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Is Your Mama A Llama? (Limited Edition)

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Deborah Guarino’s classic picture book, illustrated by Steven Kellogg, has sold nearly 1 million copies! Rhyming riddles and six lovable baby animals help Lloyd the llama discover just what kind of animal his mama really is. Gold foil and embossing and an adorable new case cover highlight this limited hardcover edition of an enduring favorite. (This book has been unavailable Deborah Guarino’s classic picture book, illustrated by Steven Kellogg, has sold nearly 1 million copies! Rhyming riddles and six lovable baby animals help Lloyd the llama discover just what kind of animal his mama really is. Gold foil and embossing and an adorable new case cover highlight this limited hardcover edition of an enduring favorite. (This book has been unavailable in hardcover for many years.)


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Deborah Guarino’s classic picture book, illustrated by Steven Kellogg, has sold nearly 1 million copies! Rhyming riddles and six lovable baby animals help Lloyd the llama discover just what kind of animal his mama really is. Gold foil and embossing and an adorable new case cover highlight this limited hardcover edition of an enduring favorite. (This book has been unavailable Deborah Guarino’s classic picture book, illustrated by Steven Kellogg, has sold nearly 1 million copies! Rhyming riddles and six lovable baby animals help Lloyd the llama discover just what kind of animal his mama really is. Gold foil and embossing and an adorable new case cover highlight this limited hardcover edition of an enduring favorite. (This book has been unavailable in hardcover for many years.)

30 review for Is Your Mama A Llama? (Limited Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Triad

    Little Lloyd tries to guess what kind of animal everyone’s mama really is: “Is your mama a llama?” So he discovers that the mothers of his friends are: bat, swan, cow, seal, kangaroo and of course a llama. The first time you read it with your child, she/he probably try to guess the name of the animal's mother. It will be like a game. The second time you read it, she/he will probably remember :) Cute, little book with rhymes. Perfect for spelling and for beginners in reading. Rhythmical riddles and b Little Lloyd tries to guess what kind of animal everyone’s mama really is: “Is your mama a llama?” So he discovers that the mothers of his friends are: bat, swan, cow, seal, kangaroo and of course a llama. The first time you read it with your child, she/he probably try to guess the name of the animal's mother. It will be like a game. The second time you read it, she/he will probably remember :) Cute, little book with rhymes. Perfect for spelling and for beginners in reading. Rhythmical riddles and beautiful simple images.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Precourt

    it is cute

  3. 5 out of 5

    DaveD

    Been reading this almost nightly to my boy. Some solid rhyming in this book and interesting animals, although the protagonist is a bit naive.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eva Marie

    This reminds me (and Julia by the way) an awful lot of the Anna Dewdney books. Or, I should say that Dewdney's books remind me an awful lot of this book because I *think* this came first. I understand that writing a book that consists of "llama mama's" doesn't give one the sole right to "llama mama" books but I don't know, there is a striking similiarity if you ask me. Anyway, I for one like that rhyme. A lot. It just has a real nice ring to it and it's funny as hell. Julia's taken to, on and of This reminds me (and Julia by the way) an awful lot of the Anna Dewdney books. Or, I should say that Dewdney's books remind me an awful lot of this book because I *think* this came first. I understand that writing a book that consists of "llama mama's" doesn't give one the sole right to "llama mama" books but I don't know, there is a striking similiarity if you ask me. Anyway, I for one like that rhyme. A lot. It just has a real nice ring to it and it's funny as hell. Julia's taken to, on and off, calling me her llama mama and we both get a kick out of that. This is fairly short, great for a quick bedtime story, and basically is the story of a little llama asking his friends if their own mama's are llama's. Each friend comes back with a response which rhymes which is then followed by the little llama seeing the light and rhyming with whatever the friends mama is. I'm partial to kids books with rhymes, always have been. Julia doesn't so much care about that herself and can go either way, rhymes or no rhymes. Julia liked the story, she liked the "baby llama" but she did not like the bat. Apparently the bat's cuteness factor was too low for this book. She also said the bat was "too enormous". (He is drawn kind of big I guess.) Other than that she could find no faults.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This is a cute short story. Love the rhymes and illustrations :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Audric the Illiterate

    I like this one up until Deborah tries to rhyme 'Rhonda' with 'responded,' at which point I throw the book on the ground. Hasn't stopped my mom from forcing it down my throat though. Ugh. I like this one up until Deborah tries to rhyme 'Rhonda' with 'responded,' at which point I throw the book on the ground. Hasn't stopped my mom from forcing it down my throat though. Ugh.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    A rhyming guessing game as a young llama asks several different animals "Is your mama a Llama?" All the different animals answer in rhyme and verse the llama's question. A rhyming guessing game as a young llama asks several different animals "Is your mama a Llama?" All the different animals answer in rhyme and verse the llama's question.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This is a sweet children’s picture book about different animals and the different types of mothers they have.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brendon Desrochers

    Despite not always using commas properly in direct address, this is a clever book and a crowd-pleaser.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Richards

    Is Your Mama a Llama? is a children's book about animals written by Deborah Guarino. In the book, Lloyd the llama is very interested in what kind of animals all of his friends mama's are. She begins asking every friend that she sees if their mama is a llama but she finds that all of the friends she asks do not have llama's as mama's. She asks every friend that she knows about their mama until she comes to the last friend who has a special surprise for her about her mama that she didn't realize. Is Your Mama a Llama? is a children's book about animals written by Deborah Guarino. In the book, Lloyd the llama is very interested in what kind of animals all of his friends mama's are. She begins asking every friend that she sees if their mama is a llama but she finds that all of the friends she asks do not have llama's as mama's. She asks every friend that she knows about their mama until she comes to the last friend who has a special surprise for her about her mama that she didn't realize. The book is filled with wonderful lines of rhyming that intrigue the child to continue reading. There are several characteristics of this book that captivates the child other than rhyming. The first thing that really caught my eye was the fact that she wrote the book to have the rhyme on the first two pages and then the answer to what that particular animals mama was is on the next page. I found myself wanting to guess what was on the next page using the rhyme instead of simply reading the words on the next page. Children love to guess and I know that this is a grasping aspect of the book for them. The other characteristic that really would catch children's attention in this book is the fact that it is all about animals. Many children love animals and love to talk about them and this book gives them the chance to do so. I absolutely loved this book except for the ending. The book is an awesome way to get children used to using rhyming words as well as allowing them to use their critical thinking skills and guess what animal is on the next page. I myself really enjoyed reading the rhyming words and about all the different animals so I know that the children would probably feel the same way. Although I really loved this book I really did not like the ending. I think that it is critical for children to use their thinking skills and to be challenged but for the age level that this book is written at I feel that leaving the ending with an ellipsis for the children to create on their own ending is confusing and entirely too difficult. I think that I would use this book for probably second or third grade. It could be integrated into an animal/science lesson or it could also be used in a language arts lesson about rhyming and or foreshadowing. The illustrator of this book was Steven Kellogg. The illustrations are all very sketched looking and appear as if they had been completed using water colors. I really loved the scenery that the illustrator chose to portray of each animal and their habitat. I thought that he did a great justice depicting where the animals would actually be found in the wild and how they would look if you found them. I loved the colors that he used in each picture. Depending on the picture he would use a dark or cool palate to depict and cool and wet place and a warm palate and colors to depict a warm and dry place. I think the colors of the pages make you feel as if you can really understand and feel the atmosphere at the time. The animals look mostly realistic, even though there are some idealized qualities of them. Over all the illustrations lend to the fun and whimsical quality of this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This is a great story for young readers to listen to and to read themselves. It is full of fun rhyming riddles. This is a classic. Lloyd the baby llama meets a different animal on every page; Lloyd asks them, “Is your mama a llama?” The rhyming riddles the animals give Lloyd help him to guess what kind of animal everyone’s mama really is. When he asks his friend Llyn the llama his question he finally gets the answer he has been waiting to hear. Uses for Is Your Mama a Llama?: (Read-Aloud Compreh This is a great story for young readers to listen to and to read themselves. It is full of fun rhyming riddles. This is a classic. Lloyd the baby llama meets a different animal on every page; Lloyd asks them, “Is your mama a llama?” The rhyming riddles the animals give Lloyd help him to guess what kind of animal everyone’s mama really is. When he asks his friend Llyn the llama his question he finally gets the answer he has been waiting to hear. Uses for Is Your Mama a Llama?: (Read-Aloud Comprehension) 1. Read Is Your Mama a Llama? While the story is being read encourage the children to supply the rhyming word that tells the correct animal answer. 2. Hand out paper animal puppets to seven different students; tell them that you are going to read the story again. The student who is holding the baby Llama puppet will stand beside the teacher as the story is being read. The other children will be sitting while listening for the next animal hint. As the hint is given the student who is holding the correct animal will stand up and say their animal’s name and then join the student holding the baby llama puppet. 3. After the story, have students to retell the story in their own words using the puppets to help them. 4. Next, have students sit in a circle on the floor. Scatter all the puppets on the floor in the middle of the circle and have the students line them up in the order that they appeared in the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Allen

    The first time this book came on my radar was when Patrica Arquette was reading it to her daughter on the show Medium. It had such a fun rythm to it that I vowed to look for it the next time I was in a bookstore. Over the summer I was in a used bookstore in Steveston and found it in paperback for $2.00. I had to buy it. This book sits on my bedside table and I frequently read it to Bella when she is either falling asleep or just waking up. I only read it to her when she is sleepy because she lov The first time this book came on my radar was when Patrica Arquette was reading it to her daughter on the show Medium. It had such a fun rythm to it that I vowed to look for it the next time I was in a bookstore. Over the summer I was in a used bookstore in Steveston and found it in paperback for $2.00. I had to buy it. This book sits on my bedside table and I frequently read it to Bella when she is either falling asleep or just waking up. I only read it to her when she is sleepy because she loves turning the pages and I'm afraid she will rip them. However this book is available in board book format so she may end up with it in her Christmas stocking. The illustrations are beautiful and I haven't tired of reading it yet. I also love it when my husband is in the room and I check to see if he is listening by asking him what kind of animal Lloyd's friend's mamma is. I can't wait until Bella is old enough to shout out the answer!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this reissued and revamped version of a classic story, a llama named Lloyd asks various animals if their own mothers are llamas. Each young animal responds in the negative, pointing out characteristics that make their mothers unique. Thus, readers can simply enjoy the rhyming story and its conclusion in which Lloyd's mother finally makes an appearance or they can respond to some of the questions that ask them to pay attention to certain details or notice rhymes as they read. This small book, In this reissued and revamped version of a classic story, a llama named Lloyd asks various animals if their own mothers are llamas. Each young animal responds in the negative, pointing out characteristics that make their mothers unique. Thus, readers can simply enjoy the rhyming story and its conclusion in which Lloyd's mother finally makes an appearance or they can respond to some of the questions that ask them to pay attention to certain details or notice rhymes as they read. This small book, part of the StoryPlay series, also includes more activities and helps youngsters develop various pre-reading skills while developing comprehension strategies. The book is fun to read aloud.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    "Is Your Mama a Llama?" is a very good book to read to children. It is an excellent form for predictability and pattern. The book allows student to guess what kind of animal is being surprised. They are learning about new animals, they may never have heard of before. Also, the pictures in this book portray the story really well and are quite beautiful illustrations. I would definitely read this book in my classroom. "Is Your Mama a Llama?" is a very good book to read to children. It is an excellent form for predictability and pattern. The book allows student to guess what kind of animal is being surprised. They are learning about new animals, they may never have heard of before. Also, the pictures in this book portray the story really well and are quite beautiful illustrations. I would definitely read this book in my classroom.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bhargavi Balachandran

    Lo loved this book. She squealed in delight every time she could guess the animal the clues were given for. She loves books that rhyme and are a little silly- so this one was just perfect for her. Illustrations were super duper cute. Overall a lovely read! We will surely read this a few more times before it goes back to the library, and maybe even look out for our own copy, if she enjoys it consistently after the 'newness' of the book fades Lo loved this book. She squealed in delight every time she could guess the animal the clues were given for. She loves books that rhyme and are a little silly- so this one was just perfect for her. Illustrations were super duper cute. Overall a lovely read! We will surely read this a few more times before it goes back to the library, and maybe even look out for our own copy, if she enjoys it consistently after the 'newness' of the book fades

  16. 5 out of 5

    elissa

    Both of my kids loved this fun rhyming book when they were toddlers and preschoolers, and I've also used it for preschool storytimes. Kellogg's pictures are great, as usual. My older son started calling me "Llama" when he was 8 or 9, which I love! Both of my kids loved this fun rhyming book when they were toddlers and preschoolers, and I've also used it for preschool storytimes. Kellogg's pictures are great, as usual. My older son started calling me "Llama" when he was 8 or 9, which I love!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    A young llama asks his friends if their mamas are llamas and finds out, in rhyme, that their mothers are other types of animals.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Read this aloud once to a child and you'll probably have to read it again and again and again and ... it's been 14 years now and we still recite the rhythmic lines together (from memory). Read this aloud once to a child and you'll probably have to read it again and again and again and ... it's been 14 years now and we still recite the rhythmic lines together (from memory).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Abhors the New GR Design

    Pictures are darling. The rhyme in Spanish is a bit forced because of the stress, but for the most part, it still works.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yuckamashe

    My all time favorite read aloud!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This one makes Alistair smile.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paige Patterson

    Title: Is Your Mama a Llama? Author: Deborah Guarino Illustrator: Steven Kellogg Genre: Predictable Book, Picture Book, Theme(s): Repeated/Patterned Phrase, Animals/Llamas, Family, Opening line/sentence: “Is your mama a llama?” I asked my friend Dave. Brief Book Summary: A llama explores and visits his friends, asking them all, “is your mama a llama?” Each animal replies no, and explains why their mother is different than the llama’s mother. Finally, the llama asks another llama from the same herd an Title: Is Your Mama a Llama? Author: Deborah Guarino Illustrator: Steven Kellogg Genre: Predictable Book, Picture Book, Theme(s): Repeated/Patterned Phrase, Animals/Llamas, Family, Opening line/sentence: “Is your mama a llama?” I asked my friend Dave. Brief Book Summary: A llama explores and visits his friends, asking them all, “is your mama a llama?” Each animal replies no, and explains why their mother is different than the llama’s mother. Finally, the llama asks another llama from the same herd and reunites to cuddle with the mama llama. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Reviewer name N/A, Horn Book Guide: (3) PS series. Nifty, sprightly rhymes tell the story of a little llama who asks each animal he sees, 'Is your mama a llama?' The obvious rhyming answer is hidden on the next page, giving every budding story hour aficionado a chance to be triumphantly right. Cheery illustrations of the animals complete an especially good story hour book. http://www.hornbookguide.com.ezaccess... Professional Recommendation/Review #2: Seth Berg, Children’s Literature, CLCD: A young llama asks all of his friends about their mothers in this entertaining family book. Amusing characters include a bat, a swan, and a kangaroo. The story allows the audience to anticipate the punch line of each sequence by requiring the reader to turn the page to complete the final rhyme of each segment. The illustrations are vibrant, and the narrative follows a nice pattern where the title question is repeated five times before an affirmative answer is finally found. Children can infer the simple lesson from this book that all infants belong to the same species as their mothers. http://www.clcd.com.ezaccess.librarie... Response to Two Professional Reviews: I agree with these reviews that the story’s rhyme makes the story fun for children at the potential of guessing the animal that comes next. The bright, detailed illustrations make the book feel sunny and bright even as the llama searched for his lost mother. The book definitely had a family atmosphere as the llama visits all of his friends and eventually reunites with his mother. Evaluation of Literary Elements: The rhyming in this book gives it a very smooth, almost musical quality to it. Beyond this, it makes it easy for children to guess what the animal word is on the next page. The repeated question of “is your mama a llama” also makes it easy for young children to get involved in reading along with the story. The setting changes along with the animal the llama talks to, making it a bit informational about the habitats in which these animals live. Although it wraps up quite quickly, we still have a satisfying ending as the llama indeed finds her mama. Consideration of Instructional Application: This book would be great in a classroom, as it would be easy to get students involved in the read aloud, both by reading the line “is your mama a llama” and guessing the animal on the next page based on the clues and the rhyme. The book rhymes throughout, so this would be a good book to discuss the text feature of rhyming. Beyond this, the book shows different species of animals and how a baby is the same species as its mother. Going off of this, there could be a mini-lesson comparing and contrasting different types of animals. While all the animals in this book are relatively different, the lesson could expand further and look at, for example, how whales and dolphins have many aspects in common, such as living in the ocean, but still many differences as well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Deborah Guarino and Steven Kellogg's Is Your Mama a Llama? is the story of a Welsh llama with no comprehension of fundamental principles of biology and genetics, wandering around Australia(?) and trying to determine which animals have llamas for mothers. Lloyd the Llama asks his various animal friends whether their mother is a llama. Each friend responds in the negative and describes its mother's features. And by amazing coincidence, it's always the same sort of animal as the friend! Finally, pe Deborah Guarino and Steven Kellogg's Is Your Mama a Llama? is the story of a Welsh llama with no comprehension of fundamental principles of biology and genetics, wandering around Australia(?) and trying to determine which animals have llamas for mothers. Lloyd the Llama asks his various animal friends whether their mother is a llama. Each friend responds in the negative and describes its mother's features. And by amazing coincidence, it's always the same sort of animal as the friend! Finally, perhaps by exhausting all of his other options, he asks his friend Llyn the Llama and learns that her mother and his own are both llamas. Hurray. This story is difficult to wrap my head around. Upon hearing each description, Lloyd immediately recognizes the sort of animal that his friend's mother is. So it's clear that Lloyd knows what a bat (or a seal or a kangaroo or whatever) is, but doesn't seem to make the connection that seals have seals for parents, bats have bat parents, and so on. Is he seriously not making the connection here? The art is fantastic on this one. The animals and other little details on the periphery are among my favorite parts, and the backgrounds are lovely as well. Ultimately, I think that's what saves this book. Beyond the art...well...I guess I'd recommend it to someone who doesn't understand that animals have babies of the same types....or something....I don't know....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Brown

    Is Your Mama a Llama, written by Deborah Guarino is a great book for preschoolers and kindergartners. The book does a great job of keeping children engaged with rhymes and riddles. The book is also a great way for children to learn more about various animals. I also liked the way the book gave hints about what the animals was instead telling the type of animal immediately. This gives the students a chance to guess what the animal is and get them excited about knowing their animals. An example f Is Your Mama a Llama, written by Deborah Guarino is a great book for preschoolers and kindergartners. The book does a great job of keeping children engaged with rhymes and riddles. The book is also a great way for children to learn more about various animals. I also liked the way the book gave hints about what the animals was instead telling the type of animal immediately. This gives the students a chance to guess what the animal is and get them excited about knowing their animals. An example from the book was "She hangs by her feet and she lives in a cage. I do not believe that's how llamas behave. Oh, you are right that. I think your mama sounds more like a... bat." I also think the illustrations matched the text perfectly. The detail of the illustrations weren't too animated and not too realistic. Steven Kellogg did a great job of keeping children engaged through his illustrations. The cover of the book seemed very calming, yet interesting. The colors weren't over the top, but also not dull. Overall this book is great for young children and a great way to keep them involved with reading. I think this book makes for a great read aloud book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was one of my favorite books as a child. I remember it quiet strongly from my years growing up. As an adult now I can really understand and take into consideration what the book is doing. I think it's great because of a few reasons. One is that children can be exposed to several different animals. It also gives them an opportunity to guess them which can help them learn. Another thing that it does is showcase different landscapes, this is very inclusive to many different places around the w This was one of my favorite books as a child. I remember it quiet strongly from my years growing up. As an adult now I can really understand and take into consideration what the book is doing. I think it's great because of a few reasons. One is that children can be exposed to several different animals. It also gives them an opportunity to guess them which can help them learn. Another thing that it does is showcase different landscapes, this is very inclusive to many different places around the world. Many kids may feel like a part of their culture is involved. For instance, the kagaroo is native to Austrilia. So that would help with children all over the world being able to relate. The animals are personified, so we can see them as people. Lloyd speaks with many different people all over the animal kingdom which is great to show that people, especially children can have many friends from different families and places. This might be an old book, but it's one I hold dear. It does have a good message that young readers will understand. I can't wait to share this with my children someday.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    This is a sweet story that revolves around a llama using questioning to identify his mother. Gaurino's rhyme scheme is whimsical and flows easily. A young reader would enjoy the rhythmic pattern of the text. Additionally, the format of the book allows for a pause after each animal speaks which provides an opportunity for a young reader to guess or predict the name of the animal. I really enjoyed the kindness among the animals that is exhibited throughout the story. It is refreshing witness charac This is a sweet story that revolves around a llama using questioning to identify his mother. Gaurino's rhyme scheme is whimsical and flows easily. A young reader would enjoy the rhythmic pattern of the text. Additionally, the format of the book allows for a pause after each animal speaks which provides an opportunity for a young reader to guess or predict the name of the animal. I really enjoyed the kindness among the animals that is exhibited throughout the story. It is refreshing witness characters being so patient and understanding with each other. The book is about 4 inches by 5 inches, making it feel more like a pocket reader or book to take on trips with kids. The paper is thick like cardboard making it seem more durable for young readers. The layout is portrait mode. Kellogg's illustrations are soothing, full of pastels, water color like. The font is straightforward with only select words larger and bold. Overall a pleasant read that would help young readers with repeated practice.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Wilson

    I actually have never read this book until my adult years, and I absolutely loved it. I love the very intricate and beautiful illustrations that are placed on the pages. The text is very simple, but this book employs the use a rhyming to keep a rhythm throughout the whole book. I also really like that this book allows the reader to look and the images and make a prediction of what mama animal the one drawn on the page belongs to. This is a great way that the images and text correlate with one an I actually have never read this book until my adult years, and I absolutely loved it. I love the very intricate and beautiful illustrations that are placed on the pages. The text is very simple, but this book employs the use a rhyming to keep a rhythm throughout the whole book. I also really like that this book allows the reader to look and the images and make a prediction of what mama animal the one drawn on the page belongs to. This is a great way that the images and text correlate with one another and show a connectedness. While the images allow the reader to make a prediction of what animal is coming up on the next page, the last word in each poem does as well, because it relies on rhyming, so students can think ahead and try to find an animal that rhymes with the last word on the following pages. In the classroom I would use this book to discuss the different types of animals and to show students what they look like. Also this book could be used as a very first introduction into poetry and understanding how to rhyme words.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie Mountain

    In "Is Your Mama a Llama?" Lloyd the llama is visiting and playing with his friends who all look different from him. He asks each of them the question "Is your mama a llama?" but they all respond with a description of their mama that doesn't sound like a llama to Lloyd. However, being a very smart little llama, Lloyd can guess what kind of animals the other mamas are. This book is beautiful to read to teach your child about different animals such as bats, swans, cows, seals, and llamas. The rhym In "Is Your Mama a Llama?" Lloyd the llama is visiting and playing with his friends who all look different from him. He asks each of them the question "Is your mama a llama?" but they all respond with a description of their mama that doesn't sound like a llama to Lloyd. However, being a very smart little llama, Lloyd can guess what kind of animals the other mamas are. This book is beautiful to read to teach your child about different animals such as bats, swans, cows, seals, and llamas. The rhymes paired with the story sound beautiful when read allowed and help guide children to the discovery of each animal on Lloyd's search to find his mama. I think children from ages 3-6 would enjoy this story and would benefit from the subtle themes of diversity and how not all babies look like their parents (ex: the swans). When this was read to me as a child, I personally enjoyed the rhymes and illustrations. Each page is full of so many beautiful colors and the animals all look cute and happy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shay

    Is your Mama a Llama? By Deborah Guarino; Illustrated by Steven Kellogg This is one of my favorite books thus far. This specific pattern book has a rhythmic flow which is very attention-seeking from the reads. This book is about a Llama who goes around asking his friends if their mama is a llama. '"Is your mama a llama?" I asked my friend Jane.' Jane happens to be a cow, so it is very comical how they respond. "No she is not", Jane politely explained. " she grazes on grass, and likes to say 'Moo! Is your Mama a Llama? By Deborah Guarino; Illustrated by Steven Kellogg This is one of my favorite books thus far. This specific pattern book has a rhythmic flow which is very attention-seeking from the reads. This book is about a Llama who goes around asking his friends if their mama is a llama. '"Is your mama a llama?" I asked my friend Jane.' Jane happens to be a cow, so it is very comical how they respond. "No she is not", Jane politely explained. " she grazes on grass, and likes to say 'Moo!' I don't think that is what a llama would do." The llama will respond guessing what animal their mom is. Instead, they put the name of the animal on a separate page so that readers can guess along; a nice touch. Lastly, the beautiful watercolor illustrations displaced on each page. They are very well detailed and eye-catching. The overall book is so interesting, well written, and well drew that I can not wait to introduce others to it. Recommended for ages 4 and up.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Blackmon

    Is Your Mama a Llama? is the comical story of young Lloyd the llama discovering the animal mother's of each of his friends. After meeting several different animals, he continues his journey until he finds the answer he's looking for. I would utilize this text in the Children's Literature as Example of Language Play role found in The Roles of Children's Literature in the Primary Grades. The text uses both riddle and rhyme to entertain emergent readers which is the core basis of this role. Accordi Is Your Mama a Llama? is the comical story of young Lloyd the llama discovering the animal mother's of each of his friends. After meeting several different animals, he continues his journey until he finds the answer he's looking for. I would utilize this text in the Children's Literature as Example of Language Play role found in The Roles of Children's Literature in the Primary Grades. The text uses both riddle and rhyme to entertain emergent readers which is the core basis of this role. According to the article, "language play can be encountered in jump rope chants to nursery rhymes, rhyming texts to silly songs, and alliterative texts among many other options-all of which promote engagement and essential emergent literacy skills." Rhyming is a great tool of language play and implemented throughout this text, amongst the introduction of animals, and well suited for the role. If you enjoy this text, you will also enjoy Llama Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney.

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