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ソードアート・オンライン 3: フェアリィ・ダンス [Sōdo āto onrain 3: Fearyi Dansu]

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SAOから未だ帰還できないアスナの行方は…… フェアリィ・ダンス編、開幕! 禁断のデスバトルMMO『ソードアート・オンライン』から現実世界に戻ってきたキリト。彼は攻略パートナーであり、想い人でもあるアスナのもとに向かう。 しかし、結城明日奈は、あの悪夢のゲームからまだ帰還していなかった。 困惑と絶望に包まれるキリト。唯一の手がかりは、鳥籠の中に佇む≪妖精姿≫のアスナという謎の画像データのみ。どうやら彼女は、高スペックVRMMO≪アルヴヘイム・オンライン≫に囚われているらしい。 キリトはアスナを救うため、飛翔する妖精プレイヤーたちが交錯する≪ALO≫に飛び込んでいく……!! WEB上でも屈指の人気を誇った『フェアリィ・ダンス』編、スタート!!


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SAOから未だ帰還できないアスナの行方は…… フェアリィ・ダンス編、開幕! 禁断のデスバトルMMO『ソードアート・オンライン』から現実世界に戻ってきたキリト。彼は攻略パートナーであり、想い人でもあるアスナのもとに向かう。 しかし、結城明日奈は、あの悪夢のゲームからまだ帰還していなかった。 困惑と絶望に包まれるキリト。唯一の手がかりは、鳥籠の中に佇む≪妖精姿≫のアスナという謎の画像データのみ。どうやら彼女は、高スペックVRMMO≪アルヴヘイム・オンライン≫に囚われているらしい。 キリトはアスナを救うため、飛翔する妖精プレイヤーたちが交錯する≪ALO≫に飛び込んでいく……!! WEB上でも屈指の人気を誇った『フェアリィ・ダンス』編、スタート!!

30 review for ソードアート・オンライン 3: フェアリィ・ダンス [Sōdo āto onrain 3: Fearyi Dansu]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sushi (寿司)

    I am so in love with Sword Art Online that I can't wait to read the 4th book but before to reading it I have to read DRRR!! #2 and DanMachi #4. Absolutely 5✰ for SAO. I am so in love with Sword Art Online that I can't wait to read the 4th book but before to reading it I have to read DRRR!! #2 and DanMachi #4. Absolutely 5✰ for SAO.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matisse

    Internet, you told me the Fairy Dance arc (books 3 & 4) of SAO was terrible. I was clearly lied to. Kawahara wrote this volume after writing three books in his 'Accel World' series, which is the more grounded, human series. That growth has bled into SAO, and it's for the better. This was the best novel so far, for many reasons. The Aincrad novels (books 1 & 2) didn't develop Kirito as a protagonist, and while there were a few places where Kawahara stretches his author chops, he was mostly just w Internet, you told me the Fairy Dance arc (books 3 & 4) of SAO was terrible. I was clearly lied to. Kawahara wrote this volume after writing three books in his 'Accel World' series, which is the more grounded, human series. That growth has bled into SAO, and it's for the better. This was the best novel so far, for many reasons. The Aincrad novels (books 1 & 2) didn't develop Kirito as a protagonist, and while there were a few places where Kawahara stretches his author chops, he was mostly just writing straightforward story. Here, Kirito is given a real challenge that tests him outside of his comfort zone and forces him to grow, both in and out of the virtual reality. Kawahara spends most of the novel writing from Suguha/Leafa's perspective, and when he jams back to Kirito, it's in the first-person tense from the first novel. The result is a well-written universe as seen through Suguha's perspective, and an intimate first-person voice that is not split between characters. In the actual prose-side of things, the narrative is tighter than in the previous volumes. Fights are more kinetic, and there's less techno-babble for how the game engine works. We meet Suguha/Leafa before she meets Kirito, and so unlike with Asuna from book 1, we don't have to be caught up in any pre-existing romantic tension. The climax is weak, but unlike the Aincrad arc, this volume isn't the entire story. I reserve judgment for this segment of the SAO story for once I've finished the next volume. But for the moment, I am quite pleased with it. =)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    (view spoiler)[ I like the way Kirito plays the game even though he has more at stake, rescuing Asuna, then any other player in the game. He says at one point in the novel, that how a person acts in an MMO effects how that person acts IRL. I think the same can be said for the types of media we consume. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ I like the way Kirito plays the game even though he has more at stake, rescuing Asuna, then any other player in the game. He says at one point in the novel, that how a person acts in an MMO effects how that person acts IRL. I think the same can be said for the types of media we consume. (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina "Look At My Books"

    Was ok although it dragged a lot. The Anime version was better in my opinion

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bluehbleh Blah

    I really enjoyed this sequel to the first sword art online. It expanded upon the romance that I enjoyed in the first volume and introduced more action and adventure in the universe I so enjoyed. The world is not as good as Aincrad in my opinion but still good all the same. I recommend this book to anyone who read the first sword art online and I know you will enjoy it. I feel the anime did not portray just how good this novel was so even if you are discouraged from the anime still watch it, it g I really enjoyed this sequel to the first sword art online. It expanded upon the romance that I enjoyed in the first volume and introduced more action and adventure in the universe I so enjoyed. The world is not as good as Aincrad in my opinion but still good all the same. I recommend this book to anyone who read the first sword art online and I know you will enjoy it. I feel the anime did not portray just how good this novel was so even if you are discouraged from the anime still watch it, it gets even better after this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Derrick Hardin

    This book wasn't as good as the first, but better than the second, so I gave it four stars. Considering there are only three chapters, it was hard to find a decent stopping place. Also, each of the three chapters were broken up into "micro chapters" that switched the two sides of the story, Kirito and Leafa's side and then Asuna and Oberon's. It was somewhat confusing at times. It was a pretty good book, but the anime was a little better. Just saying, I liked this part of the anime, unlike every This book wasn't as good as the first, but better than the second, so I gave it four stars. Considering there are only three chapters, it was hard to find a decent stopping place. Also, each of the three chapters were broken up into "micro chapters" that switched the two sides of the story, Kirito and Leafa's side and then Asuna and Oberon's. It was somewhat confusing at times. It was a pretty good book, but the anime was a little better. Just saying, I liked this part of the anime, unlike everyone else.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    I've watched the anime and I've found that the books are the essence that made the anime so fantastic. Sugu's struggle does turn me off a bit, but the rest of the story is amazing. What happens to Mr. jerkface makes me happy. And since the anime was soooo vivid, it was even better I my head. It couldn't have happened to a nicer a-hole. I've watched the anime and I've found that the books are the essence that made the anime so fantastic. Sugu's struggle does turn me off a bit, but the rest of the story is amazing. What happens to Mr. jerkface makes me happy. And since the anime was soooo vivid, it was even better I my head. It couldn't have happened to a nicer a-hole.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maikasmotivationisdead

    „Sword Art Online: Fairy Dance” is 3rd volume of Japanese, fantasy light novel series written by Reki Kawahara, Illustrated by Abec (Abeshi, BUNBUN) and published in 2009 by Kadokawa Corporation. It’s set in 2025 and it tells a story about Kazuto Kirigaya, or more commonly – Kirito, who is a 16-year-old boy trapped in a VR game of life and death: Sword Art Online. After two years of gaining experience points and passing the next floors of Aincrad – Castle, which holds all the players, he has to „Sword Art Online: Fairy Dance” is 3rd volume of Japanese, fantasy light novel series written by Reki Kawahara, Illustrated by Abec (Abeshi, BUNBUN) and published in 2009 by Kadokawa Corporation. It’s set in 2025 and it tells a story about Kazuto Kirigaya, or more commonly – Kirito, who is a 16-year-old boy trapped in a VR game of life and death: Sword Art Online. After two years of gaining experience points and passing the next floors of Aincrad – Castle, which holds all the players, he has to deal with a new game: ALfheim Online, which holds his partner and girlfriend – Asuna. Although Kirito is pretty overpowered and dull character, I think that his story is really good for a few reasons: World created by Reki Kawahara, which has some sort of energy in it, illustrations by abec that are just amazing and show us magic from the world of ALfheim Online, and all the other things that he does in the name of love and happiness. I would recommend it to anyone, who likes games, fantasy or is an anime fan. It’s also really good for starting your adventure with Japanese pop culture and is pretty classic part of any anime fan’s bookcase.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Allen

    Loved this installment as well! Kawahara's writing saw a definite improvement here. Of course, I already knew what was going to happen thanks to the show, but I loved diving deeper into the characters here. Loved this installment as well! Kawahara's writing saw a definite improvement here. Of course, I already knew what was going to happen thanks to the show, but I loved diving deeper into the characters here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Kasyfil

    For a light novel, it was amazing! I could imagine the battle between Kirito and Captain Eugeune. The battle was more amazing than Heatcliff's in the first book. And the story is not too simple so the writer couldn't finished it just in one volume. It was different with the first and second book when the the first book told us the main event of the store while the second book just told us the side event. The writer used three perspective in this book. Firs, we read at Lyfa's (which is also Suugu) For a light novel, it was amazing! I could imagine the battle between Kirito and Captain Eugeune. The battle was more amazing than Heatcliff's in the first book. And the story is not too simple so the writer couldn't finished it just in one volume. It was different with the first and second book when the the first book told us the main event of the store while the second book just told us the side event. The writer used three perspective in this book. Firs, we read at Lyfa's (which is also Suugu). Second, we read at Kirito's (Kazuto). Least and the last, the writer used third person's perspective while he write "he" and "her" instead of Kirito and Lyfa. writer's writing style made this book more interisting and more worthed to read than the second book, and for me, it was better than the first book. Even though I have watched the anime version of this book, I still found this book interesting to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I keep liking these books so much. Although, this kinda looks like SAO, I still liked the story, I like crazy people and both Suguha and Sugou have serious issues. XD Kirito is still the hero, and of course the best of everything, but I did expect that. And the evil plot Sugou has in mind... oh dear, that's really evil. I want more! I keep liking these books so much. Although, this kinda looks like SAO, I still liked the story, I like crazy people and both Suguha and Sugou have serious issues. XD Kirito is still the hero, and of course the best of everything, but I did expect that. And the evil plot Sugou has in mind... oh dear, that's really evil. I want more!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Very good! I get a bit annoyed with how every girl falls for Kirito, but other than that I really like it. I love the concept, which you don't see too often. Very good! I get a bit annoyed with how every girl falls for Kirito, but other than that I really like it. I love the concept, which you don't see too often.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    And the plot thickens... Why does Kirito attract so many girls... including me?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    So if we look to the first season on the anime--which, at this point, I reckon most readers will have seen before backtracking to the light novels--it had this odd split. The first half of the series takes place in Sword Art Online. The second half in Alfheim. So this volume covers the first half of the Alfheim arc. In anime form, it's not my favorite part of SAO. It's fine enough, but doesn't have the same energy or charge as the opening arc. This problem doesn't feel quite as marked in light n So if we look to the first season on the anime--which, at this point, I reckon most readers will have seen before backtracking to the light novels--it had this odd split. The first half of the series takes place in Sword Art Online. The second half in Alfheim. So this volume covers the first half of the Alfheim arc. In anime form, it's not my favorite part of SAO. It's fine enough, but doesn't have the same energy or charge as the opening arc. This problem doesn't feel quite as marked in light novel form. And if you've seen the anime, you know what you're getting here: Starting a few months after Kirito awakened from his time in SAO, he's fallen into a routine. It's a routine of waiting. In the aftermath of beating SAO, almost all the surviving SAO players have woken up and, like Kirito, recovering. But a handful hasn't yet woken, including Asuna. So Kirito is in limbo: Back in the real world, yet unable to connect with the woman he loves. So he goes to the hospital, sleeps, casually makes jokes with his sister, and generally drifts through life. All that changes when one of his old SAO friends comes upon a screenshot taken in a new MMORPG where an imprisoned character looks a whole lot like Asuna. Needless to say, Kirito needs to get back into the full dive life. This section flips between two main characters (with a very occasional third): Kirito (which are written in first person) and his sister (written in third person). Well, we say "sister," but she's actually a cousin, which matters because she has a bit of a crush on Kirito (something apparently less taboo in Japan). Even she knows this is a doomed crush--he has Asuna, after all, and even if they're technically not siblings, they were raised as siblings--so maybe that's why she's taken to playing Alfheim, where she's risen to be a top player in her faction. And unfortunately, it's in Alfheim where she meets Kirito at the start of his quest for Asuna, neither knowing the other is who they are, literally in the same real world house. So there's a bittersweet sense to this whole volume. Kirito physically advancing his quest is good--we need Asuna saved, damnit!--but his sister becomes a charming character in her own right. We empathize with her situation, and the cruel twist that the in-game guy she's kind of falling for is also her brother. And the advantage of a light novel over the anime adaptation here is we get a lot more of her perspective, allowing it to feel like a major thrust of this arc, rather than some side drama. As satisfying as some of Kirito's battles are, it's this tension between two siblings (er, cousinlings?) playing together without knowing who they are that makes reading this volume so damned addictive. Anyway, if you weren't so fond of this arc in the anime and were iffy on whether to read on after the SAO arc, I can say--as someone who also wasn't so fond of this arc in the anime--that this is a good read. I can't guarantee anyone else will agree with me, but the strengths of the arc are much more apparent in written form.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Khari

    About the Mary-Sueness. Yep. Kirito is such a character trope. At least in this particular book it has an explanation. He's so fast because for some reason his character data has transferred to ALO from SAO, so two years of life-and-death experience and pure level grinding would transfer over pretty heavily. He's still a Mary Sue. And I still love him. :D I like how he's changing. In the first book he was so painfully shy and had no confidence in himself and constantly blamed himself. Now he fixe About the Mary-Sueness. Yep. Kirito is such a character trope. At least in this particular book it has an explanation. He's so fast because for some reason his character data has transferred to ALO from SAO, so two years of life-and-death experience and pure level grinding would transfer over pretty heavily. He's still a Mary Sue. And I still love him. :D I like how he's changing. In the first book he was so painfully shy and had no confidence in himself and constantly blamed himself. Now he fixes his eyes on a goal and just keeps heading towards it. He did something that he regretted in the first book when he left his friend Klein behind, and now he refuses to leave anyone else behind. I like to see that kind of growth. Also, the voice actor in the anime has an amazing voice and I swear when I'm reading I hear his voice sometimes, which is odd, because I don't normally 'hear' when I read, but maybe it's more like a background feeling? I don't know. It's very hard to describe what happens in my brain when I read. When I think, I think in words, and I think in conversations. I usually have two avatars having a discussion, one of myself and one of whoever I'm having the discussion with. But when I'm reading, I don't hear it in words...it's like a movie...but not like a movie because it's fast. So, a movie on fast forward? With lots of murmuring in the background? I suppose that's the closest. Anyway. I am thoroughly enjoying the books. Even though Kirito is larger than life and is constantly and consistently being fallen in love with. They are just fun to read, not great works of literature, there are lots of problems, and I don't particularly care, because they are fun and interesting. The one thing I thought was good in this book was how Sugou saw an opportunity to further his research and captured 300 people to use as human experiments. I can see that happening. We all hope for the best, and congratulate ourselves on how advanced we are, now we have IRB boards to keep us from experimenting unethically on humans and all that, but I can totally see megalomaniacal researchers obsessed with power and no regard for human life and human freedom ignoring everything and keeping people imprisoned to experiment on them. It's happened before. It's happening now in China. So probably the part that most people found the most difficult to believe wasn't a problem for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Cootey

    I was a little nervous about this book before starting it. The TV series was a bit soft hentai, and it featured an incestuous sub plot where Suguha pined for her cousin while developing a crush on “Kirito” (both the same man) inside the video game. That’s a bit of a spoiler, but after so many years, probably not. This is not as strong a book as the first two. Having read the author’s comments, I can see where he struggled to find a new direction for the series. There was more emphasis on the gami I was a little nervous about this book before starting it. The TV series was a bit soft hentai, and it featured an incestuous sub plot where Suguha pined for her cousin while developing a crush on “Kirito” (both the same man) inside the video game. That’s a bit of a spoiler, but after so many years, probably not. This is not as strong a book as the first two. Having read the author’s comments, I can see where he struggled to find a new direction for the series. There was more emphasis on the gaming world mechanics in this story arc than in the Aincrad story arc. Parts could be very dull. Reki Kawahara’s real life gamer influence roared strongly. This was something I didn’t feel happened in the first two books despite copious world building. Asuna had been turned into a damsel in distress. Extremely disappointing because I loved her character. She was so strong and feminine—an influential force in Kirito’s life—now just a girl stuck in a cage. I’ve played 8-bit video games with more depth of motivation. The brother/sister fixation in Japanese media is something that puzzles me. I didn’t have any sisters, but I don’t see how incest gets sexy. It’s a trope that continues to live on. Fortunately, there was just a lot of pining and angst, and no uncomfortable scenes. Although the game mechanics aspect of the story could be overpowering, the world building was solid, the characters were interesting, and even though Kirito was vastly OP, it was still a fun read. I read the Baka-Tsuki fan translation. This one had tons of mistakes, so I definitely plan on buying the big collection and rereading the professional Yen version at the beginning of 2021.

  17. 5 out of 5

    emily_oriley

    Okay, so, I'm aware this is not everyone's favorite SAO arc; mostly for two reasons: Suguha's love for Kirito and making Asuna the damsel in distress. The second makes sense when you really analyze the situation Asuna has found herself in—she quite literally is unable to fight back—so there should be a little forgiveness there. As for the first... well, condoning nothing, but there are cultural differences here that should be taken into account. In Japan, though not as common as before, cousins Okay, so, I'm aware this is not everyone's favorite SAO arc; mostly for two reasons: Suguha's love for Kirito and making Asuna the damsel in distress. The second makes sense when you really analyze the situation Asuna has found herself in—she quite literally is unable to fight back—so there should be a little forgiveness there. As for the first... well, condoning nothing, but there are cultural differences here that should be taken into account. In Japan, though not as common as before, cousins are free to marry. So you really can't condemn something because it's not a part of your personal culture. Make sense? Now let's get to why I don't like this arc. I am a huge Kirito fan and for the Aincrad books, I liked following his perspective and forgave the few short stories told from the other character's POV. This book is only about 20% from Kirito's POV—the other 80% is told through Suguha and Lyfa's perspective. Which I very much did not enjoy. I do understand the reasoning behind it—Kirito does not know ALO so in order to get some world building/background established, it makes sense to use a character familiar with it. Doesn't mean I have to like it. Anyway, it's a short read and it's a two-parter so don't pick this up unless you're planning on reading both because there is no resolution at all. I'll go more into depth on my review after reading the next volume since, again, this is an incomplete story. Hopefully the narrative will be more balanced.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tuna

    After testing the waters with writing from the perspective of other characters, Kawahara appears to have decided to make that his focus from here on out. Seeing the story from the perspective of Asuna trapped in a cage, or the sister who’s watched firsthand her brother lying in a comatose state for two years, was compelling. I think Kirito perspective is the strongest, the sister, Leafa/Suguha, is second strongest and Asuna is the weakest, though I also just think Asuna isn’t that interesting of After testing the waters with writing from the perspective of other characters, Kawahara appears to have decided to make that his focus from here on out. Seeing the story from the perspective of Asuna trapped in a cage, or the sister who’s watched firsthand her brother lying in a comatose state for two years, was compelling. I think Kirito perspective is the strongest, the sister, Leafa/Suguha, is second strongest and Asuna is the weakest, though I also just think Asuna isn’t that interesting of a character and everyone else provides something deeper and rounder, like they feel real while she just feels like the helpless love interest. In any case, Asuna is indeed trapped in this volume and just a plaything for the antagonist, while Leafa takes the stage as the strong female character, even at times better than Kirito. Kirito, meanwhile, is doing all that he can to find her, and Leafa is the one guiding Kirito in this new game. Yui has a role her providing some moments of comedy to the Kirito Leafa dynamic and some explanation of the new games mechanics. Overall, I love this new arc, this new game, and the mini-story in the games world. Adding magic to the sword art online universe was a great addition and seeing Kirito as an agile illusionist whose epic at swords is cool. Great volume.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    The book happens after SAO was defeated and Kirito/Kazuto wakes up...but Asuna does not. His search to wake her up has him going back into the virtual world in a game called Alfheim Online. He starts a new journey to find Asuna, teaming up with a character named Leafa. But Leafa is actually someone he knows. SAO continues to be one of my favorite Japanese light novel stories. If you've seen the anime, the two are almost identical. Yet in this light novel you feel a little more depth to the story The book happens after SAO was defeated and Kirito/Kazuto wakes up...but Asuna does not. His search to wake her up has him going back into the virtual world in a game called Alfheim Online. He starts a new journey to find Asuna, teaming up with a character named Leafa. But Leafa is actually someone he knows. SAO continues to be one of my favorite Japanese light novel stories. If you've seen the anime, the two are almost identical. Yet in this light novel you feel a little more depth to the story being told mostly through Leafa/Suguha's eyes. Kirito is still overpowered in the virtual world and knows it, which is fun when it comes to the battles in the book. There is some lovey-agnst from one of the characters which I didn't care for much, but it does make for some interesting relationship dynamics. SAO is definitely a series where the light novel trumps the manga. Looking forward to reading more!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alan Stebbens

    Characters You Care About A wonderful story continues, with characters that you care about: they’re like family (“Ohana”, as the Hawaiians say), and you want to know that not only are they going to be okay, but that they’ll achieve their goals and become happy. So, you keep reading. Along the way, you learn what it’s like to become involved with a virtual person, to care about him or her, even though you may not have actually met them IRL (In Real Life). Learning that, you also learn that it’s you Characters You Care About A wonderful story continues, with characters that you care about: they’re like family (“Ohana”, as the Hawaiians say), and you want to know that not only are they going to be okay, but that they’ll achieve their goals and become happy. So, you keep reading. Along the way, you learn what it’s like to become involved with a virtual person, to care about him or her, even though you may not have actually met them IRL (In Real Life). Learning that, you also learn that it’s your feelings acquired from shared experiences that bind people together. Whether those experiences are in the real world or they occurred in a virtual world, shared experiences can be the foundation of a lifelong relationship. You should start reading the series, if you haven’t. I’m off to the next book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather Wright

    As with the previous two books, I watched the anime first but still wholeheartedly recommend the book even for those who already know the story. If you liked the first two books, I expect you'll like this latest installment. If you like the idea of virtual worlds, true humanity coming through an RPG, and your fantasy and sci-fi mixed together, you'll like this series. Kirito continues to evolve on the page as we learn more about him and the new characters are just as well done as the ones we've As with the previous two books, I watched the anime first but still wholeheartedly recommend the book even for those who already know the story. If you liked the first two books, I expect you'll like this latest installment. If you like the idea of virtual worlds, true humanity coming through an RPG, and your fantasy and sci-fi mixed together, you'll like this series. Kirito continues to evolve on the page as we learn more about him and the new characters are just as well done as the ones we've met before. If you finished the first two books wanting to know what happened next, this is the answer (or at least the next installment) in a story that shares some of the same themes. I'm very much looking forward to reading book four (which I will be starting moments after finishing this one if that tells you anything).

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    Book Three was definitely a bit jarring at first. The perspective of the story shifts from Kirito to a new character. At first I wasn't a fan of this but as I kept reading I found myself enjoying it. Honestly I think keeping it in Kirito's perspective would have been a mistake. The first story worked because it was claustrophobic. Keeping the perspective in first person made sense and complemented the world of sword art online very well. In this story we lose that claustrophobic feeling, switching Book Three was definitely a bit jarring at first. The perspective of the story shifts from Kirito to a new character. At first I wasn't a fan of this but as I kept reading I found myself enjoying it. Honestly I think keeping it in Kirito's perspective would have been a mistake. The first story worked because it was claustrophobic. Keeping the perspective in first person made sense and complemented the world of sword art online very well. In this story we lose that claustrophobic feeling, switching perspectives suits the story much better. The book takes place directly after the fall of sword art online. But everything isn't peachy keen. The fear of death may be gone but the stakes are still high. A very solid read, I look forward to continuing the series!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aakash Yadav

    It was kind of a let down after four fantastic short stories in the previous book. It just felt like filler, nothing major happening. The first half shows Kirito the emo who is always sad and the other half shows Kirito the powerful who destroys players as if they are ants. I have no problem with overpowerful characters, in fact I like it but it was boring. There were also good parts in the book so I wasn't totally disappointed. Hoping the next book has more action than this. It was kind of a let down after four fantastic short stories in the previous book. It just felt like filler, nothing major happening. The first half shows Kirito the emo who is always sad and the other half shows Kirito the powerful who destroys players as if they are ants. I have no problem with overpowerful characters, in fact I like it but it was boring. There were also good parts in the book so I wasn't totally disappointed. Hoping the next book has more action than this.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Yasiru

    The anime based on this series has come to be highly regarded within a very short time (it has just begun to cover the present Alfheim arc), and having watched it and gotten up to date, I gave in to temptation and decided to give the light novels a go. They have not disappointed. BeginnerXP's PDF files (among others) of the Baka-Tsuki community translation are at http://www.baka-tsuki.org/forums/view... (where other file formats are also available) and come pleasingly formatted. The Baka-Tsuki pro The anime based on this series has come to be highly regarded within a very short time (it has just begun to cover the present Alfheim arc), and having watched it and gotten up to date, I gave in to temptation and decided to give the light novels a go. They have not disappointed. BeginnerXP's PDF files (among others) of the Baka-Tsuki community translation are at http://www.baka-tsuki.org/forums/view... (where other file formats are also available) and come pleasingly formatted. The Baka-Tsuki project page where you can read the novels online (by chapter if this is preferred) is http://www.baka-tsuki.org/project/ind... Of the series itself, I was already sold on the premise by the anime (the Aincrad arc, covered in the previous two volumes of the light novel) which is a pleasant departure from the .hack// mould. Sword Art Online takes itself less seriously and presents a more approachable face to the viewer, and the vaguely harem-like elements faintly recall the manga series The World God Only Knows. This is not to say however that the series fails to deliver drama-wise. In the Aincrad arc the sense of wonder at being engulfed in a fantasy world and the tentative and beguiling interactions between game personas soon collapses due to the desperate reality the players are thrust into (incidentally with a seeming nod to Berserk, which might have instantly won it my favour), making the setting almost incidental. In the present Fairy Dance arc set in a new game, Alfheim Online, the original gameplay elements (as opposed to the all-encompassing struggle for survival element) return to the fore with the lowered stakes and more traditional game-like standards like magic (absent from Sword Art Online) and flight. Through the new characters (particularly Lyfa) we see questions raised of identity and the prevalence of 'cushioned malice' (in that killings and betrayals haven't the same impact as in SAO, or indeed real life) as players pursue varied individual goals, while Yui, whose origins are now known, now grows to have personality apart from being a mystery or indeed just a steadfast supporter of her Papa (i.e- Kirito). All this serves to make the protagonist Kirito, who still plays for high stakes just as before for Asuna's sake, all the more strange and enigmatic in the eyes of others (besides his SAO-endowed advantages). However, he no longer faces the same alienation as in the early days of the Aincrad arc and a more cheerful side of his personality shows through. While I've appreciated Kirito being different from the usual oblivious protagonist in that he possesses skills which he has knowingly honed from the start, the series doesn't have quite the same range of characters as a light novel series like To Aru Majutsu no Index (reviewed here and also available on Baka-Tsuki) despite being rather better written on the whole, which makes these new demarcations through different values and allegiances all the more advantageous to it. Suguha's viewpoints are another highlight, especially considering her feelings towards her (adopted) brother and the happy coincidence (or not- since Yui's explanation in this volume as to where Kirito ended up doesn't appeal to the manner in which his former stats were restored, instead mentioning inference due in some way to another player) that brought them together in the game. The author's portrait of her is compelling and at odds with the impression had in the earlier arc from Kirito talking about her (if anything, this tells us more about Kirito's propensity towards guilt as with Klein). The thought of Asuna as a damsel in distress was at first grating, but she soon devises a scheme to leave her cage and in the doing shows herself as resourceful as ever (romance and melodrama can sometimes actually help a story if it doesn't detract from its other strengths- Sword Art Online is an excellent example of this). From her father's seeming apathy in the real world, allowing Sugou to do as he has done to his own daughter and others right under his nose, we also get a glimpse into Asuna's family background and social station, recalling her early thoughts about these games in the Aincrad arc. Sugou, or King Oberon as he appears in the game, is as different a villain from Kayaba Akihiko/Heathcliff as can be hoped for, and the character is able to genuinely sicken and inspire loathing in the reader (as opposed to Kayaba Akihiko's restrained and almost ideological evil). Aside from his detestable behaviour, his ambition and base cunning betray a small mind and foolish vanity at times and it will be interesting to see how Kirito and company save the situation in the next volume. In all, this is an excellent entry in the series which expands the scope of it using the newly crafted world of Alfheim Online while at the same time defining what to expect in future beyond new settings. It's an engaging read with interesting new characters and fresh takes on familiar ones augmenting the superb pace (even for a light novel) and action-driven plot, and comes highly recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Minigandalf

    I watched the first season of the Anime and decided to read the light novel. The first two books are not something new if you saw the Anime but this one is really good. I liked the constant switches between the first-person narrator and third-person narrator what gives the story more depth. I can recommend this one even though you already saw the Anime I'm looking forward to the fourth book. I watched the first season of the Anime and decided to read the light novel. The first two books are not something new if you saw the Anime but this one is really good. I liked the constant switches between the first-person narrator and third-person narrator what gives the story more depth. I can recommend this one even though you already saw the Anime I'm looking forward to the fourth book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lucien Welsh

    Suguha pisses me the hell off so I almost want to give this book a 3, but Kirito's epic fight at the end makes up for it. Not to mention Kirito suffering in the real world honestly makes me sob so I can't take off too many points for a book that successfully makes me cry. Now to fight through SAO4 and see my darling Asuna kick some pervert ass. Suguha pisses me the hell off so I almost want to give this book a 3, but Kirito's epic fight at the end makes up for it. Not to mention Kirito suffering in the real world honestly makes me sob so I can't take off too many points for a book that successfully makes me cry. Now to fight through SAO4 and see my darling Asuna kick some pervert ass.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

    I don’t care if they’re “actually” cousins; they were raised as siblings and it’s disgusting that his sister catches feelings for him as soon as she realizes they’re not quite as related. YUCK YUCK YUCK. I’m only going to keep reading this as long as Asuna doesn’t get molested...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This was almost better than the anime, just because it went into more detail. By more detail I mean, it gives a deeper look into the characters and their minds.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo

    I love this arc, it's human and deep and colorful. If you don't like Fairy Dance, is because you don't get it ;) I love this arc, it's human and deep and colorful. If you don't like Fairy Dance, is because you don't get it ;)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    This book is an awkward middle book. It's necessary for the next one which is MUCH better, but that's exactly how it feels. This book is an awkward middle book. It's necessary for the next one which is MUCH better, but that's exactly how it feels.

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