However, the gaming history overview is interesting and reading the way in which games are crafted (precise reward rates etc.) was fascinating. Its worth it just to read the last quarter of the book where Chatfield discusses "games for change" (ie. World of Greencraft & Darfur is Dying) and the military & educational applications of games. Would recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Pilling

    This book is pretty good but it is also infuriating, it seems both broad and narrow at the same time and sadly narrow where i wanted it to be broad and vice versa. Chatfield has a good style, the book flows (think Metzler or Lewis) but i went away not feeling much better informed and slightly infuriated

  13. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    By now, there are older books that make this very same argument and make it better. This is written in too geek-out of a vernacular to register in pushing games into serious business (the point of the book). Please read GOT GAME by Beck and Wade instead, which has factual data to support its claims.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    An interesting but rather lightweight apologia in defense of video gaming. The author presented several arguments, some based on research findings,on why video gaming is good (or at least not bad), but I felt like perhaps the other side was not acknowledged so it was hard to take the arguments at face value.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Aylott

    There are some interesting pointers to further research here, but this is mostly the standard apologia for Why Video Games Are Important. Which is a fine message that I'm sure many people still need to hear, but isn't all that useful to me. I did like the discussion of an epidemic spreading through World of Warcraft; it gives me evil ideas. There are some interesting pointers to further research here, but this is mostly the standard apologia for Why Video Games Are Important. Which is a fine message that I'm sure many people still need to hear, but isn't all that useful to me. I did like the discussion of an epidemic spreading through World of Warcraft; it gives me evil ideas.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I've read that book after seeing a TED Talk of Tom Chatfield. According to the video, I was expecting more of a gamification strategy type of book, but it's not what it was. It only talked about video games, why people like to play, what they are... things I already knew! I've read that book after seeing a TED Talk of Tom Chatfield. According to the video, I was expecting more of a gamification strategy type of book, but it's not what it was. It only talked about video games, why people like to play, what they are... things I already knew!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simon Bostock

    I'm kind of pre-sold on this particular idea so I'd already read lots of stuff that was quite similar and, therefore, there wasn't that much new stuff for me. More of a book to buy for other people. I'm kind of pre-sold on this particular idea so I'd already read lots of stuff that was quite similar and, therefore, there wasn't that much new stuff for me. More of a book to buy for other people.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Fleck

    Not too bad of a read, it gives a pretty concise glimpse of the good and bad of games, and, quite frankly, makes me really excited for my future as well as my children's, not just in games but technology as a whole Not too bad of a read, it gives a pretty concise glimpse of the good and bad of games, and, quite frankly, makes me really excited for my future as well as my children's, not just in games but technology as a whole

  19. 4 out of 5

    Booknerd Fraser

    While an interesting subject, I can't say I actually learned all that much. Perhaps it is for beginners rather than an intermediate. While an interesting subject, I can't say I actually learned all that much. Perhaps it is for beginners rather than an intermediate.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek Bridge

    This book treats a phenomenally fast-changing field: digital games. Inevitably, it is already out-of-date. Yet, I think this book is thoughtful, thought-provoking and well-informed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megatrend

    Kein neuer Gedanke, aber wohl bekanntes hübsch zusammengefasst.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eurik

    Important, educational, though perhaps not as much fun to read as I was hoping :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Saad Usman

    Got to know that the gaming itself is a multi billion $ market in itself. Interesting way to link it with business.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Carter McKnight

    Nothing new, original or interesting, but a decent bit of fluff to give to that family member or friend who doesn't "get" your gaming habit. Kind of a "Cultural Influence of Videogames for Dummies." Nothing new, original or interesting, but a decent bit of fluff to give to that family member or friend who doesn't "get" your gaming habit. Kind of a "Cultural Influence of Videogames for Dummies."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    A not-too-critical view of the power and potential of video games. Some interesting bits about motivation and games for learning.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    brilliant, really great ideas and good examples for people who don't play games brilliant, really great ideas and good examples for people who don't play games

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sonia Wellington

    Really enjoyable and interesting read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zack

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